Search results for 'Imaging' (try it on Scholar)

735 found
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  1.  95
    Barry Smith, Sivaram Arabandi, Mathias Brochhausen, Michael Calhoun, Paolo Ciccarese, Scott Doyle, Bernard Gibaud, Ilya Goldberg, Charles E. Kahn Jr, , James Overton, John Tomaszewski & Metin Gurcan (2015). Biomedical Imaging Ontologies: A Survey and Proposal for Future Work. Journal of Pathology Informatics 6 (37).
    Ontology is one strategy for promoting interoperability of heterogeneous data through consistent tagging. An ontology is a controlled structured vocabulary consisting of general terms (such as “cell” or “image” or “tissue” or “microscope”) that form the basis for such tagging. These terms are designed to represent the types of entities in the domain of reality that the ontology has been devised to capture; the terms are provided with logical defi nitions thereby also supporting reasoning over the tagged data. Aim: This (...)
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  2.  37
    Charles Weijer, Tommaso Bruni, Teneille Gofton, G. Bryan Young, Loretta Norton, Andrew Peterson & Adrian M. Owen (2015). Ethical Considerations in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Research in Acutely Comatose Patients. Brain:0-0.
    After severe brain injury, one of the key challenges for medical doctors is to determine the patient’s prognosis. Who will do well? Who will not do well? Physicians need to know this, and families need to do this too, to address choices regarding the continuation of life supporting therapies. However, current prognostication methods are insufficient to provide a reliable prognosis. -/- Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) holds considerable promise for improving the accuracy of prognosis in acute brain injury patients. (...)
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  3.  8
    Robert Rosenberger (2013). Mediating Mars: Perceptual Experience and Scientific Imaging Technologies. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (1):75-91.
    The philosophical tradition of phenomenology, with its focus on human bodily perception, can be used to explore the ways scientific instrumentation shapes a user’s experience. Building on Don Ihde’s account of technological embodiment, I develop a framework of concepts for articulating the experience of image interpretation in science. These concepts can be of practical value to the analysis of scientific debates over image interpretation for the ways they draw out the relationships between the image-making processes and the rival scientific explanations (...)
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  4.  34
    Juha Räikkä (2010). Brain Imaging and Privacy. Neuroethics 3 (1):5-12.
    I will argue that the fairly common assumption that brain imaging may compromise people’s privacy in an undesirable way only if moral crimes are committed is false. Sometimes persons’ privacy is compromised because of failures of privacy. A normal emotional reaction to failures of privacy is embarrassment and shame, not moral resentment like in the cases of violations of right to privacy. I will claim that if (1) neuroimaging will provide all kinds of information about persons’ inner life and (...)
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  5.  59
    George Darby & Jon Williamson (2011). Imaging Technology and the Philosophy of Causality. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):115-136.
    Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007) put forward the thesis that, at least in the health sciences, to establish the claim that C is a cause of E, one normally needs evidence of an underlying mechanism linking C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This epistemological thesis poses a problem for most current analyses of causality which, in virtue of analysing causality in terms of just one of mechanisms or (...)
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  6.  24
    Jon B. Eisenberg (2008). Schiavo on the Cutting Edge: Functional Brain Imaging and its Impact on Surrogate End-of-Life Decision-Making. Neuroethics 1 (2):75-83.
    The article addresses the potential impact of functional brain imaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography) on surrogate end-of-life decision-making in light of varying state-law definitions of consciousness, some of which define awareness behaviorally and others functionally. The article concludes that, in light of admonitions by neuroscientists that functional brain imaging cannot yet replace behavioral evaluation to determine the existence of consciousness, state legislatures, courts and drafters of written advance healthcare directives should consider (...)
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  7.  6
    Davi Johnson (2008). “How Do You Know Unless You Look?”: Brain Imaging, Biopower and Practical Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (3):147-161.
    Brain imaging is a persuasive visual rhetoric by which neuroscience is articulated as relevant to the construction and maintenance of desirable selves. In this essay, I describe how “brain-based self-help” literature disseminates neuroscientific vocabularies to public audiences. In this genre, brain images are an authoritative visual resource for translating neuroscience into a comprehensive program for living. I use Foucault’s discussion of biopower to describe the ways in which brain-based self-help literature enables self-constitution in a biosocial age where health is (...)
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  8.  24
    Hannah Fitsch (2012). (A)E(s)Th(Et)Ics of Brain Imaging. Visibilities and Sayabilities in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Neuroethics 5 (3):275-283.
