Search results for 'Immortality History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eugene Fontinell (1986/2000). Self, God, and Immortality: A Jamesian Investigation. Fordham University Press.score: 84.0
    Can we who have been touched by the scientific, intellectual, and experimental revolutions of modern and contemporary times still believe with and degree of coherence and consistency that we as individual persons are immortal. Indeed, is there even good cause to hope that we are? In examining the present relationship of reason to faith, can we find justifying reasons for faith? These are the central questions in Self, God, and Immortality, a compelling exercise in philosophical theology. Drawing upon the (...)
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  2. Ovey N. Mohammed (1984). Averroesʼ Doctrine of Immortality: A Matter of Controversy. Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion/Corporation Canadienne des Sciences Religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.score: 78.0
    INTRODUCTION The Background Mid-way through the twelfth century, as the Latin West was introduced to a wealth of previously unknown scientific and ...
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  3. S. R. F. Price, R. Chapman, G. Gnoli, J. -P. Vernant, S. C. Humphreys, H. King, E. Vermeule & J. Whaley (1983). The Archaeology of DeathLa Mort, les Morts Dans les Societes anciennesMortality and Immortality: The Anthropology and Archaeology of DeathAspects of Death in Early Greek Art and PoetryMirrors of Mortality: Studies in the Social History of Death. Journal of Hellenic Studies 103:195.score: 72.0
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  4. Stephen Downes (1990). Immortality Vs. Muller's Ratchet. Sex and Death in Protozoa: The History of an Obsession (1988). By Graham Bell. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Pp. 199. £25.00, $44.50. ISBN 0 521 36141 9. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (4):198-198.score: 72.0
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  5. John Gray (2011). The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.score: 66.0
  6. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and (...)
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  7. Pekka Kärkkäinen & Henrik Lagerlund (2009). Philosophical Psychology in 1500 : Erfurt, Padua and Bologna. In Sara Heinämaa & Martina Reuter (eds.), Psychology and philosophy : inquiries into the soul from late scholasticism to contemporary thought. Springer.score: 54.0
    The chapter gives a general description of philosophical psychology as it was practiced and taught in the sixteenth century at three of the most important universities of the time, the universities of Erfurt, Padua, and Bologna. Contrary to received notions of the Renaissance it argues that the sixteenth-century philosophical psychology was tightly bound to the Aristotelian tradition. At the University of Erfurt, philosophical psychology was developed with strong adherence to the basic doctrines of Buridanian via moderna, as it had been (...)
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  8. Leila Leah Bronner (2011). Journey to Heaven: Exploring Jewish Views of the Afterlife. Lambda Publishers.score: 54.0
    The Hebrew Bible: glimpses of immortality -- Early post-biblical literature: gateways to heaven and hell -- The mishnah: who will merit the world to come? -- The Talmud: what happens in the next world? -- Medieval Jewish philosophy: faith and reason -- Mysticism: reincarnation in Kabbalah -- Modernity: what do we believe? -- The Messiah: the eternal thread of hope.
     
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  9. Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.score: 48.0
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  10. Ronna Burger (1984/1999). The Phaedo: A Platonic Labyrinth. St. Augustine's Press.score: 48.0
     
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  11. I. V. Vishev (2005). Problema Zhizni, Smerti I Bessmertii͡a Cheloveka: V Istorii Russkoĭ Filosofskoĭ Mysli. Akademicheskiĭ Proekt.score: 48.0
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  12. Mary Warnock (1994). Imagination and Time. Blackwell.score: 48.0
  13. Andrzej Szczeklik (2005). Catharsis: On the Art of Medicine. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    The ancient Greeks used the term catharsis for the cleansing of both the body by medicine and the soul by art. In this inspiring book, internationally renowned cardiologist Andrzej Szczeklik draws deeply on our humanistic heritage to describe the artistry and the mystery of being a doctor. Moving between examples ancient and contemporary, mythological and scientific, Catharsis explores how medicine and art share common roots and pose common challenges. The process of diagnosis, for instance, belongs to a world of magic (...)
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  14. Giuseppe Veltri (2009). Renaissance Philosophy in Jewish Garb: Foundations and Challenges in Judaism on the Eve of Modernity. Brill.score: 36.0
    Introduction: in search of a Jewish renaissance -- Jewish philosophy: humanist roots of a contradiction in terms -- The prophetic-poetic dimension of philosophy: the ars poetica and Immanuel of Rome -- Leone Ebreo's concept of Jewish philosophy -- Conceptions of history: Azariah de Rossi -- Scientific thought and the exegetical mind, with an essay on the life and works of Rabbi Judah Loew -- Mathematical and biblical exegesis: Jewish sources of Athanasius Kircher's musical theory -- Creating geographical and political (...)
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  15. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1972). Renaissance Concepts of Man, and Other Essays. New York,Harper & Row.score: 36.0
    Renaissance concepts of man: The Arensberg lectures: The dignity of man. The immortality of the soul. The unity of truth.--The Renaissance and Byzantine learning: Italian Humanism and Byzantium.--Byzantine and Western Platonism in the fifteenth century.--Wimmer lecture: Renaissance philosophy and the medieval tradition.--Appendix: History of Philosophy and history of ideas.
     
