Search results for 'Immunology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  38
    David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  2.  49
    Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella (2006). The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for 60 years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception of biological identity. We (...)
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  3.  20
    Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella (2006). The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for sixty years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception of biological identity. We (...)
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  4. A. David Napier (2003). The Age of Immunology: Conceiving a Future in an Alienating World. University of Chicago Press.
    In this fascinating and inventive work, A. David Napier argues that the central assumption of immunology—that we survive through the recognition and elimination of non-self—has become a defining concept of the modern age. Tracing this immunological understanding of self and other through an incredibly diverse array of venues, from medical research to legal and military strategies and the electronic revolution, Napier shows how this defensive way of looking at the world not only destroys diversity but also eliminates the possibility (...)
     
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  5.  22
    Thomas Pradeu (2012). The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. Oxford University Press.
    The Limits of the Self, will be essential reading for anyone interested in the definition of biological individuality and the understanding of the immune system.
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  6. Marc Lappé (1997). The Tao of Immunology a Revolutionary New Understanding of Our Body's Defenses. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  7.  11
    Melinda B. Fagan (2007). The Search for the Hematopoietic Stem Cell: Social Interaction and Epistemic Success in Immunology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (1):217-237.
    Epistemology of science is currently polarized. Descriptive accounts of the social aspects of science coexist uneasily with normative accounts of scientific knowledge. This tension leads students of science to privilege one of these important aspects over the other. I use an episode of recent immunology research to develop an integrative account of scientific inquiry that resolves the tension between sociality and epistemic success. The search for the hematopoietic stem cell by members of Irving Weissman’s laboratory at Stanford University Medical (...)
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  8.  16
    Neeraja Sankaran (2010). The Bacteriophage, its Role in Immunology: How Macfarlane Burnet's Phage Research Shaped His Scientific Style. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):367-375.
    The Australian scientist Frank Macfarlane Burnet—winner of the Nobel Prize in 1960 for his contributions to the understanding of immunological tolerance—is perhaps best recognized as one of the formulators of the clonal selection theory of antibody production, widely regarded as the ‘central dogma’ of modern immunology. His work in studies in animal virology, particularly the influenza virus, and rickettsial diseases is also well known. Somewhat less known and publicized is Burnet’s research on bacteriophages, which he conducted in the first (...)
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  9. Moira Howes (2008). Conceptualizing the Maternal-Fetal Relationship in Reproductive Immunology. In Kenton Kroker, Jennifer Keelan & Pauline Mazumdar (eds.), Crafting Immunity: Working Histories of Clinical Immunology. Ashgate
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  10.  10
    Warwick Anderson (2014). Getting Ahead of One’s Self?: The Common Culture of Immunology and Philosophy. Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 105 (3):606-616.
    During the past thirty years, immunological metaphors, motifs, and models have come to shape much social theory and philosophy. Immunology, so it seems, often has served to naturalize claims about self, identity, and sovereignty—perhaps most prominently in Jacques Derrida’s later studies. Yet the immunological science that functions as “nature” in these social and philosophical arguments is derived from interwar and Cold War social theory and philosophy. Theoretical immunologists and social theorists knowingly participated in a common culture. Thus the “naturalistic (...)
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  11.  29
    Neeraja Sankaran (2012). The Pluripotent History of Immunology. A Review. [REVIEW] Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):37-54.
    The historiography of immunology since 1999 is reviewed, in part as a response to claims by historians such as Thomas Söderqvist the field was still immature at the time (Söderqvist & Stillwell 1999). First addressed are the difficulties, past and present, surrounding the disciplinary definition of immunology, which is followed by a commentary on the recent scholarship devoted to the concept of the immune self. The new literature on broad immunological topics is examined and assessed, and specific charges (...)
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  12.  12
    Tudor M. Baetu (2014). Models and the Mosaic of Scientific Knowledge. The Case of Immunology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):49-56.
    A survey of models in immunology is conducted and distinct kinds of models are characterized based on whether models are material or conceptual, the distinctiveness of their epistemic purpose, and the criteria for evaluating the goodness of a model relative to its intended purpose. I argue that the diversity of models in interdisciplinary fields such as immunology reflects the fact that information about the phenomena of interest is gathered from different sources using multiple methods of investigation. To each (...)
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  13.  2
    Alfred I. Tauber (2015). Immunology Seen Through the Dark Glass of Autoimmunity. Metascience 24 (3):385-391.
    Few topics in contemporary science hold the wide interest commanded by immunology, so this graceful and timely account of the development of this science is a welcomed addition to the literature. Succinct, well-written, and informed, Intolerant Bodies narrates the history of immunology through the lens of autoimmune disease. In what the authors call “a biography” , they have focused on four central illnesses: multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the story told (...)
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  14.  5
    Michelle Jamieson (2010). Imagining 'Reactivity': Allergy Within the History of Immunology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):356-366.
    An allergy is commonly understood to be an overreaction of the immune system to harmless substances that are misrecognised as foreign. This concept of allergy as an abnormal, misdirected immune response—a biological fault—stems from the idea that the immune system is an inherently defensive operation designed to protect the individual through an innate capacity to discriminate between the benign and toxic, or self and nonself. However, this definition of allergy represents a radical departure from its original formulation. Literally meaning ‘altered (...)
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  15.  1
    Donald R. Forsdyke (2012). Immunology (1955-1975): The Natural Selection Theory, the Two Signal Hypothesis and Positive Repertoire Selection. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):139 - 161.
    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne's later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: (...)
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  16. Ilana Löwy (2008). Immunology in the Clinics: Reductionism, Holism or Both? In Kenton Kroker, Jennifer Keelan & Pauline Mazumdar (eds.), Crafting Immunity: Working Histories of Clinical Immunology. Ashgate 165--76.
     
