Search results for 'Imperialism History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. Podoksik (2005). Justice, Power and Athenian Imperialism: An Ideological Moment in Thucydides' History. History of Political Thought 26 (1):21-42.score: 78.0
  2. Shih Chün (1973). On Studying Some History About Imperialism. Chinese Studies in History 6 (3):4-17.score: 78.0
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  3. Teresa A. Meade & Mark Walker (eds.) (1991). Science, Medicine, and Cultural Imperialism. St. Martin's Press.score: 78.0
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  4. Robert Young (2004). White Mythologies: Writing History and the West. Routledge.score: 72.0
    In the first edition of White Mythologies (1990) Robert Young challenged the status of history, asking whether in this postmodern era we should consider it a Western myth, with an uncertain status. Is it, he asked, possible to write history that avoids the trap of Eurocentrism? Investigating the history of History, from Hegel to Foucault, White Mythologies calls into question traditional accounts of a single 'World History' which leaves aside the 'Third World' as surplus to (...)
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  5. P. J. Rhodes (2008). After the Three-Bar Sigma Controversy: The History of Athenian Imperialism Reassessed. Classical Quarterly 58 (02):501-.score: 72.0
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  6. Ian James Kidd (2013). Historical Contingency and the Impact of Scientific Imperialism. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):317–326.score: 72.0
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke and Adrian Walsh propose a normative basis for John Dupré’s criticisms of scientific imperialism, namely, that scientific imperialism can cause a discipline to fail to progress in ways that it otherwise would have. This proposal is based on two presuppositions: one, that scientific disciplines have developmental teleologies, and two, that these teleologies are optimal. I argue that we should reject both of these presuppositions and so conclude that Clarke and (...)
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  7. H. J. Rose (1927). Roman History and Pre-History Histoire Romaine. Tome Premier: Des Origines à l'Achèvement de la Conquête (133 Avant J.-C). Par Ettore Pais. Adapté d'Après le Manuscrit Italien Par Jean Bayet. Pp. 144. Fascicule I. Paris: Les Presses Universitaires de France, 1926. (Part III. Of Histoire Ancienne, Edited by Glotz). Rome the Law-Giver. By J. Declareuil, Translated by E. A. Parker. Pp. Xvi + 400. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., 1927. 16s. Net. Primitive Italy and the Beginnings of Roman Imperialism. By Léon Homo. Translated by V. Gordon Childe. Pp. Xi + 371. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., 1927. 16s. Net. (Two Volumes of History of Civilisation, Edited by Ogden.). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (02):71-72.score: 72.0
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  8. Dana Villa (2011). Review Article: Arendt and Totalitarianism: Contexts of Interpretation Richard H. King and Dan Stone (Eds) Hannah Arendt and the Uses of History: Imperialism, Nation, Race, and Genocide. New York: Berghahn Books, 2007. Peter Baehr Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, and the Social Sciences. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010. [REVIEW] European Journal of Political Theory 10 (2):287-296.score: 72.0
  9. H. J. Edwards (1908). W. T. Arnold on Roman History Studies of Roman Imperialism. By W. T. Arnold, M.A. Edited by Edward Fiddes, M.A., Special Lecturer in Roman History. With Memoir of the Author by Mrs. Humphry Ward and C. E. Montague. Manchester: University Press, 1906. 9″ × 6″. Pp. Cxxiii+281. Portrait. 7s. 6d. Net. The Roman System of Provincial Administration to the Accession of Constantine the Great. By W. T. Arnold, M.A. New Edition Revised From the Author's Notes by E. S. Shuckburgh. Oxford: Blackwell, 1906. 8½″ × 5″. Pp. Xviii + 288. Map. 6s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (02):49-52.score: 72.0
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  10. Steven Johnston (2008). In the Above Article, the Introductory Paragraph Incorrectly Appeared As: Kateb Calls for Serious Thinking. On America's Global Politics:“American Imperialism, Though Continuous in its History, is Moody and Light-Blooded Like That of Athens, but Capable of Shocking Destructiveness”(P. 67). On Comparative Violence: We Should Remember That the United States and Israel. [REVIEW] Political Theory 36 (1):175-176.score: 72.0
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  11. Steve Maher (2011). Richard Immerman, Empire for Liberty: A History of American Imperialism From Benjamin Franklin to Paul Wolfowitz. Radical Philosophy 169:53.score: 72.0
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  12. David Long & Brian C. Schmidt (eds.) (2005). Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations. State University of New York Press.score: 66.0
    This book reconstructs in detail some of the formative episodes of the field's early development and arrives at the conclusion that, in actuality, the early ...
