Search results for 'Importance' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  20
    Sean Valentine & David Hollingworth (2012). Moral Intensity, Issue Importance, and Ethical Reasoning in Operations Situations. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (4):509 - 523.
    Previous work suggests that moral intensity and the perceived importance of an ethical issue can influence individual ethical decision making. However, prior research has not explored how the various dimensions of moral intensity might differentially affect PIE, or how moral intensity might function together with (or in the presence of) PIE to influence ethical decision making. In addition, prior work has also not adequately investigated how the operational context of an organization, which may embody conditions or practices that create (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  2.  41
    Russell Haines, Marc D. Street & Douglas Haines (2008). The Influence of Perceived Importance of an Ethical Issue on Moral Judgment, Moral Obligation, and Moral Intent. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):387 - 399.
    The study extends and tests the issue contingent four-component model of ethical decision-making to include moral obligation. A web-based questionnaire was used to gauge the influence of perceived importance of an ethical issue on moral judgment and moral intent. Perceived importance of an ethical issue was found to be a predictor of moral judgment but not of moral intent as predicted. Moral obligation is suggested to be a process that occurs after a moral judgment is made and explained (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  3.  10
    Timothy Paul Cronan, Lori N. K. Leonard & Jennifer Kreie (2005). An Empirical Validation of Perceived Importance and Behavior Intention in IT Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):231 - 238.
    Robin et al. (1996) suggested a new construct when studying ethical behavioral intention which they entitled PIE (perceived importance). They empirically tested the PIE construct and found it to significantly impact both ethical judgment and behavioral intention. The present study extends and validates Robin et al.s work on PIE using a different context, different scenarios and a different sample. The findings indicate strong support for the validity of Robin et al.s PIE instrument and show PIE to significantly influence ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4.  73
    Raffaele Rodogno (2008). On the Importance of Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):197-212.
    Many among philosophers and non-philosophers would claim that well-being is important in moral theory because it is important to the individual whose well-being it is. The exact meaning of this claim, however, is in need of clarification. Having provided that, I will present a charge against it. This charge can be found in the recent work of both Joseph Raz and Thomas Scanlon. According to the latter the concept of well-being plays an unimportant role in an agent’s deliberation. As I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Harry G. Frankfurt (1988). The Importance of What We Care About: Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a collection of thirteen seminal essays on ethics, free will, and the philosophy of mind. The essays deal with such central topics as freedom of the will, moral responsibility, the concept of a person, the structure of the will, the nature of action, the constitution of the self, and the theory of personal ideals. By focusing on the distinctive nature of human freedom, Professor Frankfurt is ale to explore fundamental problems of what it is to be a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   256 citations  
  6.  26
    Scott J. Vitell & Encarnación Ramos Hidalgo (2006). The Impact of Corporate Ethical Values and Enforcement of Ethical Codes on the Perceived Importance of Ethics in Business: A Comparison of U.S. And Spanish Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):31 - 43.
    This two country study examines the effect of corporate ethical values and enforcement of a code of ethics on perceptions of the role of ethics in the overall success of the firm. Additionally, the impact of organizational commitment and of individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism was examined. The rationale for examining the perceived importance of the role of ethics in this manner is to determine the extent to which the organization itself can influence employee perceptions regarding (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
  7.  38
    Adam Morton (2003). The Importance of Being Understood: Folk Psychology As Ethics. New York: Routledge.
    The Importance of Being Understood argues for an alternative to traditional accounts in contemporary philosophy of the power of folk psychology to explain our...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  8.  35
    William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee (2007). Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265 - 284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  9.  18
    Bernice Bovenkerk & Franck L. B. Meijboom (2012). The Moral Status of Fish. The Importance and Limitations of a Fundamental Discussion for Practical Ethical Questions in Fish Farming. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):843-860.
    As the world population is growing and government directives tell us to consume more fatty acids, the demand for fish is increasing. Due to declines in wild fish populations, we have come to rely more and more on aquaculture. Despite rapid expansion of aquaculture, this sector is still in a relatively early developmental stage. This means that this sector can still be steered in a favorable direction, which requires discussion about sustainability. If we want to avoid similar problems to the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10.  61
    Guillaume Rochefort-Maranda (forthcoming). On the Correct Interpretation of P Values and the Importance of Random Variables. Synthese:1-17.