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  16. Arash Abizadeh (2005). Was Fichte an Ethnic Nationalist? On Cultural Nationalism and its Double. History of Political Thought 26 (2):334-359.score: 30.0
    Even though Fichte’s Reden an die deutsche Nation or Addresses to the German Nation is arguably one of the founding texts of nationalist political thought, it has received little scholarly attention from English-speaking political theorists. The French, by contrast, have a long tradition of treating Fichte as a central figure in the history of political thought, and have given considerable attention to the Reden in particular. While the dominant French interpretation, which construes the Reden as a non-ethnic cultural nationalist (...)
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  17. Liam P. Dempsey (2011). 'A Compound Wholly Mortal' : Locke and Newton on the Metaphysics of (Personal) Immortality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):241-264.score: 30.0
    In this paper I consider a cluster of positions which depart from the immortalist and dualist anthropologies of Rene Descartes and Henry More. In particular, I argue that John Locke and Isaac Newton are attracted to a monistic mind-body metaphysics, which while resisting neat characterization, occupies a conceptual space distinct from the dualism of the immortalists, on the one hand, and thoroughgoing materialism of Thomas Hobbes, on the other. They propound a sort of property monism: mind and body are distinct, (...)
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  18. Michael W. Hickson (2011). The Moral Certainty of Immortality in Descartes. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):227-247.score: 30.0
    In the Dedicatory Letter of the Meditations, René Descartes claims that he will offer a proof of the soul’s immortality, to be accomplished by reason alone. This proof is also promised by the title page of the first edition of the Meditations, which includes the words “in which the existence of God and the immortality of the soul are demonstrated.” But in the Synopsis, and later in his replies to objections, Descartes gives a more nuanced account of the (...)
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  19. Lloyd Strickland (2011). John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (4):826 - 830.score: 30.0
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 826-830, July 2011.
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  20. Monte Ransome Johnson (2003). Was Gassendi an Epicurean? History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):339 - 360.score: 30.0
    Pierre Gassendi was a major factor in the revival of Epicureanism in early modern philosophy, not only through his contribution to the restoration and criticism of Epicurean texts, but also by his adaptation of Epicurean ideas in his own philosophy, which was itself influential on such important figures of early modern philosophy as Hobbes, Locke, Newton, and Boyle (to name just a few). Despite his vigorous defense of certain Epicurean ideas and ancient atomism, Gassendi goes to great lengths to differentiate (...)
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  21. Kristi Sweet (2010). Kant and the Culture of Discipline. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):121-138.score: 30.0
    Kant’s notion of culture is typically treated in the context of his philosophy of history. In this paper, however, I explore the importance of culture for Kant’s doctrine of virtue, and argue that culture affords a new way—contra immortality—to think the possibility of attaining virtue. As I show, Kant identifies culture as a site of the self-effacement of nature in its influence on the will. Because of this, we see that for Kant the task of virtue encounters nature (...)
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  22. Rod Preece (2007). Thoughts Out of Season on the History of Animal Ethics. Society and Animals 15 (4):365-378.score: 30.0
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  23. Hanne Appelqvist (2012). Apocalypse Now: Wittgenstein's Early Remarks on Immortality and the Problem of Life. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2):195-210.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I develop a Kantian reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein's early notions of immortality and the problem of life. I argue that, in spite of his rejection of the assumption of temporal immortality as a solution to the problem of life, Wittgenstein's understanding of the problem itself reflects the Kantian setting of his early system. Moreover, while there is no room for any postulates of practical reason in Wittgensein's early thought, God and immortality are still notions (...)
     
