Search results for 'Implicit Knowledge' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Zoltán Dienes & Josef Perner (1999). A Theory of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):735-808.score: 210.0
    The implicit-explicit distinction is applied to knowledge representations. Knowledge is taken to be an attitude towards a proposition which is true. The proposition itself predicates a property to some entity. A number of ways in which knowledge can be implicit or explicit emerge. If a higher aspect is known explicitly then each lower one must also be known explicitly. This partial hierarchy reduces the number of ways in which knowledge can be explicit. In the (...)
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  2. Alessandro Giordani (2013). On the Factivity of Implicit Intersubjective Knowledge. Synthese (8):1-15.score: 210.0
    The concept of knowledge can be modelled in epistemic modal logic and, if modelled by using a standard modal operator, it is subject to the problem of logical omniscience. The classical solution to this problem is to distinguish between implicit and explicit knowledge and to construe the knowledge operator as capturing the concept of implicit knowledge. In addition, since a proposition is said to be implicitly known just in case it is derivable from the (...)
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  3. Arthur S. Reber (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press.score: 198.0
    In this new volume in the Oxford Psychology Series, the author presents a highly readable account of the cognitive unconscious, focusing in particular on the problem of implicit learning. Implicit learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge that takes place independently of the conscious attempts to learn and largely in the absence of explicit knowledge about what was acquired. One of the core assumptions of this argument is that implicit learning is a fundamental, "root" (...)
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  4. Cheng-Hung Tsai (2003). Dummett's Notion of Implicit Knowledge. Philosophical Writings 24:17-35.score: 180.0
    In this paper I evaluate Michael Dummett’s notion of implicit knowledge by examining his answers to these two questions: (1) Why should we ascribe knowledge of a meaning-theory of a language to a language-user, and why the mode of this knowledge is implicit, but not pure theoretical, pure practical, or unconscious in a Chomskian sense? (2) How could a meaning-theory, which is known implicitly, function as a rule to be followed by the language-user? To answer (...)
     
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  5. Josef Perner & Zoltan Dienes (1999). Deconstructing RTK: How to Explicate a Theory of Implicit Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):790-801.score: 180.0
    In this response, we start from first principles, building up our theory to show more precisely what assumptions we do and do not make about the representational nature of implicit and explicit knowledge (in contrast to the target article, where we started our exposition with a description of a fully fledged representational theory of knowledge (RTK). Along the way, we indicate how our analysis does not rely on linguistic representations but it implies that implicit knowledge (...)
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  6. John R. Vokey & Philip A. Higham (1999). Implicit Knowledge as Automatic, Latent Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):787-788.score: 180.0
    Implicit knowledge is perhaps better understood as latent knowledge so that it is readily apparent that it contrasts with explicit knowledge in terms of the form of the knowledge representation, rather than by definition in terms of consciousness or awareness. We argue that as a practical matter any definition of the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge further involves the notion of control.
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  7. Alexis Shotwell (2014). Implicit Knowledge: How It is Understood and Used in Feminist Theory. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):315-324.score: 180.0
    Feminist theorists have crafted diverse accounts of implicit knowing that exceed the purview of epistemology conventionally understood. I characterize this field as through examining thematic clusters of feminist work on implicit knowledge: phenomenological and foucauldian theories of embodiment; theories of affect and emotion; other forms of implicit knowledge. Within these areas, the umbrella concept of implicit knowledge (or understanding, depending on how it's framed) names either contingently unspoken or fundamentally nonpropositional but epistemically salient (...)
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  8. Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali (1999). Does the Hand Reflect Implicit Knowledge? Yes and No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):766-767.score: 174.0
    Gesture does not have a fixed position in the Dienes & Perner framework. Its status depends on the way knowledge is expressed. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be fully implicit (neither factuality nor predication is explicit) if the goal is simply to move a pointing hand to a target. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be explicit (both factuality and predication are explicit) if the goal is to indicate an object. However, gesture is not restricted to these (...)
