Search results for 'Imagery' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Briscoe (2011). Mental Imagery and the Varieties of Amodal Perception. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (2):153-173.score: 24.0
    The problem of amodal perception is the problem of how we represent features of perceived objects that are occluded or otherwise hidden from us. Bence Nanay (2010) has recently proposed that we amodally perceive an object's occluded features by imaginatively projecting them into the relevant regions of visual egocentric space. In this paper, I argue that amodal perception is not a single, unitary capacity. Drawing appropriate distinctions reveals amodal perception to be characterized not only by mental imagery, as Nanay (...)
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  2. Evan Thompson (2007). Look Again: Phenomenology and Mental Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (1-2):137-170.score: 24.0
    This paper (1) sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery; (2) applies this analysis to the mental imagery debate in cognitive science; (3) briefly sketches a neurophenomenological approach to mental imagery; and (4) compares the results of this discussion with Dennett’s heterophenomenology.
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  3. Bence Nanay (2010). Perception and Imagination: Amodal Perception as Mental Imagery. Philosophical Studies 150 (2):239 - 254.score: 24.0
    When we see an object, we also represent those parts of it that are not visible. The question is how we represent them: this is the problem of amodal perception. I will consider three possible accounts: (a) we see them, (b) we have non-perceptual beliefs about them and (c) we have immediate perceptual access to them, and point out that all of these views face both empirical and conceptual objections. I suggest and defend a fourth account, according to which we (...)
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  4. Amy Kind, Imagery and Imagination. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Both imagery and imagination play an important part in our mental lives. This article, which has three main sections, discusses both of these phenomena, and the connection between them. The first part discusses mental images and, in particular, the dispute about their representational nature that has become known as the _imagery debate_ . The second part turns to the faculty of the imagination, discussing the long philosophical tradition linking mental imagery and the imagination—a tradition that came under attack (...)
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  5. Evan Thompson (2008). Representationalism and the Phenomenology of Mental Imagery. Synthese 160 (3):203--213.score: 24.0
    This paper sketches a phenomenological analysis of visual mental imagery and uses it to criticize representationalism and the internalist-versus-externalist framework for understanding consciousness. Contrary to internalist views of mental imagery imagery experience is not the experience of a phenomenal mental picture inspected by the mind’s eye, but rather the mental simulation of perceptual experience. Furthermore, there are experiential differences in perceiving and imagining that are not differences in the properties represented by these experiences. Therefore, externalist representationalism, which (...)
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  6. James Genone (2006). Concepts and Imagery in Episodic Memory. Anthropology and Philosophy 7 (1/2):95-107.score: 24.0
    The relationship between perceptual experience and memory can seem to pose a chal- lenge for conceptualism, the thesis that perceptual experiences require the actualization of conceptual capacities. Since subjects can recall features of past experiences for which they lacked corresponding concepts at the time of the original experience, it would seem that a subject’s conceptual capacities do not impose a limit on what he or she can experience perceptually. But this conclusion ignores the fact that concepts can be composed of (...)
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  7. Nigel J. T. Thomas (2005). Mental Imagery, Philosophical Issues About. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science, Volume 2, pp. 1147-1153. Nature Publishing Group.score: 24.0
    An introduction to the science and philosophy of mental imagery.
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  8. Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft (1997). Mental Simulation and Motor Imagery. Philosophy of Science 64 (1):161-80.score: 24.0
    Motor imagery typically involves an experience as of moving a body part. Recent studies reveal close parallels between the constraints on motor imagery and those on actual motor performance. How are these parallels to be explained? We advance a simulative theory of motor imagery, modeled on the idea that we predict and explain the decisions of others by simulating their decision-making processes. By proposing that motor imagery is essentially off-line motor action, we explain the tendency of (...)
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  9. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Perceptual Content and the Content of Mental Imagery. Philosophical Studies.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that the phenomenal similarity between perceiving and visualizing can be explained by the similarity between the structure of the content of these two different mental states. And this puts important constraints on how we should think about perceptual content and the content of mental imagery.