    Producing and interpreting functional brain data is part of the negotiation we imagine our brain. To take a closer look at the idea of brain imaging as a form of visual knowledge, it is necessary to put the research of today into a historical context. In my article I will point to a specific approach of functional imaging which depends on historical shifts entangled with the visual aspect of producing pictures of the brain. I will bring out the (...)
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  9.  27
    Jon Williamson (2011). Imaging Technology and the Philosophy of Causality. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):115-136.
    Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007) put forward the thesis that, at least in the health sciences, to establish the claim that C is a cause of E, one normally needs evidence of an underlying mechanism linking C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This epistemological thesis poses a problem for most current analyses of causality which, in virtue of analysing causality in terms of just one of mechanisms or difference (...)
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  10.  3
    Nicolas Kopp (2009). How Technologies of Imaging Are Shaping Clinical Research and Practice in Neurology. Medicine Studies 1 (4):315-328.
    How Technologies of Imaging are Shaping Clinical Research and Practice in Neurology Content Type Journal Article Category Past & Present Pages 315-328 DOI 10.1007/s12376-010-0037-1 Authors Nicolas Kopp, Hôpital de l’HotelDieu Lyon University Hospitals, EspaceEthique Inter-régional 69288 Lyon, Cedex 02 France Journal Medicine Studies Online ISSN 1876-4541 Print ISSN 1876-4533 Journal Volume Volume 1 Journal Issue Volume 1, Number 4.
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  11.  12
    Lionel Naccache & Stanislas Dehaene (2001). The Priming Method: Imaging Unconscious Repetition Priming Reveals an Abstract Representation of Number in the Parietal Lobes. Cerebral Cortex 11 (10):966-974.
  12.  20
    B. J. Casey, N. Tottenham, C. Liston & S. Durston (2005). Imaging the Developing Brain: What Have We Learned About Cognitive Development? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):104-110.
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  13.  54
    Georg Northoff, Pengmin Qin & Todd E. Feinberg (2011). Brain Imaging of the Self–Conceptual, Anatomical and Methodological Issues. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):52–63.
    In this paper we consider two major issues: conceptual–experimental approaches to the self, and the neuroanatomical substrate of the self. We distinguish content- and processed-based concepts of the self that entail different experimental strategies, and anatomically, we investigate the concept of midline structures in further detail and present a novel view on the anatomy of an integrated subcortical–cortical midline system. Presenting meta-analytic evidence, we show that the anterior paralimbic, e.g. midline, regions do indeed seem to be specific for self-specific stimuli. (...)
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  14. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.
  15.  70
    James Bogen (2002). Epistemological Custard Pies From Functional Brain Imaging. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):S59-S71.
    This paper discusses features of an epistemically valuable form of evidence that raise troubles for received and new epistemological treatments of experimental evidence.
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  16.  3
    Chris Baeken, Jerome Brunelin, Romain Duprat & Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt (2016). The Application of tDCS in Psychiatric Disorders: A Brain Imaging View. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 6.
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  17.  5
    W. Struyve, W. De Baere, J. De Neve & S. De Weirdt (2004). On Peres' Statement “Opposite Momenta Lead to Opposite Directions,” Decaying Systems and Optical Imaging. Foundations of Physics 34 (6):963-985.
  18.  8
    Dirk Marwede & James Matthew Fielding (2007). Entities and Relations in Medical Imaging: An Analysis of Computed Tomography Reporting. Applied Ontology 2 (1):67-79.
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  19.  19
    Irmgard Müller & Heiner Fangerau (2010). Medical Imaging: Pictures, “as If” and the Power of Evidence. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):151-160.
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  20.  17
    James R. Kuehl (1970). Perceiving and Imaging. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (December):212-224.
  21.  2
    William P. Dempsey, Scott E. Fraser & Periklis Pantazis (2012). SHG Nanoprobes: Advancing Harmonic Imaging in Biology. Bioessays 34 (5):351-360.
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  22.  2
    Jeffrey M. Rothschild, Ramin Khorasani, Richard W. Hanson & Julie M. Fiskio (2002). Do Abnormal Liver Function Tests Predict Inpatient Imaging Yield? An Evaluation of Clinical Decision Making. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (4):397-406.
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  23. D. H. Ffytche (2000). Imaging Conscious Vision. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
  24.  27
    Judy Illes & Eric Racine (2005). Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty of (...)
