Search results for 'Imitation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Machiel Keestra (2008). The Diverging Force of Imitation. Integrating Cognitive Science and Hermeneutics. Review of General Psychology 12 (2):127-136.score: 18.0
    Recent research on infant and animal imitation and on mirror neuron systems has
    brought imitation back in focus in psychology and cognitive science. This topic has
    always been important for philosophical hermeneutics as well, focusing on theory and
    method of understanding. Unfortunately, relations between the scientific and the
    hermeneutic approaches to imitation and understanding have scarcely been investigated,
    to the loss of both disciplines. In contrast to the cognitive scientific emphasis on
    sharing and convergence of representations, the hermeneutic analysis emphasizes the
    indeterminacy and openness (...)
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  2. Susan L. Hurley (2008). The Shared Circuits Model. How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation and Mind Reading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.score: 18.0
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is (...)
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  3. Jamie Cullen (2009). Imitation Versus Communication: Testing for Human-Like Intelligence. Minds and Machines 19 (2):237-254.score: 18.0
    Turing’s Imitation Game is often viewed as a test for theorised machines that could ‘think’ and/or demonstrate ‘intelligence’. However, contrary to Turing’s apparent intent, it can be shown that Turing’s Test is essentially a test for humans only. Such a test does not provide for theorised artificial intellects with human-like, but not human-exact, intellectual capabilities. As an attempt to bypass this limitation, I explore the notion of shifting the goal posts of the Turing Test, and related tests such as (...)
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  4. Talia Welsh (2006). Do Neonates Display Innate Self-Awareness? Why Neonatal Imitation Fails to Provide Sufficient Grounds for Innate Self-and Other-Awareness. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):221-238.score: 18.0
    Until the 1970s, models of early infancy tended to depict the young child as internally preoccupied and incapable of processing visual-tactile data from the external world. Meltzoff and Moore's groundbreaking studies of neonatal imitation disprove this characterization of early life: They suggest that the infant is cognizant of its external environment and is able to control its own body. Taking up these experiments, theorists argue that neonatal imitation provides an empirical justification for the existence of an innate ability (...)
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  5. Y. Sato & T. Ikegami (2004). Undecidability in the Imitation Game. Minds and Machines 14 (2):133-43.score: 18.0
    This paper considers undecidability in the imitation game, the so-called Turing Test. In the Turing Test, a human, a machine, and an interrogator are the players of the game. In our model of the Turing Test, the machine and the interrogator are formalized as Turing machines, allowing us to derive several impossibility results concerning the capabilities of the interrogator. The key issue is that the validity of the Turing test is not attributed to the capability of human or machine, (...)
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  6. Richard P. Cooper, Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes (2013). Are Automatic Imitation and Spatial Compatibility Mediated by Different Processes? Cognitive Science 37 (4):605-630.score: 18.0
    Automatic imitation or “imitative compatibility” is thought to be mediated by the mirror neuron system and to be a laboratory model of the motor mimicry that occurs spontaneously in naturalistic social interaction. Imitative compatibility and spatial compatibility effects are known to depend on different stimulus dimensions—body movement topography and relative spatial position. However, it is not yet clear whether these two types of stimulus–response compatibility effect are mediated by the same or different cognitive processes. We present an interactive activation (...)
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  7. Richard W. Byrne & Anne E. Russon (1998). Learning by Imitation: A Hierarchical Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):667-684.score: 18.0
    To explain social learning without invoking the cognitively complex concept of imitation, many learning mechanisms have been proposed. Borrowing an idea used routinely in cognitive psychology, we argue that most of these alternatives can be subsumed under a single process, priming, in which input increases the activation of stored internal representations. Imitation itself has generally been seen as a This has diverted much research towards the all-or-none question of whether an animal can imitate, with disappointingly inconclusive results. In (...)
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  8. Richard Moore (2013). Imitation and Conventional Communication. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.score: 18.0
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts (...)
