Search results for 'Imperialism Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yudian Wahyudi (2007). Al-Afghānī and Aḥmad Khān on Imperialism: A Comparison From the Perspective of Islamic Legal Philosophy. Pesantren Nawesea Press.score: 132.0
  2. Jonathan Harrison (1956). Pragmatism: Philosophy of Imperialism. By Harry K. Wells. (London: Lawrence & Wishart, Ltd. 1954. Pp. 221. Price 15s.). Philosophy 31 (117):167-.score: 126.0
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  3. Tal Gilead (forthcoming). Economics Imperialism and the Role of Educational Philosophy. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-19.score: 126.0
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  4. Robin Celikates (2011). Public Philosophy in a New Key: Volume I: Democracy and Civic Freedom / Volume II: Imperialism and Civic Freedom by James Tully. Constellations 18 (2):264-266.score: 120.0
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  5. Marco Iorio (2009). Review of James Tully, (Book 1) Public Philosophy in a New Key, Volume I: Democracy and Civic Freedom; (Book 2) Public Philosophy in a New Key, Volume II: Imperialism and Civic Freedom. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).score: 120.0
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  6. Bp Lowe (1981). The Thought of the Philosophy of Life in Political-Ideology of Imperialism. Filosoficky Casopis 29 (3):415-424.score: 120.0
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  7. Harry K. Wells (1971). Pragmatism, Philosophy of Imperialism. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 120.0
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  8. James Tully (2008). Public Philosophy in a New Key. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    v. 1. Democracy and civic freedom -- v. 2. Imperialism and civic freedom.
     
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  9. David Long & Brian C. Schmidt (eds.) (2005). Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations. State University of New York Press.score: 90.0
    This book reconstructs in detail some of the formative episodes of the field's early development and arrives at the conclusion that, in actuality, the early ...
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  10. Bas C. van Fraassen (2006). One Hundred and Fifty Years of Philosophy. Topoi 25 (1-2):123-127.score: 84.0
    Looking back from 2049 over one-hundred and fifty years of philosophy, a student's essay reveals what became of rival strands in Western philosophy – with a sidelong glance at the special Topoi issue on the theme “Philosophy: What is to be Done?” that was published almost half a century earlier.
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  11. Peter N. Miller (1994). Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion, and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    The theme of this book is the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain. The revolt of the North American colonies and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. These were expressed in terms of the 'common good', 'necessity', and 'community' - concepts that came to the fore in early modern European political thought and which gave expression to the problem (...)
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  12. Christopher S. Goto-Jones (2005). Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School and Co-Prosperity. Routledge.score: 66.0
    Nishida Kitaro, originator of the Kyoto School and 'father of Japanese Philosophy' is usually viewed as an essentially apolitical thinker who underwent a 'turn' in the mid-1930s, becoming an ideologue of Japanese imperialism. Political Philosophy in Japan challenges the view that a neat distinction can be drawn between Nishida's apolitical 'pre-turn' writings and the apparently ideological tracts he produced during the war years. In the context of Japanese intellectual traditions, this book suggests that Nishida was a political (...)
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  13. Maughn Gregory (2011). Philosophy for Children and its Critics: A Mendham Dialogue. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):199-219.score: 60.0
    As conceived by founders Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, Philosophy for Children is a humanistic practice with roots in the Hellenistic tradition of philosophy as a way of life given to the search for meaning, in American pragmatism with its emphasis on qualitative experience, collaborative inquiry and democratic society, and in American and Soviet social learning theory. The programme has attracted overlapping and conflicting criticism from religious and social conservatives who don't want children to question traditional values, (...)
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  14. Alan W. Richardson (2002). Engineering Philosophy of Science: American Pragmatism and Logical Empiricism in the 1930s. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2002 (3):S36-S47.score: 60.0
    This essay examines logical empiricism and American pragmatism, arguing that American philosophy's embrace of logical empiricism in the 1930s was not a turning away from Dewey's pragmatism. It places both movements within scientific philosophy and finds two key points on which they agreed: their revolutionary ambitions and their social engineering sensibility. The essay suggests that the disagreement over emotivism in ethics should be placed within the context of a larger issue on which the movements disagreed: demarcationism and (...). (shrink)
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  15. Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Vikki Entwistle (2011). Virtue, Progress and Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):839-846.score: 60.0
  16. Christopher W. Morris (2006). What's Wrong with Imperialism? Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):153-166.score: 60.0
    Imperialism is thought to be wrong by virtually everyone today. The consensus may be correct. However, there may be a few good things to be said for empire. More importantly for political philosophy, empires are not harder to justify or legitimate than states, or so I argue. The bad press that empires receive seems due to a methodological suspect comparison of nasty empires to nice states. When nice empires are considered they do not fare much worse than (nice) (...)