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  9. Paul Roberts (1998). Implicit Knowledge and Connectionism: What is the Connection. In K. Kirsner & G. Speelman (eds.), Implicit and Explicit Mental Processes. Lawrence Erlbaum. 119--132.score: 156.0
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  10. David Kirsh (2009). Knowledge, Implicit Vs Explicit. In T. Bayne, A. Cleeremans & P. Wilken (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Cambridge. 397--402.score: 150.0
    In the scientific study of mind a distinction is drawn between explicit knowledgeknowledge that can be elicited from a subject by suitable inquiry or prompting, can be brought to consciousness, and externally expressed in words–and implicit knowledgeknowledge that cannot be elicited, cannot be made directly conscious, and cannot be articulated. Michael Polanyi (1967) argued that we usually ‘know more than we can say’. The part we can articulate is explicitly known; the part we cannot is (...)
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  11. David Kirsh (2009). Knowledge, Explicit Vs Implicit. Oxford Companion to Consciousness:397-402.score: 150.0
    In the scientific study of mind a distinction is drawn between explicit knowledgeknowledge that can be elicited from a subject by suitable inquiry or prompting, can be brought to consciousness, and externally expressed in words—and implicit knowledgeknowledge that cannot be elicited, cannot be made directly conscious, and can- not be articulated. Michael Polanyi (1967) argued that we usually ‘know more than we can say’. The part we can articulate is explicitly known; the part we (...)
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  12. Daniel L. Schacter (1990). Toward a Cognitive Neuropsychology of Awareness: Implicit Knowledge and Anosognosia. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 12:155-78.score: 150.0
  13. Martin Davies (2001). Explicit and Implicit Knowledge: Philosophical Aspects. In N. J. Smelser & P. B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Ltd.score: 150.0
    from the fact that the subject reacts faster to those words than to words that were not on the list. The subject.
     
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  14. Jonathan Sutton (2001). The Contingent a Priori and Implicit Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):251-277.score: 150.0
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  15. Nick Reed, Peter McLeod & Zoltan Dienes (2010). Implicit Knowledge and Motor Skill: What People Who Know How to Catch Don't Know. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):63-76.score: 150.0
  16. Daniel L. Schacter (1992). Implicit Knowledge: New Perspectives on Unconscious Processes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 89:11113-17.score: 150.0
  17. Jonathan Supon (2001). The Contingent a Priori and Implicit Knowledge. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):251–277.score: 150.0
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  18. Zoltán Dienes, Ryan B. Scott & Anil K. Seth (2010). Subjective Measures of Implicit Knowledge That Go Beyond Confidence: Reply to Overgaard Et Al.☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):685-686.score: 150.0
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  19. James A. Hampton (1999). Implicit and Explicit Knowledge: One Representational Medium or Many? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):769-770.score: 150.0
    In Dienes & Perner's analysis, implicitly represented knowledge differs from explicitly represented knowledge only in the attribution of properties to specific events and to self-awareness of the knower. This commentary questions whether implicit knowledge should be thought of as being represented in the same conceptual vocabulary; rather, it may involve a quite different form of representation.
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  20. Ali Saboohi (2012). In Defense of Implicit Knowledge in a Full-Blooded Theory of Meaning. In Piotr Stalmaszcyzk (ed.), Philosophical and Formal Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. Ontos Verlag. 477.score: 150.0
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  21. Michael E. Gorman (1999). Implicit Knowledge in Engineering Judgment and Scientific Reasoning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):767-768.score: 150.0
    Dienes & Perner's theoretical framework should be applicable to two related areas: technological innovation and the psychology of scientific reasoning. For the former, this commentary focuses on the example of nuclear weapon design, and on the decision to launch the space shuttle Challenger. For the latter, this commentary focuses on Klayman and Ha's positive test heuristic and the invention of the telephone.
