Search results for 'Imitation (in art' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  11
    Iredell Jenkins (1942). Imitation and Expression in Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):42-52.
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  2.  8
    J. C. McKeown (1978). Ovidian Imitatio Kathleen Morgan: Ovid's Art of Imitation: Propertius in the Amoves. Pp. 116. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1977. Paper, Fl. 32.1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):253-254.
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  3.  6
    Roger Ling (1987). W. Tronzo: The Via Latina Catacomb. Imitation and Discontinuity in Fourth-Century Roman Painting. (Monographs on the Fine Arts Sponsored by the College Art Association of America, 38.) Pp. Xiv + 88; 114 Figs. Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1986. $30. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):328-.
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  4. H. E. Matthews & Goran Sorbom (1967). Mimesis and Art: Studies in the Origin and Early Development of an Aesthetic Vocabulary. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (69):377.
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  5.  11
    J. Tate (1928). 'Imitation' in Plato's Republic. Classical Quarterly 22 (1):16-23.
    It has become a standing reproach upon Plato's treatment of poetry in the Republic that he forgets or misrepresents in the tenth book what he said in the third. According to the earlier discussion, poetry is required to perform important services in the ideal state; its subject-matter will make the young familiar with true doctrines ; its style will reflect the qualities proper to the character of guardian, and therefore—by the principle of imitation—induce and confirm such qualities in the (...)
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  6.  96
    Tom Huhn (1996). The Movement of Mimesis: Heidegger's 'Origin of the Work of Art' in Relation to Adorno and Lyotard. Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (4):45-69.
    Heidegger formulates the artwork's origin in a movement against the false motion of portrayal and repetition. The term mimesis is employed in the present essay to describe this origin and the means by which truth 'happens', specifically when mimesis turns against itself as imitation. The movement of the artwork is considered within the following constellation: the concept of mimesis is examined in light of Heidegger's 'Origin' essay to illuminate the concept and the essay by placing both in relation to (...)
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  7.  48
    Donovan Miyasaki (2006). Art as Self-Origination in Winckelmann and Hegel. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (1):129-150.
    Eighteenth-century art historian Johann Joachim Winckelmann (1717-1768) shared with Hegel a profound admiration for the art and culture of ancient Greece. Both viewed ancient Greece as, in some sense, an ideal to which the modern world might aspire—a pinnacle of spiritual perfection and originality that contemporary civilization might, through an understanding of ancient Greek culture, one day equal or surpass. This rather competitive form of nostalgia suggests a paradoxical demand to produce an original and higher state of culture through the (...)
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  8. Patrick Greaney (2014). Quotational Practices: Repeating the Future in Contemporary Art. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Literature and art have always depended on imitation, and in the past few decades quotation and appropriation have become dominant aesthetic practices. But critical methods have not kept pace with this development. Patrick Greaney reopens the debate about quotation and appropriation, shifting away from naïve claims about the death of the author. In interpretations of art and literature from the 1960s to the present, _Quotational Practices _shows how artists and writers use quotation not to undermine authorship and originality, but (...)
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  9. Göran Sörbom (1966). Mimesis and Art. Stockholm, Svenska Bokförlaget (Bonnier).
     
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  10. Jan M. Broekman (1990). Darstellung Und Sinn Zur Bedeutung der Mimesis in Kunstphilosophie Und Psychiatrie.
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  11.  3
    Douglas Kelly (1987). The Imitation of Models and the Uses of Argumenta in Topical Invention. Argumentation 1 (4):365-377.
    Medieval literature is argumentative, since it argues for an idealized vision of reality acceptable to a proposed audience. Its narrative mode is description, performed according to the principles of the art of topical invention, derived from Cicero's De Inventione. The topoi or loci are features (circumstantiae) of a person or thing that are common to it as a class, such as tempus or locus for things. When filled out, according to the point of view desired by the author, public, context, (...)
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  12. Tom Huhn (2004). Imitation and Society: The Persistence of Mimesis in the Aesthetics of Burke, Hogarth, and Kant. Penn State University Press.
