Search results for 'Immortality (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Dennis Rohatyn (ed.) (1997). Philosophy History Sophistry. Rodopi.
    Post-modernism believes in nothing, not even unbelief. Hence it is a genial version of nihilism, and the flip side of despair. Like skepticism , it is healthy insofar as it rejects all dogmas; but unhealthy insofar as it substitutes its own, while eating its own essence. This book diagnoses this disease, and offers irony as its cure. What failure of nerve did to Hellenism, strength of character must do for the decline of the best. Humor, laughter, and detachment are the (...)
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  2.  20
    Lloyd Strickland (2011). John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):826 - 830.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 826-830, July 2011.
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  3.  51
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  4.  7
    Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical theory -- Creating geographical and political (...)
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  5. Mary Warnock (1994). Imagination and Time. Blackwell.
    All religion and much philosophy has been concerned with the contrast between the ephemeral and the eternal. Human beings have always sought ways to overcome time, and to prove that death is not the end. This book consists then in an exploration of certain closely related ideas: personal identity, time, history and our commitment to the future, and the role of imagination in life.
     
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  6. Leila Leah Bronner (2011). Journey to Heaven: Exploring Jewish Views of the Afterlife. Lambda Publishers.
    The Hebrew Bible: glimpses of immortality -- Early post-biblical literature: gateways to heaven and hell -- The mishnah: who will merit the world to come? -- The Talmud: what happens in the next world? -- Medieval Jewish philosophy: faith and reason -- Mysticism: reincarnation in Kabbalah -- Modernity: what do we believe? -- The Messiah: the eternal thread of hope.
     
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  7.  1
    Salvatore Ricciardo (2015). Robert Boyle on God's “Experiments”: Resurrection, Immortality and Mechanical Philosophy. Intellectual History Review 25 (1):97-113.
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  8. Ronna Burger (1984/1999). The Phaedo: A Platonic Labyrinth. St. Augustine's Press.
  9.  29
    Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  10. I. V. Vishev (2005). Problema Zhizni, Smerti I Bessmertii͡a Cheloveka: V Istorii Russkoĭ Filosofskoĭ Mysli. Akademicheskiĭ Proekt.
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  11. Ellis Sandoz & Eric Voegelin (eds.) (1990). Published Essays, 1966-1985. University of Missouri.
    _Published Essays, 1966-1985_ includes some of the most trenchant and compelling of Eric Voegelin's work and is an indispensable companion to his Anamnesis and to the fourth and fifth volumes of _Order and History,_ which were prepared for publication during the same period, the last two decades of the author's life. These essays are quintessential Voegelin. Voegelin was an essayist at heart, and the pieces gathered here bear on almost every aspect of his philosophy. They range in subject matter (...)
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  12. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1972). Renaissance Concepts of Man, and Other Essays. New York,Harper & Row.
    Renaissance concepts of man: The Arensberg lectures: The dignity of man. The immortality of the soul. The unity of truth.--The Renaissance and Byzantine learning: Italian Humanism and Byzantium.--Byzantine and Western Platonism in the fifteenth century.--Wimmer lecture: Renaissance philosophy and the medieval tradition.--Appendix: History of Philosophy and history of ideas.
     
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  13.  5
    Ernst Cassirer (1948/1967). The Renaissance Philosophy of Man. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
    Francesco Petrarca, translated by H. Nachod: Introduction. A self-portrait. The ascent of Mont Ventoux. On his own ignorance and that of many others. A disapproval of an unreasonable use of the discipline of dialectic. An Averroist visits Petrarca. Petraca's aversion to Arab science. A request to take up the fight against Averroes.--Lorenzo Valla, translated by C.E. Trinkaus, Jr.: Introduction by C.E. Trinkaus, Jr. Dialogue on free will.--Marsilio Ficino, translated by J.L. Burroughs: Introduction, by J.L. Burroughs. Five questions concerning the mind.-- (...)
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  14.  13
    Eugene Fontinell (1986/2000). Self, God, and Immortality: A Jamesian Investigation. Fordham University Press.
    Can we who have been touched by the scientific, intellectual, and experimental revolutions of modern and contemporary times still believe with and degree of coherence and consistency that we as individual persons are immortal. Indeed, is there even good cause to hope that we are? In examining the present relationship of reason to faith, can we find justifying reasons for faith? These are the central questions in Self, God, and Immortality, a compelling exercise in philosophical theology. Drawing upon the (...)