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  9. Brian P. Bloomfield & Theo Vurdubakis (2003). Imitation Games: Turing, Menard, Van Meegeren. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 5 (1):27-38.score: 18.0
    For many, the very idea of an artificialintelligence has always been ethicallytroublesome. The putative ability of machinesto mimic human intelligence appears to callinto question the stability of taken forgranted boundaries between subject/object,identity/similarity, free will/determinism,reality/simulation, etc. The artificiallyintelligent object thus appears to threaten thehuman subject with displacement and redundancy.This article takes as its starting point AlanTuring''s famous ''imitation game,'' (the socalled ''Turing Test''), here treated as aparable of the encounter between human originaland machine copy – the born and the made. (...)
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  10. Patti Adank, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer & Harold Bekkering (2013). The Role of Accent Imitation in Sensorimotor Integration During Processing of Intelligible Speech. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Recent theories on how listeners maintain perceptual invariance despite variation in the speech signal allocate a prominent role to imitation mechanisms. Notably, these simulation accounts propose that motor mechanisms support perception of ambiguous or noisy signals. Indeed, imitation of ambiguous signals, e.g., accented speech, has been found to aid effective speech comprehension. Here, we explored the possibility that imitation in speech benefits perception by increasing activation in speech perception and production areas. Participants rated the intelligibility of sentences (...)
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  11. Scott Atran (2001). The Trouble with Memes: Inference Versus Imitation in Cultural Creation. Human Nature 12 (4):351-381.score: 18.0
    Memes are hypothetical cultural units passed on by imitation; although nonbiological, they undergo Darwinian selection like genes. Cognitive study of multimodular human minds undermines memetics: unlike in genetic replication, high-fidelity transmission of cultural information is the exception, not the rule. Constant, rapid 'mutation' of information during communication generates endlessly varied creations that nevertheless adhere to modular input conditions. The sort of cultural information most susceptible to modular processing is that most readily acquired by children, most easily transmitted across individuals, (...)
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  12. Philip S. Gerrans (2013). Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning. Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.score: 18.0
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the (...)
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  13. Angèle Brunellière Noël Nguyen, Sophie Dufour (2012). Does Imitation Facilitate Word Recognition in a Non-Native Regional Accent? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    We asked to what extent phonetic convergence across speakers may facilitate later word recognition. Northern-French participants showed both a clear phonetic convergence effect towards Southern French in a word-repetition task, and a bias towards the phonemic system of their own variety in the recognition of single words. Perceptual adaptation to a non-native accent may be difficult when the native accent has a phonemic contrast that is associated with a single phonemic category in the non-native accent. Convergence towards a speaker of (...)
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  14. Kirsten E. Bevelander, Anna Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Doeschka J. Anschütz, Roel C. J. Hermans & Rutger C. M. E. Engels (2013). Imitation of Snack Food Intake Among Normal-Weight and Overweight Children. Frontiers in Psychology 4:949.score: 18.0
    This study investigated whether social modeling of palatable food intake might partially be explained by the direct imitation of a peer reaching for snack food and, further, assessed the role of the children’s own weight status on their likelihood of imitation during the social interaction. Real-time observations during a 10-minute play situation in which 68 participants (27.9% overweight) interacted with normal-weight confederates (instructed peers) were conducted. Children’s imitated and non-imitated responses to the confederate’s food picking movements were compared (...)
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  15. Markus Christiner & Susanne Maria Reiterer (2013). Song and Speech: Examining the Link Between Singing Talent and Speech Imitation Ability. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    In previous research on speech imitation, musicality and an ability to sing were isolated as the strongest indicators of good pronunciation skills in foreign languages. We, therefore, wanted to take a closer look at the nature of the ability to sing, which shares a common ground with the ability to imitate speech. This study focuses on whether good singing performance predicts good speech imitation. Fourty-one singers of different levels of proficiency were selected for the study and their ability (...)
