Search results for 'Immaterial' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John A. Foster (1991). The Immaterial Self: A Defense of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of Mind. Routledge.score: 24.0
    The Immaterial Self examines and defends this thesis, and in particular argues for its Cartesian version, which assigns the non-physical ingredients of the ...
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  2. James Moulder (1972). In Defense of Immaterial Persons. Philosophical Papers 1 (May):38-55.score: 21.0
  3. David Camfield (2007). The Multitude and the Kangaroo: A Critique of Hardt and Negri's Theory of Immaterial Labour. Historical Materialism 15 (2):21-52.score: 21.0
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  4. Massimo de Angelis & David Harvie (2009). 'Cognitive Capitalism' and the Rat-Race: How Capital Measures Immaterial Labour in British Universities. Historical Materialism 17 (3):3-30.score: 21.0
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  5. Daniel von Wachter (2006). Why the Argument From Causal Closure Against the Existence of Immaterial Things is Bad. In H. J. Koskinen, R. Vilkko & S. Philström (eds.), Science - A Challenge to Philosophy? Peter Lang.score: 18.0
    Some argue for materialism claiming that a physical event cannot have a non-physical cause, or by claiming the 'Principle of Causal Closure' to be true. This I call a 'Sweeping Naturalistic Argument'. This article argues against this. It describes what it would be for a material event to have an immaterial cause.
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  6. Marleen Rozemond (2014). Pasnau on the Material–Immaterial Divide in Early Modern Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 171 (1):3-16.score: 18.0
    In Metaphysical Themes: 1274–1671, Robert Pasnau compares the medieval and early modern approaches to the material-immaterial divide and suggests the medievals held the advantage on this issue. I argue for the opposite conclusion. I also argue against his suggestion that we should approach the divide through the notion of a special type of extension for immaterial entities, and propose that instead we should focus on their indivisibility.
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  7. Stephen Priest (1998). Duns Scotus on the Immaterial. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (192):370-372.score: 18.0
    In _De Spiritualitate et Immortalitate Animae Humanae Scotus distinguishes three senses of 'immaterial': x is immaterial if x depends upon nothing material, x is immaterial if x is unextended, x is immaterial if x is abstract. Pace Scotus: depending on nothing material is neither necessary nor sufficient for being immaterial, being unextended is not necessary but is sufficient for being immaterial, and being abstract is not necessary but is sufficient for being immaterial. The (...)
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  8. John Foster (1996). The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Dualism argues that the mind is more than just the brain. It holds that there exists two very different realms, one mental and the other physical. Both are fundamental and one cannot be reduced to the other - there are minds and there is a physical world. This book examines and defends the most famous dualist account of the mind, the cartesian, which attributes the immaterial contents of the mind to an immaterial self. John Foster's new book exposes (...)
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  9. Phillip John Meadows (forthcoming). Holes Cannot Be Counted as Immaterial Objects. Erkenntnis:1-12.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue that the theory that holes are immaterial objects faces an objection that has traditionally been thought to be the principal difficulty with its main rival, which construes holes as material parts of material objects. Consequently, one of the principal advantages of identifying holes with immaterial objects is illusory: its apparent ease of accounting for truths about number of holes. I argue that in spite of this we should not think of holes as material (...)
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  10. Andreas Blank (2013). Fortunio Liceti on Mind, Light, and Immaterial Extension. Perspectives on Science 21 (3):358-378.score: 18.0
    In the history of seventeenth-century philosophy, the distinction between material and immaterial extension is closely associated with the Cambridge Platonist Henry More (1614–1687). The aspect of More’s conception of immaterial extension that proved most influential is his theory of absolute divine space. Very plausibly, the Newtonian conception of space owes a great deal to More’s views on space. More’s views on space in turn were closely linked to his views on the nature of individual spirits—the souls of brutes (...)
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  11. Jason Del Gandio (2011). Rethinking Immaterial Labor. Radical Philosophy Review 14 (2):121-138.score: 18.0
    Working from the post-Workerist tradition, this essay re-specifies the phenomenon of immaterial labor. Immaterial labor is not simply a mode of work relevant to the information-based global economy. Instead, immaterial labor is inherent to the human condition: human beings materialize realities through the immaterial means of communication. This ontological approach to immaterial labor enables us to rethink the radical project: rather than trying to “change the world,” we are now called to create alternative realities that (...)
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  12. Ashley Woodward (2007). Immaterial Matter. In Barbara Bolt, Felicity Colman, Graham Jones & Ashley Woodward (eds.), Sensorium: Aesthetics, Art, Life. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 18.0
    This chapter explores Lyotard’s aesthetics in relation to the artist Yves Klein. Through the different activities of philosophy and art, Lyotard and Klein both explore the nature of sensibilité through an investigation of matter. Both paradoxically conclude that matter is in a sense immaterial. Lyotard understands matter as that part of an artwork which is diverse, unstable, and evanescent: in music, this corresponds to nuance and timbre, and in painting, to colour. Following Kant’s aesthetics, Lyotard interprets matter as that (...)
     