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  10. Myrto I. Mylopoulos (2011). Why Reject a Sensory Imagery Theory of Control Consciousness? Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):268-272.score: 24.0
    Mandik (2010) defends a motor theory of control consciousness according to which nonsensory states, like motor commands, directly contribute to the awareness we have of ourselves as being in control of our actions. Along the way, he argues that his theory is to be preferred over Prinz’s (2007) sensory imagery theory, which denies that nonsensory states play any direct role in the generation of control consciousness. I argue that Mandik’s criticisms of Prinz’s theory fall short, but that nonetheless there (...)
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  11. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case From Synesthesia and Visual Imagery. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library.score: 24.0
    The paper argues that the English verb ‘to see’ can denote three different kinds of conscious states of seeing, involving visual experiences, visual seeming states and introspective seeming states, respectively. The case for the claim that there are three kinds of seeing comes from synesthesia and visual imagery. Synesthesia is a relatively rare neurological condition in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream involuntarily leads to associated experiences in a second unstimulated stream. Visual synesthesia is often considered a (...)
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  12. Kim Sterelny (1986). The Imagery Debate. Philosophy of Science 53 (December):560-83.score: 24.0
    One central debate in cognitive science is over imagery. Do images constitute, or constitute evidence for, a distinctive, depictive form of mental representation? The most sophisticated advocacy of this view has been developed by Kosslyn and his coworkers. This paper focuses on his position and argues (i) that though Kosslyn has not developed a satisfactory account of depiction, there is nothing in principle unintelligible about the idea of depictive neural representation, but (ii) Kosslyn's model of imagery rescues the (...)
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  13. Jonathan Cohen (1996). The Imagery Debate: A Critical Assessment. Journal of Philosophical Research 21 (January):149-182.score: 24.0
    No one disputes that certain cognitive tasks involve the use of images. On the other hand, there has been substantial disagreement over whether the representations in which imaginal tasks are carried out are imaginal or propositional. The empirical literature on the topic which has accrued over the last twenty years suggests that there is a functional equivalence between mental imagery and perception: when peopIe imagine a scene or event, the mental processes that occur are functionally similar in important senses (...)
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  14. Jan Degenaar (2014). Through the Inverting Glass: First-Person Observations on Spatial Vision and Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):373-393.score: 24.0
    Experience with inverting glasses reveals key factors of spatial vision. Interpretations of the literature based on the metaphor of a “visual image” have raised the question whether visual experience with inverting glasses remains inverted or whether it may turn back to normal after adaptation to the glasses. Here, I report on my experience with left/right inverting glasses and argue that a more fine-grained sensorimotor analysis can resolve the issue. Crucially, inverting glasses introduce a conflict at the very heart of spatial (...)
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  15. Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, Sophie Schwartz & G. Smith (1979). On the Demystification of Mental Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-81.score: 24.0
    What might a theory of mental imagery look like, and how might one begin formulating such a theory? These are the central questions addressed in the present paper. The first section outlines the general research direction taken here and provides an overview of the empirical foundations of our theory of image representation and processing. Four issues are considered in succession, and the relevant results of experiments are presented and discussed. The second section begins with a discussion of the proper (...)
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  16. Ladina Bezzola, Susan Mérillat & Lutz Jäncke (2012). The Effect of Leisure Activity Golf Practice on Motor Imagery: An fMRI Study in Middle Adulthood. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Much is known about practice-induced plasticity of the motor system. But it is not clear whether the activity in the motor network induced by mental motor imagery is influenced by actually practicing the imagined motor tasks. In a longitudinal study design with two measurement time-points, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to explore dynamic changes in the brain in response to training of highly complex movements by participants of 40 to 60 years of age. The investigated motor learning (...)
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  17. Kan Zhang Jianhui Wu, Hongxia Duan, Xing Tian, Peipei Wang (2012). The Effects of Visual Imagery on Face Identification: An ERP Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The present study tested the hypothesis that the effects of mental imagery on subsequent perception occur at a later matching stage in perceptual identification, but not in the early perceptual stage as in perceptual detection. The behavioral results suggested that the effect of visual imagery on visual identification is content-specific, i.e., imagining a congruent face facilitates face identification, whereas a mismatch between imagery and perception leads to an interference effect. More importantly, the ERP results revealed that a (...)
