Search results for 'Imagination (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    John David North, Lodi Nauta & Arie Johan Vanderjagt (eds.) (1999). Between Demonstration and Imagination: Essays in the History of Science and Philosophy Presented to John D. North. Brill.
    The essays in this volume reflect the wide-ranging interests of John D. North, distinguished historian of science and philosophy.
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  2. Jeremiah Hackett (2001). Between Demonstration and Imagination: Essays in the History of Science and Philosophy by Lodi Nauta; Arjo Vanderjagt. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:245-246.
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  3. L. Michell (1989). History and Imagination in the Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur. South African Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):41-49.
     
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  4.  53
    J. M. Cocking (1991). Imagination: A Study in the History of Ideas. Routledge.
    Many writers have paid tribute to its power: Shakespeare urged his audiences to use it to create a setting; Hobbes asserted that "imagination and memory are but one thing; " for Wordsworth it was "the mightiest leveler known to moral world; " and to Baudelaire it represented "the queen of truth. " Imagination as artistic, poetic, and cultural predicate remains one of the most influential ideas in the history of Western thought. It has been simultaneously feared as (...)
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  5.  11
    Patrick Harpur (2002). The Philosophers' Secret Fire: A History of the Imagination. Ivan R. Dee.
    As this inspiring book shows, the secret of this perennial wisdom is of an imaginative insight: a simple way of seeing that re-enchants our existence and ...
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  6.  5
    Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) (2004). Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 Août 2002. [REVIEW] Brepols.
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  7. Mary Warnock (1994). Imagination and Time. Blackwell.
    All religion and much philosophy has been concerned with the contrast between the ephemeral and the eternal. Human beings have always sought ways to overcome time, and to prove that death is not the end. This book consists then in an exploration of certain closely related ideas: personal identity, time, history and our commitment to the future, and the role of imagination in life.
     
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  8.  37
    Warren Breckman & Martin Jay (eds.) (2009). The Modernist Imagination: Intellectual History and Critical Theory: Essays in Honor of Martin Jay. Berghahn Books.
    This volumeincludes work from some of the most prominentcontemporary scholars in the humanities.
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  9.  37
    Gary M. Hamburg & Randall Allen Poole (eds.) (2010). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830-1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction: the humanist tradition in Russian philosophy G. M. Hamburg and Randall A. Poole; Part I. The Nineteenth Century: 1. Slavophiles, Westernizers, and the birth of Russian philosophical humanism Sergey Horujy; 2. Alexander Herzen Derek Offord; 3. Materialism and the radical intelligentsia: the 1860s Victoria S. Frede; 4. Russian ethical humanism: from populism to neo-idealism Thomas Nemeth; Part II. Russian Metaphysical Idealism in Defense of Human Dignity: 5. Boris Chicherin and human dignity (...)
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  10.  6
    Richard Schaefer (2013). The Madness of Franz Brentano: Religion, Secularisation and the History of Philosophy. History of European Ideas 39 (4):541-560.
    In recent decades, scholars have shown a distinct new willingness to concede the important place of religion in the life and thought of the philosopher Franz Brentano. However, these studies are still dominated by the presumption that Brentano's life and thought are best understood according to a model of secularisation as a progressive waning of religion. This essay asks whether such a presumption is the best way of understanding the complex interconnections between various elements of his philosophical and religious ideas. (...)
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  11. H. R. Trevor-Roper (1980). History and Imagination. Oxford University Press.
     
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  12. Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh (2010). New Literature and Philosophy of the Middle East: The Chaotic Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Images of Chaos: An Introduction * Tactic I: Desertion (chaotic movement) * First Annihilation: Fall of Being, Burial of the Real * Tactic II: Contagion (chaotic transmission) * Second Annihilation: Betrayal, Fracture, and the Poetic Edge * Tactic III: Shadow-Becoming (chaotic appearance) * Chaos-Consciousness: Towards Blindness * Tactic IV: The Inhuman (chaotic incantation) * Epilogue: Corollaries of Emergence.
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  13.  4
    Cecilia Miller (1993). Giambattista Vico: Imagination and Historical Knowledge. Macmillan/St. Martin's Press.
    The theories of language and society of Giambattista Vico (1668-1744) are examined in this textual analysis of the full range of his theoretical writings, with special emphasis on his little-known early works. Vico's fundamental importance in the history of European ideas lies in his strong anti-Cartesian, anti-French and anti-Enlightenment views. In an age in which intellectuals adopted a rational approach, Vico stressed the nonrational element in man - in particular, imagination - as well as social and civil relationships, (...)