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  13. William Hooker (2009). Carl Schmitt's International Thought: Order and Orientation. Cambridge University Press.score: 62.0
    Introduction -- Schmitt's 'international thought' -- Unravelling sovereignty -- Histories of space -- Acceleration and restraint -- Großraum -- Partisan -- Conclusion.
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  14. Peter N. Miller (1994). Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion, and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The theme of this book is the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain. The revolt of the North American colonies and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. These were expressed in terms of the 'common good', 'necessity', and 'community' - concepts that came to the fore in early modern European political thought and which gave expression to the problem (...)
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  15. Brett Bowden (2009). The Empire of Civilization: The Evolution of an Imperial Idea. University of Chicago Press.score: 54.0
    From the Crusades to the colonial era to the global war on terror, this sweeping volume exposes “civilization” as a stage-managed account of history that ...
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  16. Jim Endersby (2011). A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.score: 54.0
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward or (...)
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  17. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical ethics (...)
     
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  18. Petrus Franciscus Maria Fontaine (1986). The Light and the Dark: A Cultural History of Dualism. J.C. Gieben.score: 54.0
    v. 1. Dualism in the Archaic and Early Classical periods of Greek history -- v. 2. Dualism in the political and social history of Greece in the fifth and fourth century B.C. -- v. 3. Dualism in Greek literature and philosophy in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. -- v. 4. Dualism in the ancient Middle East -- v. 5. A cultural history of Dualism -- v. 6. Dualism in the Hellenistic world -- v. 7. Dualism in (...)
     
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  19. John Culbert (2010). Paralyses: Literature, Travel, and Ethnography in French Modernity. University of Nebraska Press.score: 48.0
    Introduction -- The muse of paralysis -- Horizon of conquest: Eugene Fromentin's Algerian narratives -- Slow progress: Jean Paulhan and Madagascar -- Frustration: Michel Leiris -- Atopia: Roland Barthes -- The wake of Ulysses.
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  20. Joshua Simon (2012). Simon Bolívar's Republican Imperialism: Another Ideology of American Revolution. History of Political Thought 33 (2):280-304.score: 48.0
    This article treats the political thought of Simón Bolívar, a leading figure in South America's struggle for independence. It describes Bolívar's ideas by reference to both their broadly Atlantic origins and their specifically American concerns, arguing that they comprise a theory of `republican imperialism', paradoxically proposing an essentially imperial project as a means of winning and consolidating independence from European rule. This basic tension is traced through Bolívar's discussions of revolution, constitutions, and territorial unification, and then used to frame (...)
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  21. Cornelius Castoriadis (2012). Écrits Politiques: 1945-1997. Sandre.score: 48.0
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  22. Catherine Delmas, Christine Vandamme & Donna Spalding Andréolle (eds.) (2010). Science and Empire in the Nineteenth Century: A Journey of Imperial Conquest and Scientific Progress. Cambridge Scholars.score: 48.0
  23. John Bagot Glubb (1978). The Fate of Empires and Search for Survival. Blackwood.score: 48.0
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  24. S. M. Sergeev, V. V. Rozanov & A. V. Lomonosov (eds.) (2004). Nat͡sii͡a I Imperii͡a V Russkoĭ Mysli Nachala Xx Veka. Izdatelʹskiĭ Dom "Prensa".score: 48.0
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  25. David Harvey (2007). A Brief History of Neoliberalism. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    Neoliberalism - the doctrine that market exchange is an ethic in itself, capable of acting as a guide for all human action - has become dominant in both thought and practice throughout much of the world since 1970 or so. Its spread has depended upon a reconstitution of state powers such that privatization, finance, and market processes are emphasized. State interventions in the economy are minimized, while the obligations of the state to provide for the welfare of its citizens are (...)
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  26. Brett M. Bennett (2011). A Global History of Australian Trees. Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):125 - 145.score: 42.0
    Scholars studying the globalization of Australian trees have previously emphasized the rapid natural propagation of Australian trees outside of their native habitats, believing their success to be a reversal of "ecological imperialism" from the "new world" to the "old world." This article argues that the expansion of Australian trees should not be viewed as a biological phenomenon, but as the result of a long-term attempt by powerful states and state-sponsored scientists to select and breed Australian species that could grow (...)