    This book reconsiders the fate of the doctrine of mimesis in the eighteenth century. Standard accounts of the aesthetic theories of this era hold that the idea of mimesis was supplanted by the far more robust and compelling doctrines of taste and aesthetic judgment. Since the idea of mimesis was taken to apply only in the relation of art to nature, it was judged to be too limited when the focus of aesthetics changed to questions about the constitution of individual (...)
     
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  13. Tom Huhn (2006). Imitation and Society: The Persistence of Mimesis in the Aesthetics of Burke, Hogarth, and Kant. Penn State University Press.
    This book reconsiders the fate of the doctrine of mimesis in the eighteenth century. Standard accounts of the aesthetic theories of this era hold that the idea of mimesis was supplanted by the far more robust and compelling doctrines of taste and aesthetic judgment. Since the idea of mimesis was taken to apply only in the relation of art to nature, it was judged to be too limited when the focus of aesthetics changed to questions about the constitution of individual (...)
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  14.  23
    Brian P. Bloomfield & Theo Vurdubakis (2003). Imitation Games: Turing, Menard, Van Meegeren. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 5 (1):27-38.
    For many, the very idea of an artificialintelligence has always been ethicallytroublesome. The putative ability of machinesto mimic human intelligence appears to callinto question the stability of taken forgranted boundaries between subject/object,identity/similarity, free will/determinism,reality/simulation, etc. The artificiallyintelligent object thus appears to threaten thehuman subject with displacement and redundancy.This article takes as its starting point AlanTuring''s famous ''imitation game,'' (the socalled ''Turing Test''), here treated as aparable of the encounter between human originaland machine copy – the born and the made. (...)
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  15. Charles A. McLaughlin (1954). A Note on "Imitation and Theme" in Literary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (2):267-270.
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  16. Andreas Becker (ed.) (2008). Mimikry: Gefährlicher Luxus Zwischen Natur Und Kultur. Edition Argus.
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  17.  56
    Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. Nai010 Publishers 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  18.  14
    Patrick Hutchings (2012). 'The Origin of the Work of Art': Heidegger. Sophia 51 (4):465-478.
    Professor Max Charlesworth and I worked, at Deakin University, on a course, 'Understanding Art'. Max was interested in the Social History of Art and in art as: 'giving form to mere matter'. Here 'form' might be read as 'lucid', 'exemplary', 'beautiful' etcetera. I am an Aristotle Poetics 4 man '… imitating something with the utmost veracity in a picture', and an Aristotle and John Cage man: 'Art is the imitation of nature in the manner of operation. Or a net'. (...)
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  19. G. Gebauer, C. Wulf & D. Reneau (1997). Mimesis: Culture-Art-Society. Philosophy East and West 47:291-292.
    Mimesis, the notion that art imitates reality, has long been recognized as one of the central ideas of Western aesthetics and has been most frequently associated with Aristotle. Less well documented is the great importance of mimetic theories of literature, theater, and the visual arts during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. In this book, the most comprehensive overview of the theory of mimesis since Auerbach's monumental study, Gunter Gebauer and Christoph Wulf provide a thorough introduction to the complex and shifting (...)
     
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  20.  14
    Stefan Ristic (2010). Identity of the Work of Art. Filozofija I Društvo 21 (2):293-308.
    The paper intends to determine the identity of the work of art in visual arts, music and literature. The discussion is of ontological nature. Particular attention is given to the problem of imitation of works of art in different arts, making a distinction between two types of imitation: fakes and forgeries. The first type is found only within the arts where the work of art is a singular physical object, i.e. with the so called autographic arts, whereas the (...)
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  21.  19
    Ann Astell (2013). “My Life is a Work of Art”. Renascence 65 (3):188-205.
    With reference to Wilde’s personal religious struggles, especially the suppression of his long-standing attraction to Roman Catholicism, this essay reads De Profundis, Picture of Dorian Gray, and “Ballad of Reading Gaol” as the author ‘s symbolic working out of his conversion, both spiritually and as a novelist. In the latter sense, the essay draws on the theory of Rene Girard regarding novelistic conversion: the artist’s “disavowal of the mimetic desire that has enslaved him to his models.” Since Christ is in (...)