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  16. Norbert Zmyj David Buttelmann (2012). Evaluating the Empirical Evidence for the Two-Stage-Model of Infant Imitation. A Commentary on Paulus, Hunnius, Vissers, and Bekkering (2011). Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Evaluating the empirical evidence for the two-stage-model of infant imitation. A commentary on Paulus, Hunnius, Vissers, and Bekkering (2011).
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  17. Marc Sato Maëva Garnier, Laurent Lamalle (2013). Neural Correlates of Phonetic Convergence and Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Speakers unconsciously tend to mimic their interlocutor's speech during communicative interaction. This study aims at examining the neural correlates of phonetic convergence and deliberate imitation, in order to explore whether imitation of phonetic features, deliberate, or unconscious, might reflect a sensory-motor recalibration process. Sixteen participants listened to vowels with pitch varying around the average pitch of their own voice, and then produced the identified vowels, while their speech was recorded and their brain activity was imaged using fMRI. Three (...)
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  18. Noël Nguyen, Sophie Dufour & Angèle Brunellière (2012). Does Imitation Facilitate Word Recognition in a Non-Native Regional Accent? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    We asked to what extent phonetic convergence across speakers may facilitate later word recognition. Northern-French participants showed both a clear phonetic convergence effect towards Southern French in a word-repetition task, and a bias towards the phonemic system of their own variety in the recognition of single words. Perceptual adaptation to a non-native accent may be difficult when the native accent has a phonemic contrast that is associated with a single phonemic category in the non-native accent. Convergence towards a speaker of (...)
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  19. Anne J. Olmstead, Navin Viswanathan, M. Pilar Aivar & Sarath Manuel (2013). Comparison of Native and Non-Native Phone Imitation by English and Spanish Speakers. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (July).score: 18.0
    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]-[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long (...)
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  20. Marie Postma-Nilsenová & Eric Postma (2013). Auditory Perception Bias in Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    In an experimental study, we explored the role of auditory perception bias in vocal pitch imitation. In line with neuroanatomical differences in the lateral Heschl's gyrus, some listeners show an auditory perception bias for the sound as a whole which facilitates their perception of the fundamental frequency (the primary acoustic correlate of pitch). Other listeners focus on the harmonic constituents of the complex sound signal which may hamper the perception of the fundamental. These two listener types are referred to (...)
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  21. Nandini C. Singh Susanne M. Reiterer, Xiaochen Hu, T. A. Sumathi (2013). Are You a Good Mimic? Neuro-Acoustic Signatures for Speech Imitation Ability. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. 138 German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for “speech imitation ability” in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorised into “high ” and “low ability” groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to “imitate“ sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English and (...)
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  22. Jochen Triesch (2013). Imitation Learning Based on an Intrinsic Motivation Mechanism for Efficient Coding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML) for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued (...)
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  23. Pascal Vrticka, Samanta Simioni, Eleonora Fornari, Myriam Schluep, Patrik Vuilleumier & David Sander (2013). Neural Substrates of Social Emotion Regulation: A fMRI Study on Imitation and Expressive Suppression to Dynamic Facial Signals. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Emotion regulation is crucial for successfully engaging in social interactions. Yet, little is known about the neural mechanisms controlling behavioral responses to emotional expressions perceived in the face of other people, which constitute a key element of interpersonal communication. Here, we investigated brain systems involved in social emotion perception and regulation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 20 healthy participants who saw dynamic facial expressions of either happiness or sadness, and were asked to either imitate the expression or to (...)
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  24. Rik Wehrens (forthcoming). The Potential of the Imitation Game Method in Exploring Healthcare Professionals' Understanding of the Lived Experiences and Practical Challenges of Chronically Ill Patients. Health Care Analysis:1-19.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the potential and relevance of an innovative sociological research method known as the Imitation Game for research in health care. Whilst this method and its potential have until recently only been explored within sociology, there are many interesting and promising facets that may render this approach fruitful within the health care field, most notably to questions about the experiential knowledge or ‘expertise’ of chronically ill patients (and the extent to which different health care professionals are able (...)