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  17. Noureddine Lamouchi (2005). Jean-Paul Sartre, Philosophe de L'Oppression. Bruylant-Academia.score: 60.0
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  18. Ian James Kidd (2013). Historical Contingency and the Impact of Scientific Imperialism. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):317–326.score: 54.0
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke and Adrian Walsh propose a normative basis for John Dupré’s criticisms of scientific imperialism, namely, that scientific imperialism can cause a discipline to fail to progress in ways that it otherwise would have. This proposal is based on two presuppositions: one, that scientific disciplines have developmental teleologies, and two, that these teleologies are optimal. I argue that we should reject both of these presuppositions and so conclude that Clarke and (...)
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  19. Jeffrey Ayala Milligan, Enoch Stanfill, Anton Widyanto & Huajun Zhang (2011). Philosophers Without Borders? Toward a Comparative Philosophy of Education. Educational Studies 47 (1):50-70.score: 54.0
    One important element of globalization is the dissemination of western educational ideals and organizational frameworks through educational development projects. While postcolonial theory has long offered a useful critique of this expansion, it is less clear about how educational development that eschews neo-imperialist tendencies might proceed. This problem poses a question that requires philosophical reflection. However, much of comparative and international development education ignores philosophical modes of inquiry. Moreover, as Libbrecht (2007) argues, philosophy all too often sees itself as synonymous (...)
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  20. Alexander V. Stehn (2011). Religiously Binding the Imperial Self : Classical Pragmatism's Call and Liberation Philosophy's Response. In Gregory Fernando Pappas (ed.), Pragmatism in the Americas. Fordham University Press.score: 54.0
    My essay begins by providing a broad vision of how William James’s psychology and philosophy were a two-pronged attempt to revive the self whose foundations had collapsed after the Civil War. Next, I explain how this revival was all too successful insofar as James inadvertently resurrected the imperial self, so that he was forced to adjust and develop his philosophy of religion in keeping with his anti-imperialism. James’s mature philosophy of religion therefore articulates a vision of (...)
     
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  21. Robert Young (2004). White Mythologies: Writing History and the West. Routledge.score: 48.0
    In the first edition of White Mythologies (1990) Robert Young challenged the status of history, asking whether in this postmodern era we should consider it a Western myth, with an uncertain status. Is it, he asked, possible to write history that avoids the trap of Eurocentrism? Investigating the history of History, from Hegel to Foucault, White Mythologies calls into question traditional accounts of a single 'World History' which leaves aside the 'Third World' as surplus to the narrative of the West. (...)
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  22. Brett Bowden (2009). The Empire of Civilization: The Evolution of an Imperial Idea. University of Chicago Press.score: 48.0
    From the Crusades to the colonial era to the global war on terror, this sweeping volume exposes “civilization” as a stage-managed account of history that ...
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  23. John Culbert (2010). Paralyses: Literature, Travel, and Ethnography in French Modernity. University of Nebraska Press.score: 48.0
    Introduction -- The muse of paralysis -- Horizon of conquest: Eugene Fromentin's Algerian narratives -- Slow progress: Jean Paulhan and Madagascar -- Frustration: Michel Leiris -- Atopia: Roland Barthes -- The wake of Ulysses.
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  24. William Hooker (2009). Carl Schmitt's International Thought: Order and Orientation. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    Introduction -- Schmitt's 'international thought' -- Unravelling sovereignty -- Histories of space -- Acceleration and restraint -- Großraum -- Partisan -- Conclusion.