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  22. Jad Hatem (2009). L'art comme phénoménologie de la subjectivité absolue. Studia Phaenomenologica 9:249-268.
    First we try to show that Henry’s philosophy of art meets Schelling’s ambition of exposing art as an organon of a philosophy of pathetic subjectivity (against the theory of imitation or reproduction). In this regard, Balzac’s novels serve as an illustration showing art to be the model of nature and not the other way round. Then Balzac’s main novel dealing with artistic creation, the Unknown Masterpiece, is interpreted using Henry’s grid, as an anticipation of Kandinsky’s abstraction.
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  23.  20
    Alexander R. Galloway (2013). Laruelle and Art. Continent 2 (4):230-236.
    In the early 1990s François Laruelle wrote an essay on James Turrell, the American artist known for his use of light and space. 1 While it briefly mentions Turrell's Roden Crater and is cognizant of his other work, the essay focuses on a series of twenty aquatint etchings made by Turrell called First Light (1989-1990). Designed to stand alone as prints, First Light nevertheless acts as a kind of backward glance revisiting and meditating on earlier corner light projections made by (...)
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  24.  47
    Martin Gammon (1997). "Exemplary Originality": Kant on Genius and Imitation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (4):563-592.
    "Exemplary Originality": Kant on Genius and Imitation MARTIN GAMMON 1. INTRODUCTION ACCORDING TO ERNST CASSIRER, Kant 's discussion of genius in the Third Cri- tique stands "at the crossroads of all aesthetic discussions in the eighteenth century," in that he tries to accommodate the neo-Classical demand that art- works follow determinate rules to the Romantic insistence that aesthetic cre- ativity be free from such rules? In the Third Critique itself, Kant defends both of these criteria through the doctrine of (...)
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  25.  72
    Arthur C. Danto (1998). The End of Art: A Philosophical Defense. History and Theory 37 (4):127–143.
    This essay constructs philosophical defenses against criticisms of my theory of the end of art. These have to do with the definition of art; the concept of artistic quality; the role of aesthetics; the relationship between philosophy and art; how to answer the question "But is it art?"; the difference between the end of art and "the death of painting"; historical imagination and the future; the method of using indiscernible counterparts, like Warhol's Brillo Box and the Brillo cartons it resembles; (...)
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  26.  63
    Werner Beierwaltes (2002). The Legacy of Neoplatonism in F. W. J. Schelling's Thought. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 10 (4):393 – 428.
    F.W.J. Schelling, one of the essential thinkers in the development of German Idealism, formed his own thought not only in a critical dialogue with Kant's and Fichte's transcendentalism and Hegel's earlier conception of thinking, but also in an intensive discussion with Plato and Aristotle. Over and above that, Neoplatonism - especially Plotinus, Proclus and the Christian Dionysius the Areopagite - played a decisive role in Schelling's reception and transformation of ancient philosophy.Selecting the manifold aspects which could be reflected on in (...)
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  27.  34
    Nickolas Pappas (2012). Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration? Philosophy Compass 7 (10):669-678.
    A passage in Plato’s Laws offers a fresh look at Plato’s theory of poetry and art. Only here does Plato call poetry both mimêsis “imitation, representation,” and the product of enthousiasmos “inspiration, possession.” The Republic and Sophist examine poetic imitation; the Ion and Phaedrus develop a theory of artistic inspiration; but Plato does not confront the two descriptions together outside this paragraph. After all, mimêsis fuels an attack on poetry, while enthousiasmos is sometimes used to attack it, sometimes (...)
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  28. Richard Thomas Eldridge (2003). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Art. Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Richard Eldridge presents a clear and compact survey of philosophical theories of the nature and significance of art. Drawing on materials from classical and contemporary philosophy as well as from literary theory and art criticism, he explores the representational, expressive, and formal dimensions of art, and he argues that works of art present their subject matter in ways that are of enduring cognitive, moral, and social interest. His discussion, illustrated with a wealth of examples, ranges over topics (...)