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  18. Paulo S. Boggio Olivia M. Lapenta, Ludovico Minati, Felipe Fregni (2013). Je Pense Donc Je Fais: Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Brain Oscillations Associated with Motor Imagery and Movement Observation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Motor system neural networks are activated during movement imagery, observation and execution, with a neural signature characterized by suppression of the Mu rhythm. In order to investigate the origin of this neurophysiological marker, we tested whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modifies Mu rhythm oscillations during tasks involving observation and imagery of biological and non-biological movements. We applied tDCS (anodal, cathodal and sham) in 21 male participants (mean age 23.8+3.06), over the left M1 with a current of 2mA (...)
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  19. Gert Pfurtscheller, Teodoro Solis Escalante, Robert J. Barry, Daniela Sabine Klobassa, Christa Neuper & Gernot Mueller-Putz (2013). Brisk Heart Rate and EEG Changes During Execution and Withholding of Cue-Paced Foot Motor Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Cue-paced motor imagery is a frequently used mental strategy to realize a Brain-Computer Interace (BCI). Recently it has been reported that 2 motor imagery tasks can be separated with a high accuracy within the first second after cue presentation onset. To investigate this phenomenon in detail we studied the dynamics of motor cortex beta oscillations in EEG and the changes in heart rate (HR) during visual cue-paced foot imagery using a go (execution of imagery) versus nogo (...)
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  20. Caroline Palmer Rachel M. Brown (2013). Auditory and Motor Imagery Modulate Learning in Music Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Skilled performers such as athletes or musicians can improve their performance by imagining the actions or sensory outcomes associated with their skill. Performers vary widely in their auditory and motor imagery abilities, and these individual differences influence sensorimotor learning. It is unknown whether imagery abilities influence both memory encoding and retrieval. We examined how auditory and motor imagery abilities influence musicians’ encoding (during Learning, as they practiced novel melodies), and retrieval (during Recall of those melodies). Pianists learned (...)
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  21. Joel Pearson Rosanne L. Rademaker (2012). Training Visual Imagery: Improvements of Metacognition, but Not Imagery Strength. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Visual imagery has been closely linked to brain mechanisms involved in perception. Can visual imagery, like visual perception, improve by means of training? Previous research has demonstrated that people can reliably evaluate the vividness of single episodes of sensory imagination – might the metacognition of imagery also improve over the course of training? We had participants imagine colored Gabor patterns for an hour a day, over the course of five consecutive days, and again two weeks after training. (...)
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  22. Arnaud Saimpont, Martin F. Lafleur, Francine Malouin, Carol L. Richards, Julien Doyon & Philip L. Jackson (2013). The Comparison Between Motor Imagery and Verbal Rehearsal on the Learning of Sequential Movements. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Mental practice refers to the cognitive rehearsal of a physical activity. It is widely used by athletes to enhance their performance and its efficiency to help train motor function in people with physical disabilities is now recognized. Mental practice is generally based on motor imagery (MI) i.e. the conscious simulation of a movement without its actual execution. It may also be based on verbal rehearsal (VR) i.e. the silent rehearsal of the labels associated with an action. In this study, (...)
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  23. Aymeric Guillot Tadhg E. MacIntyre, Aidan P. Moran, Christian Collet (2013). An Emerging Paradigm: A Strength-Based Approach to Exploring Mental Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Mental imagery, or the ability to simulate in the mind information that is not currently perceived by the senses, has attracted considerable research interest in psychology since the early 1970s. Within the past two decades, research in this field – as in cognitive psychology more generally - has been dominated by neuroscientific methods that typically involve comparisons between the imagery performance of participants from clinical populations with those who exhibit apparently normal cognitive functioning. Although this approach has been (...)
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  24. Teresa Schuhmann Alexander T. Sack (2012). Hemispheric Differences Within the Fronto-Parietal Network Dynamics Underlying Spatial Imagery. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Spatial imagery refers to the inspection and evaluation of spatial features (e.g. distance, relative position, configuration) and/or the spatial manipulation (e.g. rotation, shifting, reorienting) of mentally generated visual images. In the past few decades, psychophysical as well as functional brain imaging studies have indicated that any such processing of spatially-coded information and/or manipulation based on mental images i) is subject to similar behavioral demands and limitations as in the case of spatial processing based on real visual images, and ii) (...)