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  22. Zoltán Dienes, Gerry T. M. Altmann & Shi‐Ji Gao (1999). Mapping Across Domains Without Feedback: A Neural Network Model of Transfer of Implicit Knowledge. Cognitive Science 23 (1):53-82.score: 150.0
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  23. W. Goris (2002). Implicit Knowledge. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 69 (1):33-65.score: 150.0
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  24. Andy D. Mealor & Zoltan Dienes (2013). Explicit Feedback Maintains Implicit Knowledge. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):822-832.score: 150.0
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  25. William J. Rapaport (1988). Review: Ronald Fagin, Moshe Y. Vardi, Knowledge and Implicit Knowledge in a Distributed Environment: Preliminary Report. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (2):667-667.score: 150.0
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  26. Stephen Whitmarsh, Julia Uddén, Henk Barendregt & Karl Magnus Petersson (2013). Mindfulness Reduces Habitual Responding Based on Implicit Knowledge: Evidence From Artificial Grammar Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):833-845.score: 150.0
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  27. N. J. Cooke & S. D. Breedin (1990). Implicit Knowledge About Motion. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):517-517.score: 150.0
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  28. Anold Debate (1991). Recall, Recognition, and Implicit Knowledge. In William Kessen, Andrew Ortony & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), Memories, Thoughts, and Emotions: Essays in Honor of George Mandler. Lawrence Erlbaum. 125.score: 150.0
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  29. Stellan Ohlsson (1999). Theoretical Commitment and Implicit Knowledge: Why Anomalies Do Not Trigger Learning. Science and Education 8 (5):559-574.score: 150.0
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  30. Josef Perner (1996). Simulation as Explicitation of Predication-Implicit Knowledge About the Mind: Arguments for a Simulation-Theory Mix. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 90--104.score: 150.0
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  31. J. Perner (1996). Simulation as Explication of Prediction-Implicit Knowledge: Re-Assessing Its Value for Explaining the Development of Mental State Attributions. In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
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  32. T. Rebeko & E. Nikitina (2000). Implicit Knowledge and Logical Categorisation. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S93 - S93.score: 150.0
     
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  33. Ryan B. Scott & Zoltan Dienes (2010). Fluency Does Not Express Implicit Knowledge of Artificial Grammars. Cognition 114 (3):372-388.score: 150.0
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  34. Ingar Brinck (1999). Nonconceptual Content and the Distinction Between Implicit and Explicit Knowledge. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):760-761.score: 144.0
    The notion of nonconceptual content in Dienes & Perner's theory is examined. A subject may be in a state with nonconceptual content without having the concepts that would be used to describe the state. Nonconceptual content does not seem to be a clear-cut case of either implicit or explicit knowledge. It underlies a kind of practical knowledge, which is not reducible to procedural knowledge, but is accessible to the subject and under voluntary control.
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  35. Andrea Pozzali (2007). Tacit Knowledge, Implicit Learning and Scientific Reasoning. Mind and Society 7 (2):227-237.score: 144.0
    The concept of tacit knowledge is widely used in social sciences to refer to all those knowledge that cannot be codified and have to be transferred by personal contacts. All this literature has been affected by two kind of biases : (1) the interest has been focused more on the result (tacit knowledge) than on the process (implicit learning); (2) tacit knowledge has been somehow reduced to physical skills or know-how; other possible forms of tacit (...)
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  36. Neil W. Mulligan (1999). Applying a Theory of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge to Memory Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):775-776.score: 144.0
    This commentary discusses how Dienes & Perner's theory of implicit and explicit knowledge applies to memory research. As currently formulated, their theory does seem to account simultaneously for population dissociations and dissociations between conceptual and perceptual priming tasks. In addition, the specification of four distinct memorial states (correlated with different recognition test responses) faces important methodological challenges.
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  37. Nicolas Georgieff & Yves Rossetti (1999). How Does Implicit and Explicit Knowledge Fit in the Consciousness of Action? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):765-766.score: 144.0
    Dienes & Perner's (D&P's) target articles proposes an analysis of explicit knowledge based on a progressive transformation of implicit into explicit products, applying this gradient to different aspects of knowledge that can be represented. The goal is to integrate a philosophical concept of knowledge with relevant psychophysical and neuropsychological data. D&P seem to fill an impressive portion of the gap between these two areas. We focus on two examples where a full synthesis of theoretical and empirical (...)
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  38. Robert F. Bornstein (1999). Unconscious Motivation and Phenomenal Knowledge: Toward a Comprehensive Theory of Implicit Mental States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):758-758.score: 144.0
    A comprehensive theory of implicit and explicit knowledge must explain phenomenal knowledge (e.g., knowledge regarding one's affective and motivational states), as well as propositional (i.e., “fact”-based) knowledge. Findings from several research areas (i.e., the subliminal mere exposure effect, artificial grammar learning, implicit and self-attributed dependency needs) are used to illustrate the importance of both phenomenal and propositional knowledge for a unified theory of implicit and explicit mental states.