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  15. John P. Anton & George L. Kustas (eds.) (2004). Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy I. State University of New York Press.
    The essays in this volume treat a wide variety of fundamental topics and problems in ancient Greek philosophy. The scope of the section on pre-Socratic thought ranges over the views which these thinkers have on such areas of concern as religion, natural philosophy and science, cosmic periods, the nature of elements, theory of names, the concept of plurality, and the philosophy of mind. The essays dealing with the Platonic dialogues examine with unusual care a great number of central themes and (...)
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  16. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (ed.) (2011). The Philosophy of Viagra: Bioethical Responses to the Viagrification of the Modern World. Rodopi.
    The impotency remedy Viagra is the fastest selling drug in history. It has grown beyond being simply a medical phenomenon, but has achieved the status of cultural icon, appearing on television as a pretext for jokes or even as a murder weapon. Viagra has socio-cultural implications that are not limited to sexuality. The Philosophy of Viagra offers a unique perspective as it examines the phenomenon of Viagra through ideas derived from more than two thousand years of philosophical reasoning. In (...)
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  17.  2
    William Irwin, George A. Dunn & Rebecca Housel (2010). True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's _New York Times_ bestsellers _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_ and the _True Blood_ television series Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, _True Blood_, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in the mythical town (...)
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  18. William Irwin, George A. Dunn & Rebecca Housel (2010). True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's _New York Times_ bestsellers _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_ and the _True Blood_ television series Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, _True Blood_, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in the mythical town (...)
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  19. William Irwin, George A. Dunn & Rebecca Housel (2010). True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's _New York Times_ bestsellers _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_ and the _True Blood_ television series Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, _True Blood_, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in the mythical town (...)
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  20. William Irwin, George A. Dunn & Rebecca Housel (2010). True Blood and Philosophy: We Wanna Think Bad Things with You. Wiley.
    The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's _New York Times_ bestsellers _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_ and the _True Blood_ television series Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, _True Blood_, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_, has a rich collection of themes to explore, from sex and romance to bigotry and violence to death and immortality. The goings-on in the mythical town (...)
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  21. William Irwin (2011). True Blood and Philosophy. Wiley.
    NEW BLOOD EDITION: Contains three new chapters from Season 3. This new edition is available as an E-BOOK ONLY and contains three chapters not found in the print book! The first look at the philosophical issues behind Charlaine Harris's _New York Times_ bestsellers _The Southern Vampire Mysteries_ and the _True Blood_ television series! Teeming with complex, mythical characters in the shape of vampires, telepaths, shapeshifters, and the like, _True Blood_, the popular HBO series adapted from Charlaine Harris's bestselling The Southern (...)
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  22. Henrik Lagerlund & Benjamin Hill (eds.) (2015). Routledge Companion to Sixteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge.
    Sixteenth Century philosophy was a unique synthesis of several philosophical frameworks, a blend of old and new, including but not limited to scholasticism, humanism, Neo-Thomism, Aristotelianism, and Stoicism. It was a century that witnessed culturally and philosophically significant moments whose impact still is felt today—some examples include the emergence of Jesuits, the height of the witchcraze, the Protestant Reformation, the rise of philosophical skepticism, Pietro Pomponazzi’s controversial reexamination of traditional understandings of the soul’s mortality, and the deflation of the metaphysical (...)
     
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  23.  17
    Eric S. Schliesser (2002). Indispensable Hume: From Isaac Newton's Natural Philosophy to Adam Smith's "Science of Man". Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    Chapter one is an introduction. In chapter two, I argue that, due to a lack of knowledge of Newton, Hume is unable to use the "Science of Man" to provide a foundation for the other sciences. Hume's account of causality and the missing shade of blue receive special attention. Hume tries, without paying attention to scientific practice, to constrain what science can be about. ;In chapter three, I reconstruct Adam Smith's epistemology. The major theoretical concept of Smith's moral psychology, the (...)
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  24. Jason K. Swedene (2009). Staying Alive: The Varieties of Immortality. Upa.
    This book explores the desire to live forever, which manifests itself in many forms. The author's self-expressed 'aim has been, simply, to write a readable book that will afford the reader an increased sensitivity to the many ways the desire for immortality has shaped history, philosophy, art, and literature.'.