    The p value is the probability under the null hypothesis of obtaining an experimental result that is at least as extreme as the one that we have actually obtained. That probability plays a crucial role in frequentist statistical inferences. But if we take the word ‘extreme’ to mean ‘improbable’, then we can show that this type of inference can be very problematic. In this paper, I argue that it is a mistake to make such an interpretation. Under minimal assumptions about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  86
    Sami Paavola (2004). Abduction as a Logic and Methodology of Discovery: The Importance of Strategies. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 9 (3):267-283.
    There are various ``classical'' arguments against abduction as a logic of discovery,especially that (1) abduction is too weak a mode of inference to be of any use, and (2) in basic formulation of abduction the hypothesisis already presupposed to be known, so it is not the way hypotheses are discovered in the first place. In this paper I argue, by bringing forth the idea of strategies,that these counter-arguments are weaker than may appear. The concept of strategies suggests, inter alia, that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  12.  53
    Nell Adkins & Robin R. Radtke (2004). Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Importance of Business Ethics and Accounting Ethics Education: Is There an Expectations Gap? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):279-300.
    Despite a wealth of prior research, little consensus has arisen about the goals and effectiveness of business ethics education. Additionally, accounting academics have recently been questioned as to their commitment to accounting ethics education. The current study examines whether accounting students' perceptions of business ethics and the goals of accounting ethics education are fundamentally different from the perceptions of accounting faculty members. The study uses a survey instrument to elicit student and faculty responses to various questions concerning the importance (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  13.  17
    Jens Johansson (2015). The Importance of a Good Ending: Some Reflections on Samuel Scheffler’s Death and the Afterlife. Journal of Ethics 19 (2):185-195.
    In his recent book, Death and the Afterlife, Samuel Scheffler argues that it matters greatly to us that there be other human beings long after our own deaths. In support of this “Afterlife Thesis,” as I call it, he provides a thought experiment—the “doomsday scenario”—in which we learn that, although we ourselves will live a normal life span, 30 days after our death the earth will be completely destroyed. In this paper I question this “doomsday scenario” support for Scheffler’s Afterlife (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  5
    Matt Ferkany & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). The Importance of Participatory Virtues in the Future of Environmental Education. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):419-434.
    Participatory approaches to environmental decision making and assessment continue to grow in academic and policy circles. Improving how we understand the structure of deliberative activities is especially important for addressing problems in natural resources, climate change, and food systems that have wicked dimensions, such as deep value disagreements, high degrees of uncertainty, catastrophic risks, and high costs associated with errors. Yet getting the structure right is not the only important task at hand. Indeed, participatory activities can break down and fail (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  15.  27
    Matt Ferkany & Kyle Powys Whyte (2012). The Importance of Participatory Virtues in the Future of Environmental Education. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):419-434.
    Participatory approaches to environmental decision making and assessment continue to grow in academic and policy circles. Improving how we understand the structure of deliberative activities is especially important for addressing problems in natural resources, climate change, and food systems that have wicked dimensions, such as deep value disagreements, high degrees of uncertainty, catastrophic risks, and high costs associated with errors. Yet getting the structure right is not the only important task at hand. Indeed, participatory activities can break down and fail (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  5
    Derek Sellman (2006). The Importance of Being Trustworthy. Nursing Ethics 13 (2):105-115.
    The idea that nurses should be trustworthy seems to be accepted as generally unproblematic. However, being trustworthy as a nurse is complicated because of the diverse range of expectations from patients, relatives, colleagues, managers, peers, professional bodies and the institutions within which nursing takes place. Nurses are often faced with competing demands and an action perceived by some as trustworthy can be seen by others as untrustworthy. In this article some of the reasons for the importance of being trustworthy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  17.  6
    Anusorn Singhapakdi, Mahesh Gopinath, Janet K. Marta & Larry L. Carter (2008). Antecedents and Consequences of Perceived Importance of Ethics in Marketing Situations: A Study of Thai Businesspeople. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):887 - 904.
    Building on an existing framework concerning ethical intention, this research explores how Thai business people perceive the importance of ethics in various scenarios. This study investigates the relative influences of personal characteristics and the organizational environment underlying the Thai business people’s ethical perception. Corporate ethical values and idealism are shown to positively influence a Thai manager’s perceptions about the importance of ethics. While their ability to perceive the existence of an ethical problem is negatively influenced by relativism, it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  18.  24
    Charles D. Douglas, Ian H. Kerridge & Rachel A. Ankeny (2013). Narratives of 'Terminal Sedation', and the Importance of the Intention-Foresight Distinction in Palliative Care Practice. Bioethics 27 (1):1-11.
