Search results for 'Immortality History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. S. R. F. Price, R. Chapman, G. Gnoli, J. -P. Vernant, S. C. Humphreys, H. King, E. Vermeule & J. Whaley (1983). The Archaeology of DeathLa Mort, les Morts Dans les Societes anciennesMortality and Immortality: The Anthropology and Archaeology of DeathAspects of Death in Early Greek Art and PoetryMirrors of Mortality: Studies in the Social History of Death. Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:195.score: 120.0
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  2. Stephen Downes (1990). Immortality Vs. Muller's Ratchet. Sex and Death in Protozoa: The History of an Obsession (1988). By Graham Bell. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Pp. 199. £25.00, $44.50. ISBN 0 521 36141 9. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (4):198-198.score: 120.0
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  3. Eugene Fontinell (1986/2000). Self, God, and Immortality: A Jamesian Investigation. Fordham University Press.score: 96.0
    Can we who have been touched by the scientific, intellectual, and experimental revolutions of modern and contemporary times still believe with and degree of coherence and consistency that we as individual persons are immortal. Indeed, is there even good cause to hope that we are? In examining the present relationship of reason to faith, can we find justifying reasons for faith? These are the central questions in Self, God, and Immortality, a compelling exercise in philosophical theology. Drawing upon the (...)
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  4. Ovey N. Mohammed (1984). Averroesʼ Doctrine of Immortality: A Matter of Controversy. Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion/Corporation Canadienne des Sciences Religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.score: 90.0
    INTRODUCTION The Background Mid-way through the twelfth century, as the Latin West was introduced to a wealth of previously unknown scientific and ...
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  5. John Gray (2011). The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.score: 70.0
  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  7. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.score: 54.0
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  8. Pekka Kärkkäinen & Henrik Lagerlund (2009). Philosophical Psychology in 1500 : Erfurt, Padua and Bologna. In Sara Heinämaa & Martina Reuter (eds.), Psychology and philosophy : inquiries into the soul from late scholasticism to contemporary thought. Springer.score: 54.0
    The chapter gives a general description of philosophical psychology as it was practiced and taught in the sixteenth century at three of the most important universities of the time, the universities of Erfurt, Padua, and Bologna. Contrary to received notions of the Renaissance it argues that the sixteenth-century philosophical psychology was tightly bound to the Aristotelian tradition. At the University of Erfurt, philosophical psychology was developed with strong adherence to the basic doctrines of Buridanian via moderna, as it had been (...)
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  9. Leila Leah Bronner (2011). Journey to Heaven: Exploring Jewish Views of the Afterlife. Lambda Publishers.score: 54.0
    The Hebrew Bible: glimpses of immortality -- Early post-biblical literature: gateways to heaven and hell -- The mishnah: who will merit the world to come? -- The Talmud: what happens in the next world? -- Medieval Jewish philosophy: faith and reason -- Mysticism: reincarnation in Kabbalah -- Modernity: what do we believe? -- The Messiah: the eternal thread of hope.
     
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  10. Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.score: 48.0
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  11. Ronna Burger (1984/1999). The Phaedo: A Platonic Labyrinth. St. Augustine's Press.score: 48.0
     
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  12. I. V. Vishev (2005). Problema Zhizni, Smerti I Bessmertii͡a Cheloveka: V Istorii Russkoĭ Filosofskoĭ Mysli. Akademicheskiĭ Proekt.score: 48.0
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  13. Mary Warnock (1994). Imagination and Time. Blackwell.score: 48.0
  14. Michael W. Hickson (2011). The Moral Certainty of Immortality in Descartes. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):227-247.score: 42.0
    In the Dedicatory Letter of the Meditations, René Descartes claims that he will offer a proof of the soul’s immortality, to be accomplished by reason alone. This proof is also promised by the title page of the first edition of the Meditations, which includes the words “in which the existence of God and the immortality of the soul are demonstrated.” But in the Synopsis, and later in his replies to objections, Descartes gives a more nuanced account of the (...)
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  15. Lloyd Strickland (2011). John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):826 - 830.score: 42.0
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 826-830, July 2011.
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  16. Rod Preece (2007). Thoughts Out of Season on the History of Animal Ethics. Society and Animals 15 (4):365-378.score: 42.0
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  17. Hanne Appelqvist (2012). Apocalypse Now: Wittgenstein's Early Remarks on Immortality and the Problem of Life. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2):195-210.score: 42.0
    In this paper, I develop a Kantian reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein's early notions of immortality and the problem of life. I argue that, in spite of his rejection of the assumption of temporal immortality as a solution to the problem of life, Wittgenstein's understanding of the problem itself reflects the Kantian setting of his early system. Moreover, while there is no room for any postulates of practical reason in Wittgensein's early thought, God and immortality are still notions (...)
     