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  25. Giorgio Ganis Haline E. Schendan (2012). Electrophysiological Potentials Reveal Cortical Mechanisms for Mental Imagery, Mental Simulation, and Grounded (Embodied) Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Grounded cognition theory proposes that cognition, including meaning, is grounded in sensorimotor processing. The mechanism for grounding cognition is mental simulation, which is a type of mental imagery that re-enacts modal processing. To reveal top-down, cortical mechanisms for mental simulation of shape, event-related potentials were recorded to face and object pictures preceded by mental imagery of a picture. Mental imagery of the identical face or object (congruous condition) facilitated not only categorical perception (VPP/N170) but also later visual (...)
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  26. Jennifer Lapum, Terrence Yau, Kathryn Church, Perin Ruttonsha & Alison Matthews David (forthcoming). Un-Earthing Emotions Through Art: Facilitating Reflective Practice with Poetry and Photographic Imagery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities:1-6.score: 24.0
    In this article, we comment upon and provide an arts-informed example of an emotive-focused reflection of a health care practitioner. Specifically, we use poetry and photographic imagery as tools to un-earth practitioners’ emotions within agonizing and traumatic clinical encounters. In order to recognize one’s own humanness and authentically engage in the art of medicine, we immerse ourselves in the first author’s poetic and photographic self-reflection. The poem and image are intended to inspire interpretation and meaning based on the reader’s (...)
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  27. Lora T. Likova (2012). A Cross-Modal Perspective on the Relationships Between Imagery and Working Memory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Mapping the distinctions and interrelationships between imagery and working memory remains challenging. Although each of these major cognitive constructs is defined and treated in various ways across studies, most accept that both imagery and working memory involve a form of internal representation available to our awareness. In working memory, there is a further emphasis on active maintenance and use of this conscious representation to guide voluntary action. Multicomponent working memory models incorporate representational buffers, such as the visuo-spatial sketchpad, (...)
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  28. Martin Lotze (2013). Kinesthetic Imagery of Musical Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Musicians use different kinds of imagery. This review focuses on kinesthetic imagery, which has been shown to be an effective complement to actively playing an instrument. However, experience in actual movement performance seems to be a requirement for a recruitment of those brain areas representing movement ideation during imagery. An internal model of movement performance might be more differentiated when training has been more intense or simply performed more often. Therefore, with respect to kinesthetic imagery, these (...)
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  29. Roel M. Willems, Ivan Toni, Peter Hagoort & Daniel Casasanto (2009). Body-Specific Motor Imagery of Hand Actions: Neural Evidence From Right- and Left-Handers. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:39-39.score: 24.0
    If motor imagery uses neural structures involved in action execution, then the neural correlates of imagining an action should differ between individuals who tend to execute the action differently. Here we report fMRI data showing that motor imagery is influenced by the way people habitually perform motor actions with their particular bodies; that is, motor imagery is ‘body-specific’ (Casasanto, 2009). During mental imagery for complex hand actions, activation of cortical areas involved in motor planning and execution (...)
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  30. Jianhui Wu, Hongxia Duan, Xing Tian, Peipei Wang & Kan Zhang (2012). The Effects of Visual Imagery on Face Identification: An ERP Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The present study tested the hypothesis that the effects of mental imagery on subsequent perception occur at a later matching stage in perceptual identification, but not in the early perceptual stage as in perceptual detection. The behavioral results suggested that the effect of visual imagery on visual identification is content-specific, i.e., imagining a congruent face facilitates face identification, whereas a mismatch between imagery and perception leads to an interference effect. More importantly, the ERP results revealed that a (...)
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  31. A. Guillot C. Collet, F. Di Rienzo, N. El Hoyek (2013). Autonomic Nervous System Correlates in Movement Observation and Motor Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature offering a better understanding on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) correlates in motor imagery (MI) and movement observation. These are two high brain functions involving sensori-motor coupling, mediated by memory systems. How observing or mentally rehearsing a movement affect ANS activity has not been extensively investigated. The links between cognitive functions and ANS responses are not so obvious. We first describe the organization of the (...)
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  32. Roger T. Dean Freya Bailes, Laura Bishop, Catherine J. Stevens (2012). Mental Imagery for Musical Changes in Loudness. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e. pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force (...)