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  25.  26
    Monte Ransome Johnson (2003). Was Gassendi an Epicurean? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):339 - 360.
    Pierre Gassendi was a major factor in the revival of Epicureanism in early modern philosophy, not only through his contribution to the restoration and criticism of Epicurean texts, but also by his adaptation of Epicurean ideas in his own philosophy, which was itself influential on such important figures of early modern philosophy as Hobbes, Locke, Newton, and Boyle (to name just a few). Despite his vigorous defense of certain Epicurean ideas and ancient atomism, Gassendi goes to great lengths to differentiate (...)
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  26.  27
    Aloysius Martinich (1996). On the Proper Interpretation of Hobbes's Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):273-283.
    On the Proper Interpretation of Hobbes's Philosophy Edwin Curley's article, " 'I Durst Not Write So Boldly' "presents the strongest case for Hobbes's allegedly irreligious views. That is why I devoted an appendix to it in my book, The Two Gods of Leviathan. Judging from his article in this issue, I think that the distance between our views has narrowed considerably. Virtually everything he says in the first half of his artide is the same as or is compatible with what (...)
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  27.  21
    Kristi Sweet (2010). Kant and the Culture of Discipline. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):121-138.
    Kant’s notion of culture is typically treated in the context of his philosophy of history. In this paper, however, I explore the importance of culture for Kant’s doctrine of virtue, and argue that culture affords a new way—contra immortality—to think the possibility of attaining virtue. As I show, Kant identifies culture as a site of the self-effacement of nature in its influence on the will. Because of this, we see that for Kant the task of virtue encounters nature (...)
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  28.  9
    Don Garrett (1996). Spinoza: The Enduring Questions. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):460-461.
    460 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34:3 JULY 1996 Graeme Hunter, editor. Spinoza: The Enduring Questions. Toronto: University of To- ronto Press, 1994. Pp. xi + 182. Cloth, $70.00. This volume of eight essays is dedicated to the memory of the late David Savan, and originated from a conference held in his honor prior to his untimely death. The lead essay is by Savan himself, and most of the other essays acknowledge the influence of his work. The first (...)
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  29.  28
    Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  30.  9
    Andrzej Szczeklik (2005). Catharsis: On the Art of Medicine. University of Chicago Press.
    The ancient Greeks used the term catharsis for the cleansing of both the body by medicine and the soul by art. In this inspiring book, internationally renowned cardiologist Andrzej Szczeklik draws deeply on our humanistic heritage to describe the artistry and the mystery of being a doctor. Moving between examples ancient and contemporary, mythological and scientific, Catharsis explores how medicine and art share common roots and pose common challenges. The process of diagnosis, for instance, belongs to a world of magic (...)
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  31.  6
    Edward Nieznański (2013). The First Formalized Proof of the Indestructibility of a Subsistent Form. Studies in East European Thought 65 (1-2):65-73.
    The article presents a formalization of Thomas Aquinas proof for the indestructibility of the human soul. The author of the formalization—the first of its kind in the history of philosophy—is Father Joseph Maria Bocheński. The presentation involves no more than updating the logical symbolism used and accompanies the logical formulae with ordinary language paraphrases in order to ease the reader’s understanding of the formulae. “The fundamental idea of the Thomist proof is of utmost simplicity: things which are destructible are (...)
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  32.  37
    Michael Davis (2011). The Soul of the Greeks: An Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.
    The understanding of the soul in the West has been profoundly shaped by Christianity, and its influence can be seen in certain assumptions often made about the soul: that, for example, if it does exist, it is separable from the body, free, immortal, and potentially pure. The ancient Greeks, however, conceived of the soul quite differently. In this ambitious new work, Michael Davis analyzes works by Homer, Herodotus, Euripides, Plato, and Aristotle to reveal how the ancient Greeks portrayed and understood (...)
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  33.  28
    James Fieser (ed.) (2001). Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion. Thoemmes Press.
    In the past 250 years, David Hume probably had a greater impact on the field of philosophy of religion than any other single philosopher. He relentlessly attacked the standard proofs for God's existence, traditional notions of God's nature and divine governance, the connection between morality and religion, and the rationality of belief in miracles. He also advanced radical theories of the origin of religious ideas, grounding such notions in human psychology rather than in divine reality. In the last decade of (...)