     
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  29.  31
    Susan Blackmore, : Imitation Makes Us Human.
    To be human is to imitate. This is a strong claim, and a contentious one. It implies that the turning point in hominid evolution was when our ancestors first began to copy each other’s sounds and actions, and that this new ability was responsible for transforming an ordinary ape into one with a big brain, language, a curious penchant for music and art, and complex cumulative culture. The argument, briefly, is this. All evolutionary processes depend on information being copied with (...)
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  30.  34
    Laurence Foss (1971). Art as Cognitive: Beyond Scientific Realism. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):234-250.
    Thesis: Art like science radically affects our perceiving and thinking, and the two are substantially alike in that together--along with an inherited "natural" language system with which they overlap--they enable us to articulate the world. Science has been advanced as the measure of all things: scientific realism. By implication, art pertains to beauty, science truth. Science effects conceptual break-throughs, changes our models of natural order. On the contrary (I argue), as a nonverbal symbol system art similarly affects paradigm-induced expectations. Substantively (...)
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  31.  21
    Garry Hagberg (1984). Aristotle's "Mimesis" and Abstract Art. Philosophy 59 (229):365 - 371.
    Does non-representational art itself constitute a refutation of any theory of art based upon mimesis or imitation? Our intuitions regarding this question seem to support an affirmative answer: it appears impossible to account for abstract and non-representational art in terms of imitation, because, to put the problem simply, if nothing is copied in a work of art then there can be nothing essentially imitative about it. The very notion of abstract imitative art seems self-contradictory.
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  32.  8
    I. Gaskell (2012). Spilt Ink: Aesthetic Globalization and Contemporary Chinese Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):1-16.
    In response to globalization, is there to be a single, homogeneous set of aesthetic values governing the production and consumption of art? I focus on a newcomer to globalized contemporary art, China, and argue that artworld art is far from the only art currently being produced. I describe four connected kinds of art currently made in China: Modernist, traditional, and avant-garde, which are artworld art, and mass commercial, which is not. Practices in all four conform to expectations globally that Chinese (...)
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  33. Walter L. Brenneman & Stanley O. Yarian (1990). The Seeing Eye: Hermeneutical Phenomenology in the Study of Religion. Penn State University Press.
    Establishing a link between phenomenology and hermeneutics as seen by philosophers and as applied by students of religion is the pioneering aim of this book. No existing book ties together the cross-disciplinary strands in a way that is useful for religious studies. A phenomenological and therefore hermeneutical approach to religion "prides itself on being aware of its own presuppositions and those of others that are brought to bear on data to be interpreted." Thus it "seeks to gain an access to (...)
     
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  34. Garry L. Hagberg (1984). "Mimesis" and Abstract Art. Philosophy 59:365.
    Does non-representational art itself constitute a refutation of any theory of art based upon mimesis or imitation? Our intuitions regarding this question seem to support an affirmative answer: it appears impossible to account for abstract and non-representational art in terms of imitation , because, to put the problem simply, if nothing is copied in a work of art then there can be nothing essentially imitative about it. The very notion of abstract imitative art seems self-contradictory.
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  35. Don Reneau (ed.) (1996). Mimesis: Culture—Art—Society. University of California Press.
    Mimesis, the notion that art imitates reality, has long been recognized as one of the central ideas of Western aesthetics and has been most frequently associated with Aristotle. Less well documented is the great importance of mimetic theories of literature, theater, and the visual arts during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. In this book, the most comprehensive overview of the theory of mimesis since Auerbach's monumental study, Gunter Gebauer and Christoph Wulf provide a thorough introduction to the complex and shifting (...)
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  36.  82
    Hans-Georg Gadamer (1986). The Relevance of the Beautiful and Other Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume makes available for the first time in English the most important of Hans-Georg Gadamer's extensive writings on art and literature. The principal text included is 'The Relevance of the Beautiful', Gadamer's most sustained treatment of philosophical aesthetics. The eleven other essays focus particularly on the challenge issued by modern painting and literature to our customary ideas of art, and use that challenge to revitalize our understanding of it. Gadamer demonstrates the continuing importance of such concepts as imitation, (...)