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  27. Elliot Gaines (2012). British Imperialism in Fiji: A Model for the Semiotics of Cultural Identity. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (2):167-175.score: 42.0
    The history and effects of British imperialism in Fiji created a model for analyzing the semiotics of cultural identity. Following the acquisition of land in Fiji, the British recruited impoverished people from India and relocated them as indentured servants to do work on sugar cane plantations that natives refused to do. When Fiji became independent nearly 100 years later, the island nation had nearly equal populations of native Fijians and people of Indian decent. Fiji experienced three military coupes (...)
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  28. Katherine Clarke (2001). Between Geography and History: Hellenistic Constructions of the Roman World. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    The late Hellenistic period witnessed the rise of an imperial power whose dominion extended across almost the whole known world. The Roman empire radically affected geographical conceptions, evoking new ways of describing the earth and of constructing its history. Katherine Clarke explores the writings of three literary figures of the age - the History of Polybius, two fragmentary works of Posidonius, and the universal Geography of Strabo. Analysis in terms of the philosophical concepts of time and space reveals (...)
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  29. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 36.0
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights in the context of increasing globalisation. Confronts the major objections to human rights, including (...)
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  30. Ryan K. Balot (2006). Greek Political Thought. Blackwell Pub..score: 36.0
    This wide-ranging history of ancient Greek political thought shows what ancient political texts might mean to citizens of the twenty-first century. A provocative and wide-ranging history of ancient Greek political thought. Demonstrates what ancient Greek works of political philosophy might mean to citizens of the twenty-first century. Examines an array of poetic, historical, and philosophical texts in an effort to locate Greek political thought in its cultural context. Pays careful attention to the distinctively ancient connections between politics and (...)
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  31. R. M. Burns (ed.) (2006). Historiography: Critical Concepts in Historical Studies. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Organized thematically, this important five-volume set brings together key essays from the field of historical studies. Including an extensive general introduction by the editor in the first volume, as well as shorter individual introductions in each of the following volumes, this set is essential reading for scholars and students alike. Coverage includes: 1. Foundations - The Classic Tradition - The Old Cultural History - Economic History 2: Society - Social History - Marxism - Annales - History (...)
     
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  32. Matt Matsuda (2010). History and Incompleteness. History and Theory 49 (1):104-114.score: 36.0
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  33. Christian Egander Skov (2013). Radical Conservatism and Danish Imperialism: The Empire Built "Anew From Scratch". Contributions to the History of Concepts 8 (1):67-88.score: 30.0
    The article explores the concept of empire , or rige , in the context of a small nation-state with no immediate claim to imperial greatness and with a rooted self-understanding as anything but an empire. It does this by exploring the concept of empire in the far right movement Young Denmark on the basis of a close reading of their imperialist program in the pamphlet Danmark udslettes! from 1918. Rige had been a vague term for the larger Danish polity that (...)
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  34. Evelleen Richards (1989). The "Moral Anatomy" of Robert Knox: The Interplay Between Biological and Social Thought in Victorian Scientific Naturalism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):373 - 436.score: 30.0
    Historians are now generally agreed that the Darwinian recognition and institutionalization of the polygenist position was more than merely nominal.194 Wallace, Vogt, and Huxley had led the way, and we may add Galton (1869) to the list of those leading Darwinians who incorporated a good deal of polygenist thinking into their interpretions of human history and racial differences.195 Eventually “Mr. Darwin himself,” as Hunt had suggested he might, consolidated the Darwinian endorsement of many features of polygenism. Darwin's Descent of (...)
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  35. Sandra Kemp (1998). The Archive on Which the Sun Never Sets: Rudyard Kipling. History of the Human Sciences 11 (4):33-48.score: 30.0
    In 'No Apocalypse. Not Now' Derrida claims that 'literature produces its referent as a fictive or fabulous referent, which is itself dependent on the possibility of archivising...'. Taking the Kipling archive as its point of reference, this article considers the claims involved in the idea of a literary archive (with its appeals to authority, intention, origin, propri ety). In view of the continuing fascination with the details and events of Kipling's life (the interweaving of his public and private self, and (...)