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  17. Judith Fadlon (2004). Meridians, Chakras and Psycho-Neuro-Immunology: The Dematerializing Body and the Domestication of Alternative Medicine. Body and Society 10 (4):69-86.
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  18.  11
    Ilana Löwy (1990). The Strength of Loose Concepts-Boundary Concepts, Federative Experimental Strategies and Disciplinary Growth: The Case of Immunology. History of Science 30 (90):371-396.
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  19.  8
    Alfred I. Tauber, Leon Chernyak, Anne-Marie Moulin, Herman Friedman & Emily Martin (1999). Metchnikoff and the Origins of Immunology: From Metaphor to Theory. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):205-215.
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  20.  62
    Warwick Anderson, Myles Jackson & Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz (1994). Toward an Unnatural History of Immunology. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):575 - 594.
  21. A. I. Tauber (forthcoming). Review: The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  22.  12
    Alfred I. Tauber (2008). Expanding Immunology: Defensive Versus Ecological Perspectives. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (2):270-284.
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  23.  80
    M. A. O'Malley (2014). Thomas Pradeu the Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (1):179-183.
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  24.  55
    Craig R. Stillwell (1994). Thymectomy as an Experimental System in Immunology. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):379 - 401.
  25.  9
    Thomas Söderqvist & Craig Stillwell (1999). Review: The Historiography of Immunology Is Still in Its Infancy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):205 - 215.
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  26. Neeraja Sankaran (2013). Breaking with the Self: Can Continuity in Immunology Succeed? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (2):242-246.
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  27.  7
    Alison McConwell (2015). Thomas Pradeu, The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (3):171-173.
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  28.  38
    Henri Atlan (1998). Paradigms in Immunology and Modern, Post-Modern, Post-Post-Modern, _ Philosophy. A Review of Alfred I. Tauber, the Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (1):125-131.
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  29.  6
    Alberto Cambrosio, Peter Keating & Alfred I. Tauber (1994). Introduction: Immunology as a Historical Object. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):375-378.
  30.  47
    Ilana Löwy (1997). Epidemiology, Immunology, and Yellow Fever: The Rockefeller Foundation in Brazil, 1923-1939. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 30 (3):397 - 417.
  31. D. L. Hull, R. E. Langman, S. S. Glenn & M. Blute (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior-Open Peer Commentary-A Single-Process Learning Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):529-530.
     