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  25.  27
    Mark Povich (2015). Mechanisms and Model-Based Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Philosophy of Science 82 (5):1035-1046.
    Mechanistic explanations satisfy widely held norms of explanation: the ability to manipulate and answer counterfactual questions about the explanandum phenomenon. A currently debated issue is whether any nonmechanistic explanations can satisfy these explanatory norms. Weiskopf argues that the models of object recognition and categorization, JIM, SUSTAIN, and ALCOVE, are not mechanistic yet satisfy these norms of explanation. In this article I argue that these models are mechanism sketches. My argument applies recent research using model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, a (...)
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  26.  41
    M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). Toward a Unified Theory of Narcosis: Brain Imaging Evidence for a Thalamocortical Switch as the Neurophysiologic Basis of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):370-386.
    A unifying theory of general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness must explain the common mechanism through which various anesthetic agents produce unconsciousness. Functional-brain-imaging data obtained from 11 volunteers during general anesthesia showed specific suppression of regional thalamic and midbrain reticular formation activity across two different commonly used volatile agents. These findings are discussed in relation to findings from sleep neurophysiology and the implications of this work for consciousness research. It is hypothesized that the essential common neurophysiologic mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness is, as (...)
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  27.  30
    Debra A. Gusnard (2005). Being a Self: Considerations From Functional Imaging. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):679-697.
    Having a self is associated with important advantages for an organism.These advantages have been suggested to include mechanisms supporting elaborate capacities for planning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Acknowledging such functionality offers possibilities for obtaining traction on investigation of neural correlates of selfhood. A method that has potential for investigating some of the brain-based properties of self arising in behavioral contexts varying in requirements for such behavioral guidance and control is functional brain imaging. Data obtained with this method are beginning (...)
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  28.  18
    Alistair McFadyen (2012). Imaging God: A Theological Answer to the Anthropological Question? Zygon 47 (4):918-933.
    Traditionally the central trope in Christian theological anthropology, “the image of God” tends to function more as a noun than a verb. While that has grounded significant interplay between specific Christian formulations and the concepts of nontheological disciplines and cultural constructs, it facilitates the withdrawal of the image and of theological anthropology more broadly from the context of active relation with God. Rather than a static rendering of the image a more interactionist, dynamic, and relational view of “imaging God” (...)
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  29.  49
    Ingrid Richardson & Carly Harper (2006). Imaging the Visceral Soma : A Corporeal Feminist Interpretation. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (1).
    Feminist philosophers of technoscience have long argued that it is vital that we question biomedical and scientific claims to an immaterial and disembodied objectivity, and also, more specifically, that we disable the conception of medical visualising technologies as neutral or transparent conduits to the “fact” of the body. In this paper we suggest that corporeal feminism is well situated to provide such a critique. Feminist phenomenologists over the past decade have theorised embodiment in a number of critical ways, many deriving (...)
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  30.  19
    Andreea Smaranda Aldea (2013). Husserl's Struggle with Mental Images: Imaging and Imagining Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):371-394.
    Husserl’s extensive analyses of image consciousness (Bildbewusstsein) and of the imagination (Phantasie) offer insightful and detailed structural explications. However, despite this careful work, Husserl’s discussions fail to overcome the need to rely on a most problematic concept: mental images. The epistemological conundrums triggered by the conceptual framework of mental images are well known—we have only to remember the questions regarding knowledge acquisition that plagued British empiricism. Beyond these problems, however, a plethora of important questions arise from claiming that mental images (...)
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  31.  3
    Judy Illes, Raymond de Vries, Mildred Cho & Pam Schraedley-Desmond (2006). ELSI Priorities for Brain Imaging. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W24-W31.
    As one of the most compelling technologies for imaging the brain, functional MRI (fMRI) produces measurements and persuasive pictures of research subjects making cognitive judgments and even reasoning through difficult moral decisions. Even after centuries of studying the link between brain and behavior, this capability presents a number of novel significant questions. For example, what are the implications of biologizing human experience? How might neuroimaging disrupt the mysteries of human nature, spirituality, and personal identity? Rather than waiting for an (...)
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  32.  67
    Antti Revonsuo (2001). Can Functional Brain Imaging Discover Consciousness in the Brain? Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):3-23.