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  14.  32
    Matthew William Maguire (2006). The Conversion of Imagination: From Pascal Through Rousseau to Tocqueville. Harvard University Press.
    Pascal, turning Augustinianism inside out, radically expanded the powers of imagination implicit in the work of Montaigne and Descartes, and made imagination ...
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  15.  33
    John D. Lyons (2005). Before Imagination: Embodied Thought From Montaigne to Rousseau. Stanford University Press.
    Before imagination became the transcendent and creative faculty promoted by the Romantics, it was for something quite different. Not reserved to a privileged few, imagination was instead considered a universal ability that each person could direct in practical ways. To imagine something meant to form in the mind a replica of a thing—its taste, its sound, and other physical attributes. At the end of the Renaissance, there was a movement to encourage individuals to develop their ability to imagine (...)
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  16.  29
    Patricia Cook (ed.) (1993). Philosophical Imagination and Cultural Memory: Appropriating Historical Traditions. Duke University Press.
    In this volume some of today's most influential thinkers face the question of philosophy's future and find an answer in its past.
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  17. Michelle Karnes (2011). Imagination, Meditation, and Cognition in the Middle Ages. The University of Chicago Press.
    Aristotelian imagination -- A Bonaventuran synthesis -- Imagination in Bonaventure's Meditations -- Exercising imagination: the Meditationes vitae Christi and Stimulus amoris -- From "wit to wisedom": Langland's Ymaginatif -- Imagination in translation: Love's myrrour and The Prickynge of love -- Conclusion.
     
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  18.  18
    Michael V. Wedin (1988). Mind and Imagination in Aristotle. Yale University Press.
  19.  22
    Koen Vermeir (2008). Imagination Between Physick and Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 18 (1):119-137.
    I argue that the imagination plays a central role in the thought of the Cambridge Platonist Henry More. First, physiological descriptions of melancholy and imagination were at the heart of his attack against enthusiasm and atheism. Second, in order to defend his metaphysical dualism, he had to respond to traditional accounts of the imagination as a mediating faculty between body and soul. Third, More also opposed the traditional view that the imagination was a material faculty, because (...)
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  20.  8
    James Tar Tsaaior (2012). Postcolonial History, Memory and the Poetic Imagination. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 7 (17):28-39.
    This paper, therefore, ploughs the furrow of postcolonial history, memory and the poetic imagination deploying the poetry of the Nigerian poet Joe Ushie.In particular, the paper negotiates the Rwandan genocide as a tragic foreground of the imperial process through its indulgent, artificial fixing of boundaries to accomplish its empire-building project in Africa. But beyond the colonial mediation in, and onslaught on, the cultures of others, the paper argues that African societies have also been complicit in their agonistic and (...)
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  21.  6
    Mary Gerhart (1979). Imagination and History in Ricoeur's Interpretation Theory. Philosophy Today 23 (1):51-68.
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  22.  4
    J. E. Saindon (1975). Book Reviews : The Dialectical Imagination: A History of the Frankfurt School and the Institute of Social Research, I923-I950. By Martin Jay. Boston, Toronto: Little, Brown and Company, I973. Pp. 382. $4.75 (Paper). Critical Theory of Society (Translation of Kritische Gesellschaftstheorie Und Positiv Ismus). By Albrecht Wellmer, Translated by John Cumming. New York : Herder and Herder, I97i. Pp. I39. $6.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (1):79-83.
  23.  18
    Jennifer B. Bleazby (2012). Dewey's Notion of Imagination in Philosophy for Children. Education and Culture 28 (2):95-111.
    Kieran Egan states that imagination "is a concept that has come down to us with a history of suspicion and mistrust" (2007, p. 4). Like experience and the emotions, the imagination is frequently thought to be an obstacle to reason. While reason is conceived of as an abstract, objective and rule-governed method of delivering absolute truths, the imagination is considered "unconstrained, arbitrary, and fanciful," as well as "particular, subjective, and idiosyncratic" (Jo 2002, p. 39). This negative (...)
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  24.  7
    Steven M. Nadler (1993). The Collected Essays of Gregor Sebba: Truth, History and the Imagination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):477-478.
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  25.  3
    Gisela Shaw (1972). Transcendental Imagination. On Fichte's Early Philosophy in the Context of Transcendental Idealism. Philosophy and History 5 (1):27-29.
  26.  2
    Daniel Tourinho Peres (2011). Notas sobre o déficit teórico da imaginação sociológica na filosofia da história de Kant. Doispontos 8 (1).