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  24. Denis O'Brien (2007). « Immortel » Et « Impérissable » Dans le Phédon de Platon. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 1 (2):109-262.score: 28.0
    To unravel the intricacies of the last argument of the Phaedo for the immortality of the soul, the reader has to peel away successive presuppositions, his own, Plato's and not least the presupposition that Plato very skilfully portrays as being shared by Socrates and his friends.A first presupposition is the reader's own. According to our modern ways of thinking, a soul that is immortal, if there is such a thing, is a soul that lives forever. That presupposition is not (...)
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  25. Derek Allan (2013). Art and Time. Cambridge Scholars.score: 28.0
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art (...)
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  26. Hillay Zmora (2007). A World Without a Saving Grace: Glory and Immortality in Machiavelli. History of Political Thought 28 (3):449-468.score: 26.0
    Glory in Machiavelli is an ultimate value. Despite its conceptual centrality, his notion of glory has received relatively little scholarly attention. This article seeks to go beyond the common interpretation that Machiavelli conceived of glory as a means to harmonize man's inexorable selfish ambition with the public interest. It addresses the theoretically prior question of why Machiavelli expected that the uncertain hopes for glory would prevail over more immediate human appetites and thus serve the construction of a good political order. (...)
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  27. David Apolloni (1996). Plato's Affinity Argument for the Immortality of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):5-32.score: 24.0
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  28. Hubert L. Dreyfus (2012). A History of First Step Fallacies. Minds and Machines 22 (2):87-99.score: 24.0
    In the 1960s, without realizing it, AI researchers were hard at work finding the features, rules, and representations needed for turning rationalist philosophy into a research program, and by so doing AI researchers condemned their enterprise to failure. About the same time, a logician, Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, pointed out that AI optimism was based on what he called the “first step fallacy”. First step thinking has the idea of a successful last step built in. Limited early success, however, is not a (...)
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  29. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  30. Immanuel Kant (1909/2004). Critique of Practical Reason. Dover Publications.score: 24.0
    The second of Kant’s three critiques, Critique of Practical Reason forms the center of Kantian philosophy. Kant establishes his role as a vindicator of the truth of Christianity in this work, published in 1788, and he approaches his proof by presenting positive affirmations of the immortality of the soul and the existence of God. The philosopher offers an argument concerning the summum bonum of life: people should not simply search after happiness, but follow the moral law and seek to (...)
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  31. Steven Matthews (2008). Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon. Ashgate Pub..score: 24.0
    Breaking with a Puritan past -- A mother's concern -- Turmoil and diversity in the English Reformation -- The influences and the options available in English -- Reformation theology -- Intellectual trends : patristics and hebrew -- Millennialism and the belief in a providential age -- Bacon's break with the godly -- Bacon's turn toward the ancient faith -- The formative years -- Bacon and Andrewes -- The Meditationes sacrae and Bacon's turn away from calvinism -- Bacon's confession of faith (...)
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  32. Mark L. McPherran (1994). Socrates on the Immortality of the Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):1-22.score: 24.0
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  33. James Fieser (ed.) (2001). Early Responses to Hume's Writings on Religion. Thoemmes Press.score: 24.0
    In the past 250 years, David Hume probably had a greater impact on the field of philosophy of religion than any other single philosopher. He relentlessly attacked the standard proofs for God's existence, traditional notions of God's nature and divine governance, the connection between morality and religion, and the rationality of belief in miracles. He also advanced radical theories of the origin of religious ideas, grounding such notions in human psychology rather than in divine reality. In the last decade of (...)
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  34. Mario C. Mapote (2013). Christ, the Perfection of Man: A Philosophical-Christological Approach on Christian Anthropology. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).score: 24.0
    The study began with an introduction to Philosophy of Man. This Philosophical-Christological approach started with sense of self-awareness on this seemingly vain technological modern world. In the history of philosophy, there were three objects of study evolving by themselves, world, man and God in orderly fashion and repeating in interval phases. Self-experience shows three objects: first, existential unity (past), second, experiential unity (present) and third, transcendental unity (future). Western Philosophy banked on Aristotle’s notion of man as rational animal that (...)
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  35. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.score: 24.0
  36. B. Parry (2004). Technologies of Immortality: The Brain on Ice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 35 (2):391-413.score: 24.0
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  37. Marc Bobro (1998). Prudence and the Concern to Survive in Leibniz's Doctrine of Immortality. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (3):303 - 322.score: 24.0
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  38. George J. Stack (1967). Plato on Immortality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (4).score: 24.0
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  39. Barbara Stock (2000). Spinoza on the Immortality of the Mind. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):381 - 403.score: 24.0
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  40. Edward P. Mahoney (1970). Agostino Nifo's Early Views on Immortality. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).score: 24.0
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  41. Peter M. Simons (1999). Bolzano, Brentano and Meinong: Three Austrian Realists. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), German Philosophy since Kant. Cambridge University Press. 109-136.score: 24.0
    Although Brentano generally regarded himself as at heart a metaphysician, his work then and subsequently has always been dominated by the Psychology. He is rightly celebrated as the person who reintroduced the Aristotelian-Scholastic notion of intentio back into the study of the mind. Brentano's inspiration was Aristotle's theory of perception in De anima, though his terminology of intentional inexistence was medieval. For the history of the work and its position in his output may I refer to my Introduction to (...)
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  42. Dmitry Shlapentokh (2001). Cosmism in European Thought. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:497-546.score: 24.0
    European thought has had contradictory visions of humanity’s place in the cosmos. Some believed that humanity might survive indefinitely. Yet most of the modern thinkers assumed that humanity, in general, was not different from other species and would eventually disappear. In Russia, a different view prevailed. It was assumed that humanity belonged to a sort of “chosen species” and would have a different destiny from the other species. This idea of “humanity as a chosen species” was supported with the idea (...)
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  43. Blake D. Dutton (2003). Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):130-131.score: 24.0
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  44. Nuria Sánchez Madrid (2014). "El Criticón" de Baltasar Gracián como ontología alegórica. Ingenium. Revista Electrónica de Pensamiento Moderno y Metodología En Historia de la Ideas 7:171-192.score: 24.0
    The article provides a reading of Baltasar Gracian El Criticón in the key of an allegorical ontology that has its central focus in an immanent anthropogenesis. On the basis of the classic monograph of H. Jansen on Gracian’s fundamental concepts, we appraise that a theory based on the search for a solid glory, on the honest exercise of virtue and on the meditation motivated by disillusion, draw the boundaries of the ethical discourse held in El Criticón . According to this (...)
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  45. A. Vergote (1990). Van Rationele Psychologie Tot Wijsgerige Antropologie. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52 (4):607 - 636.score: 24.0
    The title indicates a significant shift in the philosophical study of man. Chr. Wolff introduced „rational psychology" as a complement to the newly created „empirical psychology”. This philosophical psychology has been a dubious enterprise from the very beginning, for two reasons : its alliance with empirical psychology moved it towards introspectionism, an approach soon rejected by scientific psychology ; it was dominated by an intellectualist Cartesian philosophy of consciousness. Kant made a decisive criticism of this philosophical psychology. In the twentieth (...)
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  46. Z. Bauman (1993). Mortality, Immortality and Other Life Strategies (Robert Bocock). History of the Human Sciences 6:117-117.score: 24.0
     