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  39. Martha Wagner Alibali & Kenneth R. Koedinger (1999). The Developmental Progression From Implicit to Explicit Knowledge: A Computational Approach. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):755-756.score: 144.0
    Dienes & Perner (D&P) argue that nondeclarative knowledge can take multiple forms. We provide empirical support for this from two related lines of research about the development of mathematical reasoning. We then describe how different forms of procedural and declarative knowledge can be effectively modeled in Anderson's ACT-R theory, contrasting this computational approach with D&P's logical approach. The computational approach suggests that the commonly observed developmental progression from more implicit to more explicit knowledge can be viewed (...)
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  40. Tillmann Vierkant (2012). Self Knowledge and Knowing Other Minds: The Implicit / Explicit Distinction as a Tool in Understanding Theory of Mind. British Journal of Developmental Psychology 30 (1):141-155.score: 144.0
    Holding content explicitly requires a form of self knowledge. But what does the relevant self knowledge look like? Using theory of mind as an example, this paper argues that the correct answer to this question will have to take into account the crucial role of language based deliberation, but warns against the standard assumption that explicitness is necessary for ascribing awareness. It argues in line with Bayne that intentional action is at least an equally valid criterion for awareness. (...)
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  41. Ton Baars (2011). Experiential Science; Towards an Integration of Implicit and Reflected Practitioner-Expert Knowledge in the Scientific Development of Organic Farming. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):601-628.score: 138.0
    For further development of organic agriculture, it will become increasingly essential to integrate experienced innovative practitioners in research projects. The characteristics of this process of co-learning have been transformed into a research approach, theoretically conceptualized as “experiential science” (Baars 2007 , Baars and Baars 2007 ). The approach integrates social sciences, natural sciences, and human sciences. It is derived from action research and belongs to the wider field of transdiscliplinary research. In a dialogue-based culture of equality and mutual exchange the (...)
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  42. Vinciane Gaillard, Arnaud Destrebecqz & Axel Cleeremans (2012). The Influence of Articulatory Suppression on the Control of Implicit Sequence Knowledge. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 138.0
    The present study investigated the consciousness-control relationship by suppressing the possibility to exert executive control on incidentally acquired knowledge. Participants performed a serial reaction time (SRT) task, followed by a sequence generation task under inclusion and exclusion instructions and a sequence recognition task. The generation task requires control on the sequential knowledge that has been incidentally acquired. We manipulated the possibility for participants to recruit control processes in the generation task in three different conditions. In addition to a (...)
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  43. Jan de Houwer (2006). Using the Implicit Association Test Does Not Rule Out an Impact of Conscious Propositional Knowledge on Evaluative Conditioning. Learning and Motivation 37 (2):176-187.score: 132.0
  44. Diane Poulin-Dubois & David H. Rakison (1999). A Developmental Theory of Implicit and Explicit Knowledge? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):782-782.score: 126.0
    Early childhood is characterized by many cognitive developmentalists as a period of considerable change with respect to representational format. Dienes & Perner present a potentially viable theory for the stages involved in the increasingly explicit representation of knowledge. However, in our view they fail to map their multi-level system of explicitness onto cognitive developmental changes that occur in the first years of life. Specifically, we question the theory's heuristic value when applied to the development of early mind reading and (...)
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  45. Arthur S. Reber (1989). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge. Journal of Experimental Psychology 118:219-35.score: 120.0
  46. Paul Horwich (1997). Implicit Definition, Analytic Truth, and Aprior Knowledge. Noûs 31 (4):423-440.score: 120.0
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  47. Edward Merrillb & Todd Petersonb (2001). From Implicit Skills to Explicit Knowledge: A Bottom‐Up Model of Skill Learning. Cognitive Science 25 (2):203-244.score: 120.0
  48. John Hawthorne (2000). Implicit Belief and A Priori Knowledge. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (S1):191-210.score: 120.0
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  49. Hilde Haider, Alexandra Eichler & Thorsten Lange (2011). An Old Problem: How Can We Distinguish Between Conscious and Unconscious Knowledge Acquired in an Implicit Learning Task? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):658-672.score: 120.0
  50. Preston Stovall (2007). Hegel's Realism: The Implicit Metaphysics of Self-Knowledge. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):81-117.score: 120.0
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