    O artigo procura argumentar contra a ideia de que a filosofia da história de Kant contaria com dois modelos de fundamentação: um modelo oficial, de natureza hipotético-teleológica, e outro hermenêutico-explicativo, que, porém, acabaria por implodir o sistema. Trata-se de mostrar que há um único modelo, de natureza hermenêutica-explicativa, que não obstante faz uso de princípios hipotético-teleológicos. Mais ainda, que tal modelo está presente ao longo de diversos momentos do sistema, como na Doutrina do Direito , ou na Religião nos limites (...)
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  27. Gregor Sebba, Hendrikus Boers, Aníbal A. Bueno & Helen Sebba (1991). The Collected Essays of Gregor Sebba Truth, History, and the Imagination.
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  28. Andrew Benjamin (1988). Reviews : Rodolphe Gasché, The Tain of the Mirror: Derrida and the Philosophy of Reflection, London: Harvard University Press, 1986, £22.25, Viii × 348 Pp. John Sallis, Spacings - Of Reason and Imagination: In Texts of Kant, Fichte, Hegel, London: University of Chicago Press, 1987, £19.95, Paper £8.75, Xvi + 177 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 1 (2):283-287.
  29. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Charitable Interpretations and the Political Domestication of Spinoza, or, Benedict in the Land of the Secular Imagination. In Mogens Laerke Eric Schilsser (ed.), The Methodology of the History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    In a beautiful recent essay, the philosopher Walter Sinnott-Armstrong explains the reasons for his departure from evangelical Christianity, the religious culture in which he was brought up. Sinnot-Armstrong contrasts the interpretive methods used by good philosophers and fundamentalist believers: Good philosophers face objections and uncertainties. They follow where arguments lead, even when their conclusions are surprising and disturbing. Intellectual honesty is also required of scholars who interpret philosophical texts. If I had distorted Kant’s view to make him reach a conclusion (...)
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  30.  9
    Edward Grant (2011). How Theology, Imagination, and the Spirit of Inquiry Shaped Natural Philosophy in the Late Middle Ages. History of Science 49 (1):89-108.
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  31.  48
    Nigel J. T. Thomas (1998). Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, they say, our (...)
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  32.  40
    Thomas Nigel (1998). Imagination, Eliminativism, and the Pre-History of Consciousness. Consciousness Research Abstracts 3.
    Classical and medieval writers had no term for consciousness in anything like the modern sense, and their philosophy seems not to have been troubled by the mind-body problem. Contemporary eliminativists find strong support in this fact for their claim that consciousness does not exist, or, at least, is not an appropriate scientific explanandum. They typically hold that contemporary conceptions of consciousness are artefacts of Descartes' (now outmoded) views about matter and his unrealistic craving for epistemological certainty. Essentially, they say, our (...)
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  33.  24
    Alessandra Beasley Von Burg (2010). Caught Between History and Imagination: Vico's Ingenium for a Rhetorical Renovation of Citizenship. Philosophy and Rhetoric 43 (1):pp. 26-53.
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  34.  9
    Michael S. Kochin (1999). Weeds: Cultivating the Imagination in Medieval Arabic Political Philosophy. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):399-416.
  35. Hugh De Ferranti, Robert Bagley, Gustav Heldt, Jennifer Rudolph, Yi Tae-Jin, Charlotte von Verschuer, Kristen Lee Hunter, Jessieca Leo, Catherine Despeux & Livia Kohn (2013). The Last Biwa Singer: A Blind Musician in History, Imagination and Performance. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
     
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  36. Mary Tiles (2004). Cristina Chimisso, Gaston Bachelard: Critic of Science and the Imagination. Routledge Studies in Twentieth-Century Philosophy, 9. London and New York: Routledge, 2001. Pp. XI+285. Isbn 0-415-26905-9. £71.99. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 37 (3):366-367.
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  37. Alessandra Beasley Von Burg (2010). Caught Between History and Imagination. Philosophy and Rhetoric 43 (1):26.
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  38. Richard Kearney (1991). Poetics of Imagining: From Husserl to Lyotard. Harpercollinsacademic.
  39. Jean-Claude Gens & Pierre Rodrigo (eds.) (2007). Puissances de L'Image. Editions Universitaires de Dijon.
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  40.  25
    Ernesto Grassi (1980). Rhetoric as Philosophy: The Humanist Tradition. Southern Illinois University Press.
    Originally published in English in 1980, Rhetoric as Philosophy has been out of print for some time. The reviews of that English edition attest to the importance of Ernesto Grassi’s work. By going back to the Italian humanist tradition and aspects of earlier Greek and Latin thought, Ernesto Grassi develops a conception of rhetoric as the basis of philosophy. Grassi explores the sense in which the first principles of rational thought come from the metaphorical power of the word. He finds (...)