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  47. Nikolaĭ Berdi͡aev (2009). The Divine and the Human. Semantron Press.score: 24.0
    An undevout meditation: the crisis of Christianity: critique of Revelation -- The dialectic of the divine and the human in German thought: the significance of Nietzsche: the dialectic of the doctrine of the trinity -- Development and newness -- Fear -- Suffering -- Evil -- War -- Manhood -- Spirituality -- Beauty -- Immortality -- Messianism and history -- Religion of the spirit: a devout meditation -- The end of things and the new aeon -- Principal works of (...)
     
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  48. Robert Bocock (1993). Reviews : Zygmunt Bauman, Mortality, Immortality and Other Life Strategies. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1992. £39.50, Paper £11.95, 215 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 6 (4):117-123.score: 24.0
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  49. Siobhan Ni Chonaill (2007). 'Why May Not Man One Day Be Immortal?': Population, Perfectibility, and the Immortality Question in Godwin's Political Justice. History of European Ideas 33 (1):25-39.score: 24.0
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  50. Boris Groĭs (2012). Introduction to Antiphilosophy. Verso Books.score: 24.0
    Søren Kierkegaard -- Leo Shestov -- Martin Heidegger -- Jacques Derrida -- Walter Benjamin -- Theodor Lessing -- Ernst Jünger's technologies of immortality -- Three ends of history : Hegel, Solvyov, Kojève -- Nietzsche's influence on the non-official culture of the 1930s -- A genealogy of participatory art -- Lessing, Greenberg, McLuhan.
     
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