    If we assume that consciousness is a natural biological phenomenon in the brain, should we expect the current brain sensing and imaging methods to somehow ‘discover’ consciousness? The answer depends on the following points: What kind of level of biological organization do we assume consciousness to be? What would count as the discovery of this level? What are the levels of organization from which the currently available research instruments pick signals and acquire data? Single-cell recordings, PET, fMRI, EEG and (...)
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  33. D. Kirklin (2004). The Role of Medical Imaging in the Abortion Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):426-426.
    Deborah Kirklin discusses the role of medical imaging in the abortion debateThe latest developments in fetal ultrasound technology, made public by a group called Create,1 and first introduced to the wider UK public by the Evening Standard newspaper reporter Isabel Oakeshott in September 2003 and again in July 2004, have evoked a flood of responses from the public, pro-life and pro-choice campaigners, and politicians, re-igniting the debate about abortion in the UK and elsewhere. The focus of the Evening Standard (...)
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  34.  21
    Martin Ruivenkamp & Arie Rip (2011). Entanglement of Imaging and Imagining of Nanotechnology. NanoEthics 5 (2):185-193.
    Images, ranging from visualizations of the nanoscale to future visions, abound within and beyond the world of nanotechnology. Rather than the contrast between imaging , i.e. creating images that are understood as offering a view on what is out there, and imagining , i.e. creating images offering impressions of how the nanoscale could look like and images presenting visions of worlds that might be realized, it is the entanglement between imaging and imagining which is the key to understanding (...)
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  35.  7
    Britta Schinzel (2006). The Body in Medical Imaging Between Reality and Construction. Poiesis and Praxis 4 (3):185-198.
    Medical imaging has provided insight into the living body that were not possible beforehand. With these methods a revolution in medical diagnosis and biomedical research has begun. Problematic aspects on the other hand are arising from the highly constructive properties of image production, which use complicated physical and physiological effects. Images are established via highly complicated combinations of technology and contingently chosen mathematical and algorithmic solutions. In addition, image construction follows properties of the human visual and cognitive system to (...)
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  36.  12
    N. Hoggard, G. Darwent, D. Capener, I. D. Wilkinson & P. D. Griffiths (2009). The High Incidence and Bioethics of Findings on Magnetic Resonance Brain Imaging of Normal Volunteers for Neuroscience Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):194-199.
    Background: We were finding volunteers for functional magnetic resonance imaging studies with abnormalities requiring referral surprisingly frequently. The bioethics surrounding the incidental findings are not straightforward and every imaging institution will encounter this situation in their normal volunteers. Yet the implications for the individuals involved may be profound. Should all participants have review of their imaging by an expert and who should be informed? Methods: The normal volunteers that were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR) which were reviewed (...)
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  37.  12
    Amihud Gilead (2015). Can Brain Imaging Breach Our Mental Privacy? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (2):275-291.
    Brain-imaging technologies have posed the problem of breaching our brain privacy. Until the invention of those technologies, many of us entertained the idea that nothing can threaten our mental privacy, as long as we kept it, for each of us has private access to his or her own mind but no access to any other. Yet, philosophically, the issue of private, mental accessibility appears to be quite unsettled, as there are still many philosophers who reject the idea of private, (...)
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  38.  43
    M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier, J. H. Fallon & S. J. Barker (1996). PET Imaging of Conscious and Unconscious Verbal Memory. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):448-62.
    One method for investigating the neurobiology of consciousness is to experimentally manipulate consciousness as a variable and then visualize the resultant functional brain changes with advanced imaging techniques. To begin investigation into this area, healthy volunteers underwent positron emission tomography scanning while listening to randomized word lists in both conscious and unconscious conditions. Following anaesthesia, subjects had no explicit memories. Nonetheless, subjects demonstrated implicit memory on a forced-choice test . These subsequent memory scores were correlated with regional brain metabolism (...)
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  39.  4
    Charles A. Nelson (2008). Incidental Findings in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Brain Research. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (2):315-319.
    The use of magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain structure and function has become increasingly common among neuroscientists, psychologists, and even economists in recent years. Yet, despite this increase in use, relatively little attention has been paid to the issue of incidental fndings. The current paper discusses these issues, and anticipates the future of incidental fndings in the context of other neuroimaging tools currently being used to investigate the living brain.
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  40.  15
    E. A. Maguire (1997). The Cerebral Representation of Space: Insights From Functional Imaging Data. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (2):62-68.