    The moral importance of the ‘intention–foresight’ distinction has long been a matter of philosophical controversy, particularly in the context of end-of-life care. Previous empirical research in Australia has suggested that general physicians and surgeons may use analgesic or sedative infusions with ambiguous intentions, their actions sometimes approximating ‘slow euthanasia’. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study of 18 Australian palliative care medical specialists, using in-depth interviews to address the use of sedation at the end of life. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  31
    Deborah C. Poff (2007). Duties Owed in Serving Students: The Importance of Teaching Moral Reasoning and Theories of Ethical Leadership in Educating Business Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):25-31.
    This article concerns the importance of teaching moral reasoning and ethical leadership to all undergraduate students and in particular makes the case that students in business especially need familiarity with these capacities and theories given the complex world in which they will find themselves. The corollary to this analysis is the claim that content on moral reasoning and ethical leadership be mandatory for all business majors and that all degrees require course material on these subjects.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  20.  75
    Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson (2009). The Myth of Language Universals: Language Diversity and its Importance for Cognitive Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):429-448.
    Talk of linguistic universals has given cognitive scientists the impression that languages are all built to a common pattern. In fact, there are vanishingly few universals of language in the direct sense that all languages exhibit them. Instead, diversity can be found at almost every level of linguistic organization. This fundamentally changes the object of enquiry from a cognitive science perspective. This target article summarizes decades of cross-linguistic work by typologists and descriptive linguists, showing just how few and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   59 citations  
  21. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2011). The Importance of History for Philosophy of Psychiatry: The Case of the DSM and Psychiatric Classification. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):446-470.
    Abstract Recently, some philosophers of psychiatry (viz., Rachel Cooper and Dominic Murphy) have analyzed the issue of psychiatric classification. This paper expands upon these analyses and seeks to demonstrate that a consideration of the history of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can provide a rich and informative philosophical perspective for critically examining the issue of psychiatric classification. This case is intended to demonstrate the importance of history for philosophy of psychiatry, and more generally, the potential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  7
    C. Blease (2013). Electroconvulsive Therapy: The Importance of Informed Consent and 'Placebo Literacy'. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):173-174.
    I thank Julie Hersh for her thoughtful and valuable comments on the use of electroconvulsive therapy .1 Discussions with those who have experience of treatments is of the utmost importance when debating issues such as informed consent. I am therefore very pleased to be given this opportunity to respond. Hersh offers three main criticisms of my paper but I hope to show that the tenets of the paper are not undermined by her commentary.Hersh's first criticism stems from her personal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  26
    Kenneth L. Kraft (1991). The Relative Importance of Social Responsibility in Determining Organizational Effectiveness: Student Responses. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):315 - 326.
    This paper investigates the relative importance of social responsibility criteria in determining organizational effectiveness. The organizational effectiveness menu was used as a questionnaire with a sample of 151 senior undergraduates. Each respondent was asked to rate the importance of the criteria from three constituent perspectives within a service organization: (1) as a manager, (2) as an investor, (3) as an employee. Later, a subsample of students (n=61) responded to the same questionnaire acting as a manager in an assigned (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  24.  16
    Darlene Bay & Alexey Nikitkov (2011). Subjective Probability Assessments of the Incidence of Unethical Behavior: The Importance of Scenario–Respondent Fit. Business Ethics 20 (1):1-11.
    Largely due to the difficulty of observing behavior, empirical business ethics research relies heavily on the scenario methodology. While not disputing the usefulness of the technique, this paper highlights the importance of a careful assessment of the fit between the context of the situation described in the scenario and the knowledge and experience of the respondents. Based on a study of online auctions, we provide evidence that even respondents who have direct knowledge of the situation portrayed in the scenario (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  27
    Hai Yap Teoh & Godwin Y. Shiu (1990). Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility and Perceived Importance of Social Responsibility Information Characteristics in a Decision Context. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1):71 - 77.
    This study addressed the questions of perceived importance of social responsibility information (SRI) characteristics in a decision context, as well as the attitudes of institutional investors toward social responsibility involvement. The results showed that SRI presently disclosed in company annual reports did not have any significant impact on institutional investors' decisions. However, if SRI were presented in quantified, financial form, and were focused on product improvement and fair business practices, such information would be perceived as more important for investment (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  26.  24
    John Henry (2004). Metaphysics and the Origins of Modern Science: Descartes and the Importance of Laws of Nature. Early Science and Medicine 9 (2):73-114.
