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  1. Ilkka Pyysiäinen & Marc Hauser (2010). The Origins of Religion : Evolved Adaptation or by-Product? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):104-109.
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  2. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2006). Does Meditation Swamp Working Memory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):626-627.
    Religionists often presuppose that “mysticism” aims at somehow emptying the mind. In the light of evidence, however, meditation seems rather to consist of ritualized action without an explicit emphasis on subjective experience. Boyer & Lienard's (B&L's) theory of ritualized action as “swamping” working memory thus might help explain the effects of meditation without postulating experiential goals the “mystics” obviously do not have. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  3. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2006). No Evidence of a Specific Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):483-484.
    Bering's findings about the mental representation of dead agents are important, although his opposition between “endemic” and “cultural” concepts is misleading. Endemic and cultural are overlapping, not exclusive categories. It is also diffcult to see why reasoning about the dead would require a specific cognitive mechanism. Bering presents no clear evidence for the claim that the postulated mechanism is an adaptation.
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  4. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2004). Religion is Neither Costly nor Beneficial. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):746-746.
    Some forms of religion may in some cases alleviate existential anxieties and help maintain morality; yet religion can also persist without serving any such functions. Atran & Norenzayan (A&N) are unclear about the importance of these functions for a theory of the recurrence of religious beliefs and behaviors.
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  5. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2003). Dual-Process Theories and Hybrid Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):617-618.
    The distinction between such differing approaches to cognition as connectionism and rule-based models is paralleled by a distinction between two basic modes of cognition postulated in the so-called dual-process theories. Integrating these theories with insights from hybrid systems might help solve the dilemma of combining the demands of evolutionary plausibility and computational universality. No single approach alone can achieve this.
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  6. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (2003). True Fiction: Philosophy and Psychology of Religious Belief. Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):109 – 125.
    The phenomenon of religious belief has been much discussed in philosophy of religion. However, a priori argumentation alone cannot establish what religious belief is like as a psychological attitude. Recent advances in the cognitive science of religion have paved the way for a new, naturalized philosophy of religion. Taking into account the relevant results and hypotheses presented within these disciplines, it is possible to develop a more empirically informed philosophy of religious belief. Instead of asking whether believing is rational, it (...)
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  7. Ilkka Pyysiainen (2002). Mind and Miracles. Zygon 37 (3):729-740.
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  8. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (1999). 'God'as Ultimate Reality in Religion and in Science. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 22 (2):106-123.
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  9. Ilkka Pyysiäinen (1996). Belief and Beyond: Religious Categorization of Reality. Åbo Akademi.
     
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  10. Ilkka Pyysiainen (1996). Jnanagarbha and the “God's-Eye View”. Asian Philosophy 6 (3):197-206.
    Abstract In trying to define the difference between conventional and ultimate truth, the M?dhyamika Buddhist author Jñ?nagarbha ends up in paradoxical formulations. Putnam's discussion of Nietzsche's remark that ?as the circle of science grows larger it touches paradox at more places? is presented as an illustration for Jñ?nagarbha's case. No comparison of Putnam and Jñ?nagarbha is intended as regards the contents of their presentations, the focus being only on the logical form of their argumentation. The paradoxical nature of Jñ?nagarbha's doctrinal (...)
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