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  18. Hillay Zmora (2007). A World Without a Saving Grace: Glory and Immortality in Machiavelli. History of Political Thought 28 (3):449-468.score: 38.0
    Glory in Machiavelli is an ultimate value. Despite its conceptual centrality, his notion of glory has received relatively little scholarly attention. This article seeks to go beyond the common interpretation that Machiavelli conceived of glory as a means to harmonize man's inexorable selfish ambition with the public interest. It addresses the theoretically prior question of why Machiavelli expected that the uncertain hopes for glory would prevail over more immediate human appetites and thus serve the construction of a good political order. (...)
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  19. David Apolloni (1996). Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):5-32.score: 36.0
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  20. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2012). A History of First Step Fallacies. Minds and Machines 22 (2):87-99.score: 36.0
    In the 1960s, without realizing it, AI researchers were hard at work finding the features, rules, and representations needed for turning rationalist philosophy into a research program, and by so doing AI researchers condemned their enterprise to failure. About the same time, a logician, Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, pointed out that AI optimism was based on what he called the “first step fallacy”. First step thinking has the idea of a successful last step built in. Limited early success, however, is not a (...)
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  21. Mark L. McPherran (1994). Socrates on the Immortality of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):1-22.score: 36.0
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  22. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.score: 36.0
  23. B. Parry (2004). Technologies of Immortality: The Brain on Ice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):391-413.score: 36.0
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  24. Andrzej Szczeklik (2005). Catharsis: On the Art of Medicine. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    The ancient Greeks used the term catharsis for the cleansing of both the body by medicine and the soul by art. In this inspiring book, internationally renowned cardiologist Andrzej Szczeklik draws deeply on our humanistic heritage to describe the artistry and the mystery of being a doctor. Moving between examples ancient and contemporary, mythological and scientific, Catharsis explores how medicine and art share common roots and pose common challenges. The process of diagnosis, for instance, belongs to a world of magic (...)
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  25. Marc Bobro (1998). Prudence and the Concern to Survive in Leibniz's Doctrine of Immortality. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (3):303 - 322.score: 36.0
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  26. Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.score: 36.0
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical theory -- Creating geographical and political (...)
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  27. George J. Stack (1967). Plato on Immortality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (4).score: 36.0
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  28. Barbara Stock (2000). Spinoza on the Immortality of the Mind. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):381 - 403.score: 36.0
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  29. Edward P. Mahoney (1970). Agostino Nifo's Early Views on Immortality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).score: 36.0
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  30. Blake D. Dutton (2003). Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):130-131.score: 36.0
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  31. Z. Bauman (1993). Mortality, Immortality and Other Life Strategies (Robert Bocock). History of the Human Sciences 6:117-117.score: 36.0
     
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  32. Robert Bocock (1993). Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Mortality, Immortality and Other Life Strategies. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1992. £39.50, Paper £11.95, 215 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 6 (4):117-123.score: 36.0
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  33. Siobhan Ni Chonaill (2007). 'Why May Not Man One Day Be Immortal?': Population, Perfectibility, and the Immortality Question in Godwin's Political Justice. History of European Ideas 33 (1):25-39.score: 36.0
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  34. Sarah Hutton (1990). The Immortality of the Soul (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):453-454.score: 36.0
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  35. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1972). Renaissance Concepts of Man, and Other Essays. New York,Harper & Row.score: 36.0
    Renaissance concepts of man: The Arensberg lectures: The dignity of man. The immortality of the soul. The unity of truth.--The Renaissance and Byzantine learning: Italian Humanism and Byzantium.--Byzantine and Western Platonism in the fifteenth century.--Wimmer lecture: Renaissance philosophy and the medieval tradition.--Appendix: History of Philosophy and history of ideas.
     