    Functional imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, present a unique opportunity to examine, in humans, the cerebral representation of space in vivo. Space is ubiquitous and not a unitary phenomenon, and the brain uses visual, vestibular and proprioceptive inputs to produce multiple representations of space subserving spatial cognition, ranging from gaze control to remembering multiple complex large-scale environments. Functional imaging studies have shown the importance of the parietal cortex in perceptual, motor, (...)
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  41.  15
    Josef Pfeuffer, High-Resolution 1H Chemical Shift Imaging in the Monkey Visual Cortex.
    Functionally distinct anatomic subdivisions of the brain can often be only a few millimeters in one or more dimensions. The study of metabolic differences in such structures by means of localized in vivo MR spectroscopy is therefore challenging, if not impossible. In fact, the spatial resolution of chemical shift imaging (CSI) in humans is typically in the range of centimeters. The aim of the present study was to optimize 1H CSI in monkeys and demonstrate the feasibility of high spatial (...)
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  42.  11
    Marc Slors & Nina Azari (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we call into question (...)
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  43.  1
    Christopher D. Frith (2001). Commentary on Revonsuo's Can Functional Brain Imaging Discover Consciousness in the Brain?. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):30.
    Antti Revonsuo has given us an engaging and deliberately provocative paper discussing the value of brain imaging in the search for the neural basis of consciousness. In some places, however, his enthusiasm for the controversial nature of the topic has led him to overstate or misdirect his case.
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  44.  25
    Amy E. White (2010). The Lie of Fmri: An Examination of the Ethics of a Market in Lie Detection Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (3):253-266.
    In this paper, I argue that companies who use functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans for lie detection encounter the same basic ethical stumbling blocks as commercial companies that market traditional polygraphs. Markets in traditional voluntary polygraphs are common and fail to elicit much uproar among ethicists. Thus, for consistency, if markets in polygraphs are ethically unproblematic, markets using fMRIs for lie detection are equally as acceptable. Furthermore, while I acknowledge two substantial differences between the ethical concerns involving polygraphs (...)
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  45.  8
    Bill Faw (2009). Conflicting Intuitions May Be Based on Differing Abilities: Evidence From Mental Imaging Research. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):45-68.
    Much of the current imaging literature either denies the existence of wakeful non-mental imagers, views non-imagers motivationally as 'repressors' or 'neurotic', or acknowledges them but does not fully incorporate them into their models. Neurobiologists testing for imaging loss seem to assume that visual recognition, describing objects, and free-hand drawing require the forming of conscious images. The intuition that 'the psyche never thinks without an image.... the reasoning mind thinks its ideas in the form of images' (Aristotle) has a (...)
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  46.  31
    J. Panksepp & N. Gordon (2003). The Instinctual Basis of Human Affect: Affective Imaging of Laughter and Crying. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):197-205.
    The goal of this study was to evaluate affective changes induced during mental imaging of instinctual action patterns. Subjects were first trained to simulate the bodily rhythms of laughter and crying and were then trained to image these processes without any movement. The mere imagination of the motor imagery of laughter and crying were sufficient to significantly facilitate happy and sad mood ratings as monitored by subjective self-report. In contrast, no changes in mood were reported while imaging the (...)
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  47.  7
    Roger Brownsword (2012). Regulating Brain Imaging : Questions of Privacy, Informed Consent, and Human Dignity. In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press 223.
  48.  29
    Bernard J. Baars (2001). How Could Brain Imaging Not Tell Us About Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (3):24-29.
    Revonsuo argues that current brain imaging methods do not allow us to ‘discover’ consciousness. While all observational methods in science have limitations, consciousness is such a massive and pervasive phenomenon that we cannot fail to observe its effects at every level of brain organization: molecular, cellular, electrical, anatomical, metabolic, and even the ‘higher levels of electrophysiological organization that are crucial for the empirical discovery and theoretical explanation of consciousness’ . Indeed, the first major discovery in that respect was Hans (...)
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  49.  7
    Nina P. Azari & Marc Slors (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we call into question (...)
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  50.  20
    Serge Goldman, Brain Imaging.
    While philosophers have, for centuries, pondered upon the relation between mind and brain, neuroscientists have only recently been able to explore the connection analytically — to peer inside the black box. This ability stems from recent advances in technology and emerging neuroimaging modalities. It is now possible not only to produce remarkably detailed images of the brain’s structure (i.e. anatomical imaging) but also to capture images of the physiology associated with mental processes (i.e. functional imaging). We are able (...)
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