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  33. Chris McNorgan (2012). A Meta-Analytic Review of Multisensory Imagery Identifies the Neural Correlates of Modality-Specific and Modality-General Imagery. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The relationship between imagery and mental representations induced through perception has been the subject of philosophical discussion since antiquity and of vigorous scientific debate in the last century. The relatively recent advent of functional neuroimaging has allowed neuroscientists to look for brain-based evidence for or against the argument that perceptual processes underlie mental imagery. Recent investigations of imagery in many new domains and the parallel development of new meta-analytic techniques now afford us a clearer picture of the (...)
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  34. Xiaojie Zhao, Sutao Song, Qing Ye, Jia Guo & Li Yao (2013). Causal Interaction Following the Alteration of Target Region Activation During Motor Imagery Training Using Real-Time fMRI. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:866.score: 24.0
    Motor imagery training is an effective approach for motor skill learning and motor function rehabilitation. As a novel method of motor imagery training, real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) enables individuals to acquire self-control of localized brain activation, achieving desired changes in behavior. The regulation of target region activation by rtfMRI often alters the activation of related brain regions. However, the interaction between the target region and these related regions is unclear. The Granger causality model (GCM) is a data-driven method that (...)
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  35. Marc F. Krellenstein (1995). Unsolvable Problems, Visual Imagery, and Explanatory Satisfaction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (3):235-54.score: 21.0
    It has been suggested that certain problems may be unsolvable because of the mind's cognitive structure, but we may wonder what problems, and exactly why. The ultimate origin of the universe and the mind-body problem seem to be two such problems. As to why, Colin McGinn has argued that the mind-body problem is unsolvable because any theoretical concepts about the brain will be observation-based and unable to connect to unobservable subjective experience. McGinn's argument suggests a requirement of imagability -- an (...)
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  36. James A. Blachowicz (1997). Analog Representation Beyond Mental Imagery. Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):55-84.score: 21.0
  37. Gregory Currie (1995). Visual Imagery as the Simulation of Vision. Mind and Language 10 (1-2):25-44.score: 21.0
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  38. Mark Rollins (2001). The Strategic Eye: Kosslyn's Theory of Imagery and Perception. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (2):267-286.score: 21.0
  39. Nigel J. T. Thomas, Are There People Who Do Not Experience Imagery? (And Why Does It Matter?).score: 21.0
    To the best of my knowledge, with the exception of Galton's original work (1880, 1883), Sommer's brief case study (1978), and Faw's (1997, 2009) articles, this is the only really substantial discussion of the phenomenon of non-brain-damaged "non-imagers" available anywhere.
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  40. Sven Dupr (2008). Inside the Camera Obscura. Kepler's Experiment and Theory of Optical Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 13 (3):219-244.score: 21.0
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  41. Peter F. R. Haynes (1976). Mental Imagery. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (December):705-720.score: 21.0
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  42. M. Jeannerod (1994). The Representing Brain: Neural Correlates of Motor Intention and Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):187.score: 21.0
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  43. Christoph Lüthy & Alexis Smets (2009). Words, Lines, Diagrams, Images: Towards a History of Scientific Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):398-439.score: 21.0
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  44. Ellis M. Craig (1973). Role of Mental Imagery in Free Recall of Deaf, Blind, and Normal Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):249.score: 21.0
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  45. Joel Pearson & Stephen M. Kosslyn (2013). Mental Imagery. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  46. William A. Cook (1973). Imagery Mnemonic Instruction Effects on Cued Recall of Word Tetrads. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):273.score: 21.0
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  47. P. J. Holmes & D. J. Murray (1974). Free Recall of Sentences as a Function of Imagery and Predictability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):748.score: 21.0
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  48. Allan Paivio, John C. Yuille & Stephen A. Madigan (1968). Concreteness, Imagery, and Meaningfulness Values for 925 Nouns. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (1p2):1.score: 21.0
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  49. Allan Paivio & John C. Yuille (1969). Changes in Associative Strategies and Paired-Associate Learning Over Trials as a Function of Work Imagery and Type of Learning Set. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (3p1):458.score: 21.0
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  50. Mathias Reiser (2011). Strength Gains by Motor Imagery with Different Ratios of Physical to Mental Practice. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
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