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  36. K. Adu-Boahen (2011). Pawn of Contesting Imperialists: Nkoransa in the Anglo-Asante Rivalry in Northwestern Ghana, 1874-1900. Journal of Philosophy and Culture 3 (2):55-85.score: 30.0
    Scholarship on the history of imperialism has tended to overly concentrate on Western imperial hegemony over non-Western societies. On the other hand forms of imperialism in societies elsewhere, particularly Africa, remain understudied. The frame of Western imperialism with its operational principles has generally been represented by non Western scholars as economically exploitative, culturally repressive, politically intrusive and disorienting. The rather limited literature on imperial systems in African political history has often been deconstructive of Western (...)’s disruptive propensities in its target societies. However, some referential frameworks employed in interpreting Western imperialism are also applicable to processes of empire building and maintenance in Africa. One of the most relevant of these conceptual frames, perhaps, is J.A. Hobson’s idea that imperialism was invariably fashioned through the ‘combination of economic and political forces’ whose sources are traceable to selfish capitalist interests. Using and modifying the Hobsonian economic model of interpretation, this paper analyses an imperial conflict between the British, a Western imperial power, and Asante, an African imperial overlord, in the interior of Ghana during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. It focuses on the ways in which the rivalry between the two imperial powers manifested as the two powers struggled over the control of Nkoransa, a state in northwestern Ghana, which was strategically situated to sway much of the tide of north-south commerce during the period. The paper argues that the pursuit of commercial domination in the area of modern Ghana was the key issue at the centre of all the imperial contestation between Asante and the British from 1874 to 1900 as represented by the struggle over Nkoransa. (shrink)
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  37. Sanjay Seth (1992). Lenin's Reformulation of Marxism: The Colonial Question as a National Question. History of Political Thought 13 (1):99-128.score: 30.0
    There are two observations about the history of Marxism as a theory, and of the movements informed by that theory, which command wide assent. The first is an indisputable empirical observation: socialist movements proved more successful in the relatively �backward� parts of the world than in the heartlands of capitalism, where Marx expected his ideas to take root and his prophecies to be fulfilled. Marxist ideas and Marxist inspired movements once registered important successes in Eastern and Central Europe (distant (...)
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  38. Duncan Bell (2009). Republican Imperialism: J.A. Froude and the Virtue of Empire. History of Political Thought 30 (1):166-191.score: 30.0
    In this article I pursue two main lines of argument. First, I seek to delineate two distinctive modes of justifying imperialism found in nineteenth-century political thought (and beyond). The 'liberal civilizational'li model, articulated most prominently by John Stuart Mill, justified empire primarily in terms of the benefits that it brought to subject populations. Its proponents sought to 'civilize'lthe 'barbarian'. An alternative `republican' model focused instead on the benefits - glory, honour and power above all - that accrued to the (...)
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  39. Alexander Cook (2012). 'The Great Society of the Human Species': Volney and the Global Politics of Revolutionary France. Intellectual History Review 23 (3):309-328.score: 30.0
    This article analyses the complex and contested geo-politics associated with the concept of a universal human society during the era of the French Revolution. It focuses on the figure of Constantin-François Volney (1757?1820), a neglected philosopher who played a significant role in the history of both French anti-imperialist thought and French imperial practice in North Africa and the Levant. It uses that focus to explore the relationship between visions of human emancipation and the exercise of global power during the (...)
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  40. Richard English (1996). Reflections on Republican Socialism in Ireland: Marxian Roots and Irish Historical Dynamics. History of Political Thought 17 (4):557-571.score: 30.0
    Irish socialist republicanism has cast a larger shadow over political thought in Ireland than one would expect either from the number of its historical adherents or from the cogency of its central arguments. In modern Ulster -- where political theory is constantly chased, and often mauled, by engaged political practitioners -- one can witness this �disproportionate shadow� syndrome in operation. Thus, for example, the bold and boisterous Bernadette Devlin was not only convinced by the arguments of the socialist republican thinker, (...)
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  41. Daniel O'Neill (2009). Rethiking Burke and India. History of Political Thought 30 (3):492-523.score: 30.0
    The question of how to think about the relationship between political theory and empire has recently emerged as an important topic in the history of political thought. In this regard, Edmund Burke, often regarded as the founding father of modern conservatism, has been depicted by a number of contemporary scholars as a staunch anti-imperialist and a strong defender of cultural pluralism and difference. In the present article, I argue against this view in two ways. First, I contend that Burke (...)