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  41.  11
    Sonja Tanner (2010). In Praise of Plato's Poetic Imagination. Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- A history of the ancient "quarrel" : the philosophical "side" -- On the "side" of poetry in the ancient "quarrel" -- Imagination in the Sophist -- The pharmacological structure of the imagination -- The unity of form and content in Platonic dialogues -- Imagination and the ancient "quarrel".
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  42. Jeanine Grenberg (2007). Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):335-336.
    Jeanine Grenberg - Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 335-336 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Jeanine M. Grenberg St. Olaf College Bernard Freydberg. Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. Bloomington-Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2005. Pp. xiii + 180. Paper, $19.95. At the heart of the task of the historian of philosophy is the effort to interpret well (...)
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  43.  30
    Koen Vermeir (2004). The 'Physical Prophet' and the Powers of the Imagination. Part I: A Case-Study on Prophecy, Vapours and the Imagination (1685–1710). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (4):561-591.
    I argue that the imagination was a crucial concept for the understanding of marvellous phenomena, divination and magic in general. Exploring a debate on prophecy at the turn of the seventeenth century, I show that four explanatory categories were consistently evoked and I elucidate the role of the imagination in each of them. I introduce the term ‘floating concept’ to conceptualise the different ways in which the imagination and the related ‘animal spirits’ were understood in diverse discourses. (...)
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  44.  9
    Koen Vermeir (2005). The 'Physical Prophet' and the Powers of the Imagination. Part II: A Case-Study on Dowsing and the Naturalisation of the Moral, 1685–1710. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):1-24.
    In the first paper of this pair, I argued the importance of theories of the imagination in debates on divination [Vermeir, K. . The ‘physical prophet’ and the powers of the imagination. Part I: A case-study on prophecy, vapours and the imagination . Studies in History and Philosophy of Science C, 35, 561–591]. In the present article, I will rely on these results in order to unearth the role of the imagination in a discussion on (...)
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  45.  31
    Robert M. Burns (2006). Collingwood, Bradley, and Historical Knowledge. History and Theory 45 (2):178–203.
    The central feature of the narrative structure of Collingwood’s The Idea of History is the pivotal role accorded to Bradley, evident in the table of contents and in the two discussions of him. Few readers have noticed that, confusingly, the book’s first discussion of Bradley is a revision of the Inaugural Lecture “The Historical Imagination,” which constitutes the book’s second discussion of Bradley . The differences between these two presentations of Bradley are significant. The 1935 account seeks to (...)
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  46. Irving Babbitt (1960). On Being Creative. New York, Biblo and Tannen.
     
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  47. Bernard Williams (2000). Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline. Philosophy 75 (4):477-496.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline , Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why Williams was (...)
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  48.  53
    William H. Dray (1995). History as Re-Enactment: R.G. Collingwood's Idea of History. Oxford University Press.
    This book explains and defends a central ideas in the theory of history put forward by R. G. Collingwood, perhaps the foremost philosopher of history in the 20th century. Professor Dray analyses critically the idea of re-enactment, explores the limits of its applicability, and determines its relationship to other key Collingwoodian ideas, such as the role of imagination in historical thinking, and the indispensability of a point of view.
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  49.  6
    Michael Witmore (2001). Culture of Accidents: Unexpected Knowledges in Early Modern England. Stanford University Press.
    Collapsing buildings, unexpected meetings in the marketplace, monstrous births, encounters with pirates at sea - these and other unforeseen 'accidents' at the turn of the seventeenth century in England acquired unprecedented significance in the early modern philosophical and cultural imagination. Drawing on intellectual history, cultural criticism, and rhetorical theory, this book chronicles the narrative transformation of 'accident' from a philosophical dead end to an astonishing occasion for revelation and wonder in early modern religious life, dramatic practice, and experimental (...)
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  50.  62
    Richard Brown & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2009). Terminator and Philosophy: I'll Be Back, Therefore I Am. John Wiley & Sons.
    A timely book that uses science fiction to provoke reflection and discussion on philosophical issues From the nature of mind to the ethics of AI and neural enhancement, science fiction thought experiments fire the philosophical imagination, encouraging us to think outside of the box about classic philosophical problems and even to envision new ones. Science Fiction and Philosophy explores puzzles about virtual reality, transhumanism, whether time travel is possible, the nature of artificial intelligence, and topics in neuroethics, among other (...)
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