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  32.  3
    Ilana Löwy (1994). Experimental Systems and Clinical Practices: Tumor Immunology and Cancer Immunotherapy, 1895-1980. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):403 - 435.
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  33.  38
    Moira Howes (2010). Menstrual Function, Menstrual Suppression, and the Immunology of the Human Female Reproductive Tract. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (1):16-30.
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  34. Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini (1986). The Rise of Selective Theories: A Case Study and Some Lessons From Immunology. In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex
     
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  35.  7
    Moira Howes (1998). The Self of Philosophy and the Self of Immunology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (1):118-130.
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  36. Alfred I. Tauber & Mn Norton Wise (2004). Immunology and the Enigma of Selfhood. In M. Norton Wise (ed.), Growing Explanations: Historical Perspectives on Recent Science. Duke University Press
     
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  37.  28
    Alfred I. Tauber (1998). Conceptual Shifts in Immunology: Comments on the 'Two-Way Paradigm'. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (5):457-473.
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  38.  6
    Peter Keating & Alberto Cambrosio (1997). Helpers and Suppressors: On Fictional Characters in Immunology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 30 (3):381 - 396.
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  39.  13
    Witold Wachowski (2012). Immunology of Music”? A Short Introduction to Cognitive Science of Musical Improvisation. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):182-187.
    Studies on music in the area of cognitive sciences – quite varied despite their short history – meet with scepticism. The author of this introduction, presenting some spectacular examples of research on musical improvisation, tries to demonstrate that they enrich rather than reduce our understanding of this phenomenon.
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  40.  7
    Alan S. Perelson (forthcoming). Two Theoretical Problems in Immunology: AIDS and Epitopes. Complexity.
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  41.  23
    Kenneth F. Schaffner (1992). Theory Change in Immunology Part I: Extended Theories and Scientific Progress. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (2).
    This two-part article examines the competition between the clonal selection theory and the instructive theory of the immune response from 1957–1967. In Part I the concept of a temporally extended theory is introduced, which requires attention to the hitherto largely ignored issue of theory individuation. Factors which influence the acceptability of such an extended theory at different temporal points are also embedded in a Bayesian framework, which is shown to provide a rational account of belief change in science. In Part (...)
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  42.  17
    Jurrit Bergsma (1994). Illness, the Mind, and the Body: Cancer and Immunology: An Introduction. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (4).
    From the sixties on it has become clear how the human physical condition could be influenced by human behavior. Although hypothesis were lacking to understand these connections, nursing research especially proved how systematically introduced patient behavior during illness and hospitalization could induce better recovery results and better prognosis for the patient.Information andattitude proved to be crucial elements in these processes of improved patient expectations. It took less than two decades to get to the insights we have in 1994. Recent research (...)
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  43.  3
    Elina Staikou (2014). Putting in the Graft: Philosophy and Immunology. Derrida Today 7 (2):155-179.
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  44.  21
    Kenneth F. Schaffner (1992). Theory Change in Immunology Part II: The Clonal Selection Theory. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (2).
    This two-part article examines the competition between the clonal selection theory and the instructive theory of the immune response from 1957–1967. In Part I the concept of a temporally extended theory is introduced, which requires attention to the hitherto largely ignored issue of theory individuation. Factors which influence the acceptability of such an extended theory at different temporal points are also embedded in a Bayesian framework, which is shown to provide a rational account of belief change in science. In Part (...)
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  45.  5
    Charles Bieberich & George Scangos (1986). Transgenic Mice in the Study of Immunology. Bioessays 4 (6):245-248.
  46.  4
    Richard Novak (2004). Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Biology, Immunology and Therapy (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):305-308.
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  47.  2
    Thomas G. Benedek (2014). "Case Neisser": Experimental Design, the Beginnings of Immunology, and Informed Consent. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (2):249-267.
    As etiologic concepts of diseases gradually changed from humoral to microbial in the 19th century, syphilis presented particularly great challenges to doctors and scientists. Was “syphilis” merely a synonym for “venereal disease,” and did all manifestations attributed to it have the same cause? The discovery in 1879 of the gonococcus by Albert L. Neisser , and of the cause of chancroid, or soft chancre, in 1890 by Augusto Ducrey , established that venereal disease and syphilis were not synonymous, but syphilis (...)
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  48.  3
    B. Cinader (1986). Editorial: Three Goals, Four Revolutions and the Sixth Congress of Immunology. Bioessays 4 (6):243-244.
  49.  1
    Leon T. Rosenberg (1985). The Condition of Immunology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):408-408.
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  50.  6
    Harmke Kamminga (1994). Metchnikoff and the Origins of Immunology: From Metaphor to Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (1):131-145.
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