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  13. Edward Feser (2013). Kripke, Ross, and the Immaterial Aspects of Thought. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):1-32.score: 16.0
    James Ross developed a simple and powerful argument for the immateriality of the intellect, an argument rooted in the Aristotelian-Scholastic tradition while drawing on ideas from analytic philosophers Saul Kripke, W. V. Quine, and Nelson Goodman. This paper provides a detailed exposition and defense of the argument, filling out aspects that Ross left sketchy. In particular, it elucidates the argument’s relationship to its Aristotelian-Scholastic and analytic antecedents, and to Kripke’s work especially; and it responds to objections or potential objections to (...)
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  14. David H. Lund (2005). The Conscious Self: The Immaterial Center of Subjective States. Humanity Books.score: 16.0
    Self-consciousness and the self -- Diachronic unity, diachronic singularity, and the subject of consciousness -- A modal argument for immateriality -- Intelligibility concerns and causal objections -- Concluding remarks.
     
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  15. Sheldon M. Cohen (1982). St. Thomas Aquinas on the Immaterial Reception of Sensible Forms. Philosophical Review 91 (2):193-209.score: 15.0
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  16. James Ross (1992). Immaterial Aspects of Thought. Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):136-150.score: 15.0
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  17. Charles W. Mills (1989). Is It Immaterial That There's a 'Material' in 'Historical Materialism'? Inquiry 32 (3):323 – 342.score: 15.0
    G. A. Cohen's influential ?technological determinist? reading of Marx's theory of history rests in part on an interpretation of Marx's use of ?material? whose idiosyncrasy has been insufficiently noticed. Cohen takes historical materialism to be asserting the determination of the social by the material/asocial, viz. ?socio?neutral? facts about human nature and human rationality which manifest themselves in a historical tendency for the forces of production to develop. This paper reviews Marx's writings to demonstrate the extensive textual evidence in favour of (...)
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  18. Alberto Toscano (2007). From Pin Factories to Gold Farmers: Editorial Introduction to a Research Stream on Cognitive Capitalism, Immaterial Labour, and the General Intellect. Historical Materialism 15 (1):3-11.score: 15.0
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  19. Daniel von Wachter (2006). Why the Argument From Causal Closure Against the Existence of Immaterial Things is Bad. In H. J. Koskinen, R. Vilkko & S. PhilströM. (eds.), Science - a Challenge to Philosophy? Peter Lang. 113-124.score: 15.0
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  20. Clare Mac Cumhaill (2013). Perceiving Immaterial Paths. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (3):n/a-n/a.score: 15.0
    In what sense does empty space feature in visual experience? In the first part of this essay I sketch a view advanced by Soteriou and Richardson on which one's visual awareness of empty space is explained by appeal to ‘structural’ features of the phenomenology of visual experience, in particular the phenomenology of experiencing one's visual field as bounded. I suggest that although this ‘structuralist’ view is silent on whether empty space has a phenomenal appearance, the very appeal to structural features (...)
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  21. Kristie Miller (2007). Immaterial Beings. The Monist 90 (3):349-371.score: 15.0
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  22. Wolfgang Fritz Haug & Joseph Fracchia (2009). Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism Immaterial Labour. Historical Materialism 17 (4):177-185.score: 15.0
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  23. Martin M. Tweedale (1992). Origins of the Medieval Theory That Sensation Is an Immaterial Reception of a Form. Philosophical Topics 20 (2):215-231.score: 15.0
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  24. Kevin Corcoran (2003). Material Persons, Immaterial Souls and an Ethic of Life. Faith and Philosophy 20 (2):218-228.score: 15.0
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  25. William G. Lycan (1999). It's Immaterial (a Reply to Sinnott-Armstrong). Philosophical Papers 28 (2):133-136.score: 15.0
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  26. Boris Hennig (2007). Ghazali on Immaterial Substances. In Christian Kanzian & Muhammad Legenhausen (eds.), Substance and Attribute in Islamic Philosophy. Western and Islamic Tradition in Dialogue. Ontos Verlag.score: 15.0
    I will in this paper attempt to extract a positive doctrine on the substantiality of the human soul from Ghazali"s critique of the Aristotelian philosophical tradition. Rather than reflecting on the possibilities and limitations of intercultural dialogue, my aim is to directly engage in such dialogue. Accordingly, I will not suppose that we need to develop and apply external standards according to which one of the two philosophical traditions addressed here, Western and Islamic, may turn out to be superior. Up (...)
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  27. Gary Rosenkrantz (1994). The Immaterial Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):489-491.score: 15.0
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  28. John F. X. Knasas (1990). “Does Natural Philosophy Prove the Immaterial?”. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):265-269.score: 15.0
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  29. Stanley Bates (1994). The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind. Philosophical Books 35 (1):54-56.score: 15.0
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  30. Andreas Blank (2013). Henry More on Spirits, Light, and Immaterial Extension. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):857 - 878.score: 15.0
    According to the Cambridge Platonist Henry More, individual ?spirits? ? the souls of humans and non-human animals ? are extended but cannot be physically divided. His contemporaries and recent commentators have charged that More has never given an explication of the grounds on which the indivisibility of spirits is based. In this article, I suggest that exploring the usage that More makes of the analogy between spirits and light could go some way towards providing such an explication. More compares the (...)
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  31. Marco Boffo (2012). Historical Immaterialism: From Immaterial Labour to Cognitive Capitalism. International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 6 (4):256.score: 15.0
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  32. R. Gill & A. Pratt (2008). In the Social Factory?: Immaterial Labour, Precariousness and Cultural Work. Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):1-30.score: 15.0
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  33. Jonathan Barnes (1983). Immaterial Causes. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 1:169-92.score: 15.0
     