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  42. Teo Hwee Leng Phyllis (2010). Chinese and Other Asian Modernisms: A Comparative View of Art-Historical Contexts in the Twentieth Century. Asian Culture and History 2 (2):P3.score: 30.0
    Modernism is often implicitly known and understood from the “Western modernist” perspective and history. The wide recognition of the Western modernist canon as centre and universal displaces the contribution and significance of the non-Western world in the modern movement. Within Asia, the modernisms that arose from various nations in the region had subtly different notions of culture, identity, nationhood, and modernity, although almost every Asian country was related in one way or another to the history of Western (...). Using a comparative analysis, this article examines modernism in twentieth-century Asia from a multicultural viewpoint, and bringing into picture the place of Asia in the history of modernism. (shrink)
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  43. David Haekwon Kim (2004). The Place of American Empire: Amerasian Territories and Late American Modernity. Philosophy and Geography 7 (1):95-121.score: 24.0
    Imperialism rarely receives discussion in mainstream philosophy. In radical philosophy, where imperialism is analyzed with some frequency, European expansion is the paradigm. This essay considers the nature and specificity of American imperialism, especially its racialization structures, diplomatic history, and geographic trajectory, from pre?twentieth century ?Amerasia? to present?day Eurasia. The essay begins with an account of imperialism generally, one which is couched in language consistent with left?liberalism but compatible with a more radical discourse. This account is (...)
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  44. Mathias Risse (2005). Do We Owe the Global Poor Assistance or Rectification? Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):9–18.score: 24.0
    A central theme throughout Thomas Pogge’s path-breaking World Poverty and Human Rights is that the global political and economic order harms people in developing countries, and that our duty toward the global poor is therefore not to assist them, but to rectify injustice. But does the global order harm the poor? I argue elsewhere that there is a sense in which this is indeed so, at least if a certain empirical thesis is accepted.1 However, in this essay, I seek to (...)
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  45. Anne Waters (2003). Introduction: Special Issue on "Native American Women, Feminism, and Indigenism&Quot;. Hypatia 18 (2).score: 24.0
    Anticipate that this volume will nourish discussions in Native American, Indigenous, and Women's Studies, as well as in interdisciplinary courses. In respecting all of our relations, we present this journal in the spirit of healing the earth.The second theme is the incredible violence committed against Native women in the name of a continuing manifest destiny. Internalized oppression, violence turned against oneself, is devastating our communities as elders and youth stand by and watch generations of our people get lost in the (...)
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  46. W. J. Talbott (2005). Which Rights Should Be Universal? Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    "We hold these truths to be self-evident..." So begins the U.S. Declaration of Independence. What follows those words is a ringing endorsement of universal rights, but it is far from self-evident. Why did the authors claim that it was? William Talbott suggests that they were trapped by a presupposition of Enlightenment philosophy: That there was only one way to rationally justify universal truths, by proving them from self-evident premises. With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the authors of (...)
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  47. Ericka Tucker (2012). Developing Normative Consensus: How the ‘International Scene’ Reshapes the Debate Over the Internal and External Criticism of Harmful Social Practices. Journal of East-West Thought 2 (1):107-121.score: 24.0
    Can we ever justly critique the norms and practices of another culture? When activists or policy-makers decide that one culture’s traditional practice is harmful and needs to be eradicated, does it matter whether they are members of that culture? Given the history of imperialism, many argue that any critique of another culture’s practices must be internal. Others argue that we can appeal to a universal standard of human wellbeing to determine whether or not a particular practice is legitimate (...)
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  48. John M. Hobson & Rajiv Malhotra, Rediscovering Indian Civilization: Indian Contributions to the Rise of the Modern West.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a challenge to Eurocentric world history on the grounds that it reifies and exaggerates the role of the West in the creation of modernity, while simultaneously ignoring India's seminal contributions. The groundwork is prepared in the first three sections, which refute the parochial biases of Eurocentrism by revealing India's impressive early developmental record and its place near the center of a nascent global economy. The paper culminates in an approach that places the "dialogue of civilizations" center-stage (...)
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  49. Margot Cleveland, Christopher M. Favo, Thomas J. Frecka & Charles L. Owens (forthcoming). Trends in the International Fight Against Bribery and Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 24.0
    Over the past decade, we have witnessed some early signs of progress in the battle against international bribery and corruption, a problem that throughout the history of commerce had previously been ignored. We present a model that we then use to assess progress in reducing bribery. The model components include both hard law and soft law legislation components and enforcement and compliance components. We begin by summarizing the literature that convincingly argues that bribery is an immoral and unethical practice (...)
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  50. Thomas David Dubois (2005). Hegemony, Imperialism, and the Construction of Religion in East and Southeast Asia. History and Theory 44 (4):113–131.score: 24.0
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