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  34.  4
    Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.) (2014). Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate.
    Kierkegaard’s Concepts is a comprehensive, multi-volume survey of the key concepts and categories that inform Kierkegaard’s writings. Each article is a substantial, original piece of scholarship, which discusses the etymology and lexical meaning of the relevant Danish term, traces the development of the concept over the course of the authorship, and explains how it functions in the wider context of Kierkegaard’s thought. Concepts have been selected on the basis of their importance for Kierkegaard’s contributions to philosophy, theology, the social sciences, (...)
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  35.  15
    B. Parry (2004). Technologies of Immortality: The Brain on Ice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):391-413.
    One of the first envatted brains, the most cyborgian element of J. D. Bernal’s 1929 futuristic manifesto, The world, the flesh and the the devil, proposed a technological solution to the dreary certainty of mortality. In Bernal’s scenario the brain is maintained in an ‘out of body’ but ‘like-body’ environment—in a bath of cerebral–spinal fluid held at constant body temperature. In reality, acquiring prospective immortality requires access to very different technologies—those that allow human organs and tissues to be preserved (...)
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  36. David Apolloni (1996). Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):5-32.
    Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul DAVID APOLLONI VROM Phaedo 78b to 8od, Socrates attempts to answer Simmias' fear that, even if the soul has existed eternally before birth, it might be dispersed and this would be the end of its existence . His answer is an argument which attempts to show that the soul is incomposite because it is similar to the Forms and dissimilar to physical objects. To date, this argument -- the so-called Aftin- (...)
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  37.  27
    Mario C. Mapote (2013). Christ, the Perfection of Man: A Philosophical-Christological Approach on Christian Anthropology. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).
    The study began with an introduction to Philosophy of Man. This Philosophical-Christological approach started with sense of self-awareness on this seemingly vain technological modern world. In the history of philosophy, there were three objects of study evolving by themselves, world, man and God in orderly fashion and repeating in interval phases. Self-experience shows three objects: first, existential unity (past), second, experiential unity (present) and third, transcendental unity (future). Western Philosophy banked on Aristotle’s notion of man as rational animal that (...)
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  38.  10
    Siobhan Ni Chonaill (2007). 'Why May Not Man One Day Be Immortal?': Population, Perfectibility, and the Immortality Question in Godwin's Political Justice. History of European Ideas 33 (1):25-39.
    Godwin's controversial claim for earthly immortality in the first edition of Political Justice has been largely dismissed by scholars as a flaw in his philosophy or as absurd speculation which Godwin cannily omitted from the later editions of the text. In this paper, I will demonstrate, not only that such claims were not nearly as idiosyncratic or eccentric as they have been presented, but that they constitute an intrinsic part of his overall philosophy regarding perfectibility and human progress. Moreover, (...)
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  39.  29
    Michael W. Hickson (2011). The Moral Certainty of Immortality in Descartes. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):227-247.
    In the Dedicatory Letter of the Meditations, René Descartes claims that he will offer a proof of the soul’s immortality, to be accomplished by reason alone. This proof is also promised by the title page of the first edition of the Meditations, which includes the words “in which the existence of God and the immortality of the soul are demonstrated.” But in the Synopsis, and later in his replies to objections, Descartes gives a more nuanced account of the (...)
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  40.  9
    Peter M. Simons (1999). Bolzano, Brentano and Meinong: Three Austrian Realists. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. Cambridge University Press 109-136.
    Although Brentano generally regarded himself as at heart a metaphysician, his work then and subsequently has always been dominated by the Psychology. He is rightly celebrated as the person who reintroduced the Aristotelian-Scholastic notion of intentio back into the study of the mind. Brentano's inspiration was Aristotle's theory of perception in De anima, though his terminology of intentional inexistence was medieval. For the history of the work and its position in his output may I refer to my Introduction to (...)
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  41.  3
    Pekka Kärkkäinen & Henrik Lagerlund (2009). Philosophical Psychology in 1500 : Erfurt, Padua and Bologna. In Sara Heinämaa & Martina Reuter (eds.), Psychology and philosophy : inquiries into the soul from late scholasticism to contemporary thought. Springer
    The chapter gives a general description of philosophical psychology as it was practiced and taught in the sixteenth century at three of the most important universities of the time, the universities of Erfurt, Padua, and Bologna. Contrary to received notions of the Renaissance it argues that the sixteenth-century philosophical psychology was tightly bound to the Aristotelian tradition. At the University of Erfurt, philosophical psychology was developed with strong adherence to the basic doctrines of Buridanian via moderna, as it had been (...)