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  34. Laura Beloff (2006). When the Cables Leave, the Interfaces Arrive: Immaterial Networks and Material Interfaces. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 4 (3):211-220.score: 15.0
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  35. Dirk Bunzel (forthcoming). Between Immaterial Labour and Care for the Other. Tracing the Moral Foundations and Limits of Customer Service. Levinas, Business Ethics.score: 15.0
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  36. Nick Dyer-Witheford (2005). Cyber-Negri: General Intellect and Immaterial Labor. In Timothy S. Murphy & Abdul-Karim Mustapha (eds.), The Philosophy of Antonio Negri. Pluto Press. 136--162.score: 15.0
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  37. Julio Alfredo Franco Orozco (2011). The no-place of the multitude: the role of immaterial work in the creation of a new "no-place" in the Imperio. [Spanish]. Eidos 4:60-70.score: 15.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} The current political, economic and social processes that appear as symptoms of the new World order organization attempt to take account by Antoni Negri and Michael Hardt in their book Empire. The power, now is in transnational (...)
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  38. Mark Johnson (1991). Does Natural Philosophy Prove the Immaterial? American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (1):97-105.score: 15.0
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  39. Knutzen (2009). System of Efficient Causes (1735) ; Philosophical Treatise on the Immaterial Nature of the Soul (1744). In Eric Watkins (ed.), Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
  40. Ernest B. Koenker (1980). The Being of the Material and the Immaterial in Heidegger's Thought. Philosophy Today 24 (1):54-61.score: 15.0
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  41. Michael LaBossiere (2011). Who Are You? Perhaps It's Immaterial.. The Philosophers' Magazine 31:36.score: 15.0
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  42. Tomas Machula (2009). Matter and Immaterial Substance According to Bonaventura and Thomas Aquinas. Filosoficky Casopis 57 (2):209-220.score: 15.0
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  43. Aaron Ben-Zeev Making Mental Properties More Natural (1986). Platonic Dualism, LP GERSON This Paper Analyzes the Nature of Platonic Dualism, the View That There Are Immaterial Entities Called" Souls" and That Every Man is Identical with One Such Entity. Two Distinct Arguments for Dualism Are Discovered in the Early and Middle Dialogues, Metaphysical/Epistemological and Eth. The Monist 69 (3).score: 15.0
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  44. Brian Martin (2013). Immaterial Land. In Estelle Barrett & Barbara Bolt (eds.), Carnal Knowledge: Towards a 'New Materialism' Through the Arts. I.B. Tauris.score: 15.0
     
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  45. Franco Orozco & Julio Alfredo (2011). The No-Place of the Multitude: The Role of Immaterial Work in the Creation of a New" No-Place" in the Imperio.[Spanish]. Eidos 4:60-70.score: 15.0
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  46. R. Pfaller (2005). Doing Nothing: On Material Faineance and Immaterial Work. Filozofski Vestnik 26 (2):19-35.score: 15.0
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  47. Judith Revel (2008). The Materiality of the Immaterial: Foucault, Against the Return of Idealisms and New Vitalisms. Radical Philosophy 149:33.score: 15.0
     
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  48. Sean Sayers (2007). The Concept of Labor: Marx and His Critics. Science and Society 71 (4):431 - 454.score: 9.0
    Marx conceives of labor as form-giving activity. This is criticized for presupposing a "productivist" model of labor which regards work that creates a material product — craft or industrial work — as the paradigm for all work (Habermas, Benton, Arendt). Many traditional kinds of work do not seem to fit this picture, and new "immaterial" forms of labor (computer work, service work, etc.) have developed in postindus trial society which, it is argued, necessitate a fundamental revision of Marx's approach (...)
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  49. Hylarie Kochiras (2009). Gravity and Newton's Substance Counting Problem. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 (3):267-280.score: 9.0
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  50. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1965). The Embodied Mind. London,: Allen Unwin.score: 9.0
    Originally published in 1965. For hundreds of years the thinking of philosophers, psychologists, and theologians on the problem of the mind’s relation to the body was dominated by the Cartesian notion that mind and matter are distinct substances. That Descartes also held that there is a union of mind and matter, in a person, has largely been ignored. This may be because, as he admitted in his private correspondence, it is impossible to think of mind and matter both as being (...)
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