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  37.  1
    Brian O'Connor (2012). Adorno. Routledge.
    Theodor W. Adorno (1903-69) was one of the foremost philosophers and social theorists of the post-war period. Crucial to the development of Critical Theory, his highly original and distinctive but often difficult writings not only advance questions of fundamental philosophical significance, but provide deep-reaching analyses of literature, art, music sociology and political theory. -/- In this comprehensive introduction, Brian O’Connor explains Adorno’s philosophy for those coming to his work for the first time, through original new lines of interpretation. Beginning with (...)
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  38.  26
    Stephen Houlgate, Hegel's Aesthetics.
    G.W.F. Hegel's aesthetics, or philosophy of art, forms part of the extraordinarily rich German aesthetic tradition that stretches from J.J. Winckelmann's Thoughts on the Imitation of the Painting and Sculpture of the Greeks and G.E. Lessing's Laocoon through Immanuel Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgment and Friedrich Schiller's Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man to Friedrich Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy and Martin Heidegger's The Origin of the Work of Art and T.W. Adorno's Aesthetic Theory. Hegel was influenced (...)
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  39.  8
    Marguerite La Caze (2011). A Taste for Fashion. In Jessica Wolfendale & Jeanette Kennett (eds.), Fashion – Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking with Style. Blackwell
    One of the few philosophers who comments on fashion, Kant claims in his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View that fashion should be classified as vanity and foolishness. He writes ‘it is novelty that makes fashion popular, and to be inventive in all sorts of external forms, even if they often degenerate into something fantastic and somewhat hideous, belongs to the style of courtiers, especially ladies. Others then anxiously imitate these forms, and those in low social positions burden themselves (...)
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  40. Brian O'Connor (2012). Adorno. Routledge.
    Theodor W. Adorno was one of the foremost philosophers and social theorists of the post-war period. Crucial to the development of Critical Theory, his highly original and distinctive but often difficult writings not only advance questions of fundamental philosophical significance, but provide deep-reaching analyses of literature, art, music sociology and political theory. In this comprehensive introduction, Brian O’Connor explains Adorno’s philosophy for those coming to his work for the first time, through original new lines of interpretation. Beginning with an overview (...)
     
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  41. Celeste Olalquiaga (1998). The Artificial Kingdom: A Treasury of the Kitsch Experience. Pantheon Books.
    The Artificial Kingdom is the first book to provide a cultural history of kitsch, an immensely popular aesthetic phenomenon that has always been disdained as "bad taste," or a cheap imitation of art. Proposing instead that kitsch is the product of a larger sensibility of loss, Celeste Olalquiaga shows how it enables the momentary re-creation of experiences that exist only as memories or fantasies. Simultaneously exposing and celebrating this process, Olalquiaga gives us a bold, trenchant analysis of what and (...)
     
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  42. Magdalena Nowak (2011). The Complicated History of Einfühlung. ARGUMENT 1 (2):301-326.
    The article analyses the history of the Einfühlung concept. Theories of ‘feeling into’ Nature, works of art or feelings and behaviours of other persons by German philosophers of the second half of the nineteenth century Robert and Friedrich Vischer and Theodor Lipps are evoked, as well as similar theory of understanding (Verstehen) by Wilhelm Dilthey and Friedrich Schleiermacher, to which Dilthey refers. The meaning of the term Einfühlung within Edith Stein’s thought is also analysed. Both Einfühlung and Verstehen were criticized (...)
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  43. Andreas Dorschel (2001). The Paradox of Opera. The Cambridge Quarterly 30 (4):283-306.
    Opera is a paradoxical genre. For it seems self-defeating to create an illusion of reality by means of the theatrical apparatus if the art form’s central mode of expression, lavish singing in all kinds of circumstances, defies realism anyway. A solution to the paradox is implied by the 18th century turn of European philosophy of art from mimēsis to aisthēsis. In terms of aesthetics, reality is no longer an object of imitation but rather the impact upon and presence for (...)