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  36. Steven Nadler (2005). Hope, Fear, and the Politics of Immortality. In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
     
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  37. Slobhan Ni Chonaill (2007). 'Why May Not Man One Day Be Immortal'?: Population, Perfectibility, and the Immortality Question in Godwin's' Political Justice'(William Godwin). History of European Ideas 33 (1):25-39.score: 36.0
     
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  38. J. Thomas (2003). Steven Nadler: Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):150-152.score: 36.0
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  39. Arash Abizadeh (2005). Was Fichte an Ethnic Nationalist? On Cultural Nationalism and its Double. History of Political Thought 26 (2):334-359.score: 30.0
    Even though Fichte’s Reden an die deutsche Nation or Addresses to the German Nation is arguably one of the founding texts of nationalist political thought, it has received little scholarly attention from English-speaking political theorists. The French, by contrast, have a long tradition of treating Fichte as a central figure in the history of political thought, and have given considerable attention to the Reden in particular. While the dominant French interpretation, which construes the Reden as a non-ethnic cultural nationalist (...)
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  40. Monte Ransome Johnson (2003). Was Gassendi an Epicurean? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):339 - 360.score: 30.0
    Pierre Gassendi was a major factor in the revival of Epicureanism in early modern philosophy, not only through his contribution to the restoration and criticism of Epicurean texts, but also by his adaptation of Epicurean ideas in his own philosophy, which was itself influential on such important figures of early modern philosophy as Hobbes, Locke, Newton, and Boyle (to name just a few). Despite his vigorous defense of certain Epicurean ideas and ancient atomism, Gassendi goes to great lengths to differentiate (...)
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  41. Kristi Sweet (2010). Kant and the Culture of Discipline. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):121-138.score: 30.0
    Kant’s notion of culture is typically treated in the context of his philosophy of history. In this paper, however, I explore the importance of culture for Kant’s doctrine of virtue, and argue that culture affords a new way—contra immortality—to think the possibility of attaining virtue. As I show, Kant identifies culture as a site of the self-effacement of nature in its influence on the will. Because of this, we see that for Kant the task of virtue encounters nature (...)
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  42. Denis O'Brien (2007). « Immortel » Et « Impérissable » Dans le Phédon de Platon. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (2):109-262.score: 28.0
    To unravel the intricacies of the last argument of the Phaedo for the immortality of the soul, the reader has to peel away successive presuppositions, his own, Plato's and not least the presupposition that Plato very skilfully portrays as being shared by Socrates and his friends.A first presupposition is the reader's own. According to our modern ways of thinking, a soul that is immortal, if there is such a thing, is a soul that lives forever. That presupposition is not (...)
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  43. Derek Allan (2013). Art and Time. Cambridge Scholars.score: 28.0
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art (...)
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  44. Pauline Kleingeld (1999). Kant, History, and the Idea of Moral Development. History of Philosophy Quarterly 16 (1):59-80.score: 27.0
    I examine the consistency of Kant's notion of moral progress as found in his philosophy of history. To many commentators, Kant's very idea of moral development has seemed inconsistent with basic tenets of his critical philosophy. This idea has seemed incompatible with his claims that the moral law is unconditionally and universally valid, that moral agency is noumenal and atemporal, and that all humans are equally free. Against these charges, I argue not only that Kant's notion of moral development (...)
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  45. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 27.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments (...)
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  46. Alix A. Cohen (2008). Kant's Biological Conception of History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):1-28.score: 27.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that Kant's philosophy of biology has crucial implications for our understanding of his philosophy of history, and that overlooking these implications leads to a fundamental misconstruction of his views. More precisely, I will show that Kant's philosophy of history is modelled on his philosophy of biology due to the fact that the development of the human species shares a number of peculiar features with the functioning of organisms, these features entailing (...)
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  47. Joseph Margolis (2011). Toward a Theory of Human History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):245-273.score: 27.0
    I show the sense in which the concept of history as a human science affects our theory of the natural sciences and, therefore, our theory of the unity of the physical and human sciences. The argument proceeds by way of reviewing the effect of the Darwinian contribution regarding teleologism and of post-Darwinian paleonanthropology on the transformation of the primate members of Homo sapiens into societies of historied selves. The strategy provides a novel way of recovering the unity of the (...)
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  48. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 27.0
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  49. Carl Hammer (2008). Explication, Explanation, and History. History and Theory 47 (2):183–199.score: 27.0
    To date, no satisfactory account of the connection between natural-scientific and historical explanation has been given, and philosophers seem to have largely given up on the problem. This paper is an attempt to resolve this old issue and to sort out and clarify some areas of historical explanation by developing and applying a method that will be called “pragmatic explication” involving the construction of definitions that are justified on pragmatic grounds. Explanations in general can be divided into “dynamic” and “static” (...)
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  50. David Carr (2009). Experience, Temporality and History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (4):335-354.score: 27.0
    Philosophers' reflections on history have been dominated for decades by two themes: representation and memory. On both of these accounts, historical inquiry is divided by a certain gap from what it seeks to find or wants to know, and its activity is seen by philosophers as that of bridging this gap. Against this background, the concept of experience, in spite of its apparent rootedness in the present, can be revived as a means of thinking about our connection to the (...)
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