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  25. Gregario Fernando Pappas & Jim Garrison (2005). Pragmatism as a Philosophy of Education in the Hispanic World: A Response. Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (6):515-529.score: 48.0
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  26. Nuzhat Amin (2012). Imperialism and the Domestic Front: In Light of To the Lighthouse. Philosophy and Progress 50 (1-2):41-64.score: 48.0
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  27. Cornelius Castoriadis (2012). Écrits Politiques: 1945-1997. Sandre.score: 48.0
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  28. John Bagot Glubb (1978). The Fate of Empires and Search for Survival. Blackwood.score: 48.0
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  29. Grace Ji-Sun Kim (2013). Colonialism, Han, and the Transformative Spirit. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 48.0
    1. Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization -- 2. Consumerism and Overconsumption -- 3. Nature and "Han" -- 4. Transformative Power of the Spirit -- Conclusion.
     
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  30. Matt Matsuda (2010). History and Incompleteness. History and Theory 49 (1):104-114.score: 48.0
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  31. S. M. Sergeev, V. V. Rozanov & A. V. Lomonosov (eds.) (2004). Nat͡sii͡a I Imperii͡a V Russkoĭ Mysli Nachala Xx Veka. Izdatelʹskiĭ Dom "Prensa".score: 48.0
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  32. Uskali Mäki (2009). Economics Imperialism: Concept and Constraints. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):351-380.score: 42.0
    The paper seeks to offer [1] an explication of a concept of economics imperialism, focusing on its epistemic aspects; and [2] criteria for its normative assessment. In regard to [1], the defining notion is that of explanatory unification across disciplinary boundaries. As to [2], three kinds of constraints are proposed. An ontological constraint requires an increased degree of ontological unification in contrast to mere derivational unification. An axiological constraint derives from variation in the perceived relative significance of the facts (...)
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  33. Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh (2009). Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations Between the Sciences. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):195 – 207.score: 42.0
    John Dupr argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupr has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of (...)
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  34. J. Dupre (1994). Against Scientific Imperialism. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:374 - 381.score: 42.0
    Most discussion of the unity of science has concerned what might be called vertical relations between theories: the reducibility of biology to chemistry, or chemistry to physics, and so on. In this paper I shall be concerned rather with horizontal relations, that is to say, with theories of different kinds that deal with objects at the same structural level. Whereas the former, vertical, conception of unity through reduction has come under a good deal of criticism recently (see, e.g., Dupré 1993), (...)
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  35. Uskali Mäki (2002). Symposium on Explanations and Social Ontology 2: Explanatory Ecumenism and Economics Imperialism. Economics and Philosophy 18 (2):235-257.score: 42.0
    In a series of insightful publications, Philip Pettit and Frank Jackson have argued for an explanatory ecumenism that is designed to justify a variety of types of social scientific explanation of different , including structural and rational choice explanations. Their arguments are put in terms of different kinds of explanatory information; the distinction between causal efficacy, causal relevance and explanatory relevance within their program model of explanation; and virtual reality and resilience explanation. The arguments are here assessed from the point (...)
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  36. Huaiyu Wang (2011). What is the Matter with Conscience?: A Confucian Critique of Modern Imperialism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):209-229.score: 42.0
    Through a Confucian critique of modern colonial politics and the failure of Western conscience in a number of historical and literary settings (including the Opium Wars, the Holocaust and the modern slavery), the article criticizes the illusory foundation and inexorable predicaments of modern imperialism. The goal of my investigation is to break open the normative authority of modern Western ideologies so as to initiate a new horizon for the hermeneutics of Confucianism and to suggest an alternative vision of humanity (...)
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  37. J. Kuorikoski & A. Lehtinen (2010). Economics Imperialism and Solution Concepts in Political Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):347-374.score: 42.0
    Political science and economic science . . . make use of the same language, the same mode of abstraction, the same instruments of thought and the same method of reasoning. (Black 1998, 354) Proponents as well as opponents of economics imperialism agree that imperialism is a matter of unification; providing a unified framework for social scientific analysis. Uskali Mäki distinguishes between derivational and ontological unification and argues that the latter should serve as a constraint for the former. We (...)