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  42. Hanne Appelqvist (2012). Apocalypse Now: Wittgenstein's Early Remarks on Immortality and the Problem of Life. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2):195-210.
    In this paper, I develop a Kantian reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein's early notions of immortality and the problem of life. I argue that, in spite of his rejection of the assumption of temporal immortality as a solution to the problem of life, Wittgenstein's understanding of the problem itself reflects the Kantian setting of his early system. Moreover, while there is no room for any postulates of practical reason in Wittgensein's early thought, God and immortality are still notions (...)
     
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  43.  48
    Immanuel Kant (1909/2004). Critique of Practical Reason. Dover Publications.
    The second of Kant’s three critiques, Critique of Practical Reason forms the center of Kantian philosophy. Kant establishes his role as a vindicator of the truth of Christianity in this work, published in 1788, and he approaches his proof by presenting positive affirmations of the immortality of the soul and the existence of God. The philosopher offers an argument concerning the summum bonum of life: people should not simply search after happiness, but follow the moral law and seek to (...)
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  44.  5
    Antonia LoLordo (forthcoming). Locke’s Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  45.  63
    L. Stevenson (2003). Opinion, Belief or Faith, and Knowledge. Kantian Review 7 (1):72-101.
    Kant famously said he 'had to deny knowledge in order to make room for faith ’ . But what exactly was his conception of Glaube, and how does it fit into his epistemology? In the first Critique it is not until the concluding Method section that he explicitly addresses these issues. In the Canon of Pure Reason he lists three questions that sum up ‘all interest of my reason’: What can I know? What should I do? What may I hope? (...)
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  46.  75
    Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  47.  77
    Hubert L. Dreyfus (2012). A History of First Step Fallacies. Minds and Machines 22 (2):87-99.
    In the 1960s, without realizing it, AI researchers were hard at work finding the features, rules, and representations needed for turning rationalist philosophy into a research program, and by so doing AI researchers condemned their enterprise to failure. About the same time, a logician, Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, pointed out that AI optimism was based on what he called the “first step fallacy”. First step thinking has the idea of a successful last step built in. Limited early success, however, is not a (...)
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  48.  4
    Annalisa Cappiello & Marco Lamanna (2015). Il principio dell’unicità del vero dalla bolla Apostolici regiminis alla Rivoluzione scientifica. Quaestio 14:229-256.
    On December 19th 1513, the papal bull Apostolici regiminis sanctioned the dogma of the immortality of the soul, imposing the defence of the Christian doctrine during the courses in philosophy. In their lectures, the Christian teachers had to contrast some unorthodox topics such as the mortality of the individual soul, the unity of the intellect and the eternity of the world. All of their arguments should be based on the principle of the unity of truth, according to which philosophical (...)
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  49.  16
    Virginia E. López Domínguez (1994). Muerte y Nihilismo En El Pensamiento de J.G. Fichte. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 11:139-154.
    This article analyses the accusation of nihilism that F. H. Jacobi made against Fichte in a letter of mars. 1799, imputation that lays on the personal conception ofJacobi about the reason as a negative capacity which only can destroy its objects. The letter in question implicates two different types of nihilism: a)The cosmological one, accepted by Fichte and named acosmism by him. It is only a reformulation of the sensible world from practical principIes, but doesn't suppose an annihilation or scorn (...)
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  50. Richard Bett, Christopher Bobonich, David Bostock, Eric A. Brown, John M. Cooper, Dorothea Frede, David Gallop, Jonathan Lear, Nicholas D. Smith, Thomas M. Robinson, Christopher Shields, C. C. W. Taylor, Cass Weller & Bernard Williams (2001). Essays on Plato's Psychology. Lexington Books.
    The last several decades have witnessed an explosion of research in Platonic philosophy. A central focus of his philosophical effort, Plato's psychology is of interest both in its own right and as fundamental to his metaphysical and moral theories. This anthology offers, for the first time, a collection of the best classic and recent essays on cenral topics of Plato's psychological theory, including essays on the nature of the soul, studies of the tripartite soul for which Plato argues in the (...)
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