     
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  44.  1
    Roberto Marchesini (2016). Zoomimesis. Angelaki 21 (1):175-197.
    The meticulous observation and imitation of animals lies deeply within human culture and identity. Zoomimesis refers to this performative animal mimicry and to how animal references and interaction are woven into the conception of the human. Zoomimesis has an anthropodecentering effect that places animal–human interactions in horizontal rather than hierarchical relation. Music, dance, and clothing show influence from animal behaviors. Many types of body art and body modification are inspired by animals. Animal movements and behaviors become an extension of (...)
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  45.  22
    J. M. Bernstein (ed.) (2003). Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume brings together major works by German thinkers, writing just prior to and after Kant, who were enormously influential in this crucial period of aesthetics. These texts include the first translation into English of Schiller's Kallias Letters and Moritz's On the Artistic Imitation of the Beautiful, together with new translations of some of Hölderlin's most important theoretical writings and works by Hamann, Lessing, Novalis and Schlegel. In a philosophical introduction J. M. Bernstein traces the development of aesthetics from (...)
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  46.  4
    Barbara Schmelzer-Ziringer (2015). Der Grand Couturier kokettiert als Künstler: Zu Georg Simmels Modekritik im Kontext seiner Kunstphilosophie. Zeitschrift für Kulturphilosophie 2015 (1-2):207-221.
    Georg Simmel is regarded as a co-founder of fashion theory. In his treatises of vestmental culture of the fin de siècle developed in his main work on the philosophy of money, he emphasizes imitation as a social force of changes in fashion. The then active makers of clothes and couturiers such as Charles Frederick Worth were not given any attention, Simmel instead developed his basic theorems of art referring to the work of painters and sculptors including Rembrandt and Auguste (...)
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  47.  7
    Takashi Kakuni (2010). Le Corps Aux Limites de La Représentation (French). Chiasmi International 12:203-215.
    The Body at the Limits of Representation. The Theory of the Body and Painting in Merleau-PontyIn Eye and Mind,” Merleau-Ponty quotes a phrase from Valéry: “the painter brings his body with him.” He interprets the corporeal experience of the artist, not only as the center of a perceptual orientation or kinesthesis, but also as the inspiration for poets and for painters. In this sense, one can place his theory of body not only within the problematic of the phenomenological constitution of (...)
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  48.  1
    C. B. Tkacz (2003). Singing Women's Words as Sacramental Mimesis. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 70 (2):275-328.
    Singing and praying in the words of biblical men and women is basic to sacramental mimesis, i.e., Christian imitation of the actions of the saints with the intention of thereby opening themselves to grace. This evidence counters the “voiceless victim” paradigm prevalent in much feminist scholarship. In pre-Christian Jewish liturgy, the song of Miriam after the Crossing of the Red Sea was already important in the annual celebration of the Passover. Jesus emphasized the spiritual equality of the sexes in (...)
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  49.  10
    Robert Piercey (2003). Active Mimesis and the Art of History of Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):29-42.
    It is often argued that a study of the history of philosophy is not itself philosophical. Philosophy, it is claimed, is an active, productive enterprise, whereas history is taken to be imitative and therefore passive. My aim in this paper is to argue against this view of the history of philosophy. First, I describe a famous criticism of historians of philosophy—Kant’s critique of the “spirit of imitation.” I claim that the source of this criticism is the received view of (...)
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  50.  1
    Murray Krieger (1984). The Ambiguities of Representation and Illusion: An E. H. Gombrich Retrospective. Critical Inquiry 11 (2):181-194.
    It is difficult to overestimate the impact, beginning in the 1960s, which Gombrich’s discussion of visual representation made on a good number of theorists in an entire generation of thinking about art and—even more—about literary art. For literary theory and criticism were at least as affected by his work as were theory and criticism in the plastic arts. Art and Illusion radically undermined the terms which had controlled discussion of how art represented “reality”—or, rather, how viewers or members of the (...)
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