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  25. Norbert Zmyj, Gisa Aschersleben, Wolfgang Prinz & Moritz Daum (2012). The Peer Model Advantage in Infants' Imitation of Familiar Gestures Performed by Differently Aged Models. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Research on infant´s imitation of differently aged models, which has predominantly studied object- related actions, has so far lead to mixed evidence. Whereas some studies reported an increased likelihood of imitating peer models in contrast to adult models, other studies reported the opposite pattern of results. In the present study, 14-month-old infants were presented with four familiar gestures (e.g., clapping) that were demonstrated by differently aged televised models (peer, older child, adult). Results revealed that infants were more likely to (...)
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  26. Caroline Catmur & Cecilia Heyes (2013). Is It What You Do, or When You Do It? The Roles of Contingency and Similarity in Pro‐Social Effects of Imitation. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1541-1552.score: 16.0
    Being imitated has a wide range of pro-social effects, but it is not clear how these effects are mediated. Naturalistic studies of the effects of being imitated have not established whether pro-social outcomes are due to the similarity and/or the contingency between the movements performed by the actor and those of the imitator. Similarity is often assumed to be the active ingredient, but we hypothesized that contingency might also be important, as it produces positive affect in infants and can be (...)
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  27. Hermann Ackermann Susanne Maria Reiterer, Xiaochen Hu, Michael Erb, Giuseppina Rota, Davide Nardo, Wolfgang Grodd, Susanne Winkler (2011). Individual Differences in Audio-Vocal Speech Imitation Aptitude in Late Bilinguals: Functional Neuro-Imaging and Brain Morphology. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 16.0
    An unanswered question in adult language learning or late bi- and multilingualism is why individuals show marked differences in their ability to imitate foreign accents. While recent research acknowledges that more adults than previously assumed can still acquire a “native” foreign accent, very little is known about the neuro-cognitive correlates of this special ability. We investigated 140 German speaking individuals displaying varying degrees of “mimicking” capacity, based on natural language text, sentence and word imitations either in their second language English (...)
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  28. Keith Gunderson (1964). The Imitation Game. Mind 73 (April):234-45.score: 15.0
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  29. Gualtiero Piccinini (2000). Turing's Rules for the Imitation Game. Minds and Machines 10 (4):573-582.score: 15.0
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  30. John G. Stevenson (1976). On the Imitation Game. Philosophia 6 (March):131-33.score: 15.0
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  31. Eric Russert Kraemer (1980). Imitation-Man and the 'New' Epiphenomenalism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (September):479-487.score: 15.0
  32. Susan G. Sterrett (2002). Nested Algorithms and the Original Imitation Game Test: A Reply to James Moor. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 12 (1):131-136.score: 15.0
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  33. Ellen Fridland (2013). Imitation, Skill Learning, and Conceptual Thought: An Embodied, Developmental Approach. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 203--224.score: 15.0
  34. Huma Shah & Kevin Warwick (2010). Testing Turing's Parallel-Paired Imitation Game. Kybernetes 39 (3).score: 15.0
    The purpose of this paper is to consider Turing's two tests for machine intelligence: the parallel-paired, three-participants game presented in his 1950 paper, and the “jury-service” one-to-one measure described two years later in a radio broadcast. Both versions were instantiated in practical Turing tests during the 18th Loebner Prize for artificial intelligence hosted at the University of Reading, UK, in October 2008. This involved jury-service tests in the preliminary phase and parallel-paired in the final phase.