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  38. Howard Williams (2014). Colonialism in Kant's Political Philosophy. Diametros 39:154-181.score: 42.0
    This article examines the controversy that has arisen concerning the interpretation of Immanuel Kant's account of European colonialism. One the one hand there are those interpreters such as Robert Bernasconi who see Kant's account as all of a piece with his earlier views on race which demonstrate a certain narrow mindedness in relation to black and coloured people and, on the other hand, there are those such as Pauline Kleingeld and Allen Wood who argue that the earlier writings on race (...)
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  39. Wenceslao J. Gonzalez (2012). Methodological Universalism in Science and its Limits Imperialism Versus Complexity. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):155-175.score: 42.0
    Universalism in science, when conceived in methodological terms, leads to the problem of the limits of science. On the one hand, there is “methodological imperialism” which in principle involves a form of universalism. On the other hand, there is the multivariate complexity – structural and dynamic, as well as epistemological and ontological – which represents a huge problem for methodological universalism, as may be seen with the obstacles for scientific prediction. Within the context of the limits of science, there (...)
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  40. Stefano Semplici (forthcoming). Balancing the Principles: Why the Universality of Human Rights is Not the Trojan Horse of Moral Imperialism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-9.score: 42.0
    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the ‘global’ level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the basis for the (...)
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  41. Urszula Chowaniec & Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Conceptualizing Generation and Transformation in Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):5-15.score: 36.0
    The main objective of this collection of papers is to explore ideas of generation and transformation in the context of postdependency discourse as it may be traced in women’s writing published in Bengali, Polish, Czech, Russian and English. As we believe, literature does not have merely a descriptive function or a purely visionary quality but serves also as a discursive medium, which is rhetorically sophisticated, imaginatively influential and stimulates cultural dynamics. It is an essential carrier of collective memory and a (...)
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  42. Sidney Morgenbesser (1973). Imperialism: Some Preliminary Distinctions. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (1):3-44.score: 36.0
  43. Uskali Mäki (2014). Scientific Imperialism: Difficulties in Definition, Identification, and Assessment. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (3):325-339.score: 36.0
  44. W. J. Talbott (2005). Which Rights Should Be Universal? Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    "We hold these truths to be self-evident..." So begins the U.S. Declaration of Independence. What follows those words is a ringing endorsement of universal rights, but it is far from self-evident. Why did the authors claim that it was? William Talbott suggests that they were trapped by a presupposition of Enlightenment philosophy: That there was only one way to rationally justify universal truths, by proving them from self-evident premises. With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the authors (...)
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  45. Sybol Cook Anderson (2009). Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity. Continuum.score: 36.0
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the (...)
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  46. Jennifer Beard (2006). The Political Economy of Desire: International Law, Development and the Nation State. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 36.0
    This book offers an intelligent and thought-provoking analysis of the genealogy of Western capitalist 'development'. Jennifer Beard departs from the common position that development and underdevelopment are conceptual outcomes of the Imperialist Era and positions the genealogy of development within early Christian writings in which the western theological concepts of sin, salvation, and redemption are expounded. In doing so, she links the early Christian writings of theologians such as Augustine and , Anselm and Abelard to the processes of modern identity (...)
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  47. S. L. Hurley (1992). Intelligibility, Imperialism, and Conceptual Scheme. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):89-108.score: 36.0
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  48. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2010). The "Art of Dialogue" and the Christian-Jewish Encounter. A First Approach. Jahrbuch für Religionsphilosophie 9:67-93.score: 36.0
    In this paper I raise awareness of a crucial blind spot in scholarship on the Christian-Jewish dialogue. The main argument of the paper is that a closer examination of the dialogue form is necessary in order to assess the tenability of Christian-Jewish dialogue. Despite the widespread talk and intensive scholarship about the Jewish-Christian dialogue two things remain unclear: (a) what concept of dialogue is presupposed; (b) what makes the dialogue form appropriate for the Christian-Jewish encounter. This paper discusses the possibility (...)
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  49. Uskali Mäki (2012). On the Philosophy of the New Kiosk Economics of Everything. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):219-230.score: 36.0
    The article suggests a list of principles that guide this new genre of popular writing in and on economics: the new kiosk economics of everything. These well-selling books seek to show how the simple ideas of economics are able to reveal hidden mechanisms that unify a surprising variety of everyday phenomena and by doing so entertain their readers and improve the public image of economics. It is also argued that there is a special limited sense in which this qualifies as (...)
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