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  35. Chiara Gambi & Martin J. Pickering (2013). Prediction and Imitation in Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  36. Patti Adank, Andrew J. Stewart, Louise Connell & Jeffrey Wood (2013). Accent Imitation Positively Affects Language Attitudes. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  37. Sophie Dufour & Noël Nguyen (2013). How Much Imitation is There in a Shadowing Task? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  38. Claudia Canevari, Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2013). Modeling Speech Imitation and Ecological Learning of Auditory-Motor Maps. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  39. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 301-337.score: 15.0
  40. Karen J. Kaplan (1972). Vicarious Reinforcement and Model's Behavior in Verbal Learning and Imitation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):448.score: 15.0
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  41. Robert E. Phillips (1969). "Vicarious Reinforcement and Imitation in a Verbal Learning Situation": Erratum. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3, Pt.1):524-524.score: 15.0
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  42. Milton E. Rosenbaum & Irving F. Tucker (1962). The Competence of the Model and the Learning of Imitation and Non-Imitation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):183.score: 15.0
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  43. Ananta Charana Sukla (1977). The Concept of Imitation in Greek and Indian Aesthetics. Rupa.score: 15.0
     
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  44. Harold Ogden White (1935). Plagiarism and Imitation During the English Renaissance. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.score: 15.0
     
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  45. Susan Hurley (2008). The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.score: 12.0
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, (...)
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  46. Beata Stawarska (2009). Merleau-Ponty and Sartre in Response to Cognitive Studies of Facial Imitation. Philosophy Compass 4 (2):312-328.score: 12.0
    I examine the phenomenological philosophies of Merleau-Ponty and Sartre as possible responses to contemporary studies of interpersonal relatedness in cognitive science, especially the experimental studies of infant's imitating simple facial gestures of adults. I discuss the implications and the challenges raised by the experimental studies to the dominant phenomenological accounts of intersubjectivity, but also envision how phenomenology may help to interpret the findings about infantile imitation in ways that favor the embodied perceptual connectedness between the self and the other, (...)
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  47. Alessia Tessari & Anna M. Borghi (2007). Body Image and Body Schema: The Shared Representation of Body Image and the Role of Dynamic Body Schema in Perspective and Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):221-222.score: 12.0
    Our commentary addresses two issues that are not developed enough in the target article. First, the model does not clearly address the distinction among external objects, external body parts, and internal bodies. Second, the authors could have discussed further the role of body schema with regard to its dynamic character, and its role in perspective and in imitation.
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  48. Susan Blackmore, Evolution and Memes: The Human Brain as a Selective Imitation Device.score: 12.0
    The meme is an evolutionary replicator, defined as information copied from person to person by imitation. I suggest that taking memes into account may provide a better understanding of human evolution in the following way. Memes appeared in human evolution when our ancestors became capable of imitation. From this time on two replicators, memes and genes, coevolved. Successful memes changed the selective environment, favouring genes for the ability to copy them. I have called this process memetic drive. Meme-gene (...)
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  49. Eric Brandon (2001). Hobbes and the Imitation of God. Inquiry 44 (2):223 – 226.score: 12.0
    This note discusses the implications of an incorrect quotation that appeared in Ted H. Miller's article, 'Thomas Hobbes and the Constraints that Enable the Imitation of God', from Inquiry 42.2 (1999). Although surely inadvertent, this error is significant because the author uses it to support the thesis that Hobbes envisions philosophers imitating God by creating order out of chaos. The correct quotation from Leviathan does not support such a thesis, and the paragraph in Leviathan from which it (...)
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  50. Nicholas Shea (2009). Imitation as an Inheritance System. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 364:2429-2443.score: 12.0
    What is the evolutionary significance of the various mechanisms of imitation, emulation and social learning found in humans and other animals? This paper presents an advance in the theoretical resources for addressing that question, in the light of which standard approaches from the cultural evolution literature should be refocused. The central question is whether humans have an imitationbased inheritance system—a mechanism that has the evolutionary function of transmitting behavioural phenotypes reliably down the generations. To have the evolutionary power of (...)
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