    This paper draws attention to the crucial importance of a new kind of precisely defined law of nature in the Scientific Revolution. All explanations in the mechanical philosophy depend upon the interactions of moving material particles; the laws of nature stipulate precisely how these interact; therefore, such explanations rely on the laws of nature. While this is obvious, the radically innovatory nature of these laws is not fully acknowledged in the historical literature. Indeed, a number of scholars have tried (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  27. Laurence Lampert (2013). The Enduring Importance of Leo Strauss. University of Chicago Press.
    _The Enduring Importance of Leo Strauss_ takes on the crucial task of separating what is truly important in the work of Leo Strauss from the ephemeral politics associated with his school. Laurence Lampert focuses on exotericism: the use of artful rhetoric to simultaneously communicate a socially responsible message to the public at large and a more radical message of philosophic truth to a smaller, more intellectually inclined audience. Largely forgotten after the Enlightenment, exotericism, he shows, deeply informed Strauss both (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  90
    Cora Diamond (1991). The Importance of Being Human. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:35-62.
    I want to argue for the importance of the notion human being in ethics. Part I of the paper presents two different sorts of argument against treating that notion as important in ethics. A. Here is an example of the first sort of argument. What makes us human beings is that we have certain properties, but these properties, making us members of a certain biological species, have no moral relevance. If, on the other hand, we define being human in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  17
    John Tsalikis, Bruce Seaton & Philip Shepherd (2008). Relative Importance Measurement of the Moral Intensity Dimensions. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):613 - 626.
    The relative importance of the Jones’ [Jones, T. M.: 1991, Academy of Management Review 16(2), 366–395] six components of moral intensity was measured using a conjoint experimental design. The most important components influencing ethical perceptions were: probability of effect, magnitude of consequences, and temporal immediacy. Contrary to previous research, overall social consensus was not an important factor. However, consumers exhibit distinctly different patterns in ethical evaluation, and for approximately 15% of respondents social consensus was the most important dimension.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  30.  17
    Ralph A. Mortensen, Jack E. Smith & Gerald F. Cavanagh (1989). The Importance of Ethics to Job Performance: An Empirical Investigation of Managers' Perceptions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 8 (4):253 - 260.
    This study probed a crucial assumption underlying much of the ethics theory and research: do managers perceive ethical behavior to be an important personal job requirement? A large sample of managers from a cross-section of industries and job functions indicated that, compared to other job duties, certain ethical behaviors were moderate to somewhat major parts of their jobs. Some noteworthy differences by industry, organization size, tenure and job function were also found. These findings underscore the importance of ethics for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  31.  39
    Elin Palm (2009). Securing Privacy at Work: The Importance of Contextualized Consent. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):233-241.
    The starting point of this article is that employees’ chances of securing reasonable expectations of privacy at work must be better protected. A dependency asymmetry between employer and job-applicant implies that prospective employees are in a disadvantaged position vis à vis the employer regarding the chances of defending their reasonable interests. Since an increased usage of work related surveillance will, to a larger extent, require of job-applicants that they negotiate their privacy interests in employment contracting, it is important to consider (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32.  10
    Mark A. Hall (2005). The Importance of Trust for Ethics, Law, and Public Policy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):156-167.
    The importance of preserving trust in physicians and in medical institutions has received widespread attention in recent years. Primarily, this is due to the threats to trust posed by managed care, but there is a general and growing recognition that trust deserves more attention than it traditionally has received in all aspects of medical ethics, law, and public policy. Trust has both intrinsic and instrumental value. Trust is intrinsically important because it is a core characteristic that affects the emotional (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  33.  8
    Sean Valentine & Anthony Johnson (2005). Codes of Ethics, Orientation Programs, and the Perceived Importance of Employee Incorruptibility. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):45 - 53.
    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which the review of corporate ethics codes is associated with individuals’ perceptions of the importance of virtue ethics, or more specifically, employee incorruptibility. A convenience sample of individuals working for a university or one of several business organizations located in the Mountain West region of the United States was compiled with a self-report questionnaire. A usable sample of 143 persons representing both the public and private industries was secured (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  34.  12
    Niels van Quaquebeke, Sebastian Zenker & Tilman Eckloff (2009). Find Out How Much It Means to Me! The Importance of Interpersonal Respect in Work Values Compared to Perceived Organizational Practices. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):423-431.
    Two large online surveys were conducted among employees in Germany to explore the importance employees and organizations place on aspects of interpersonal respect in relation to other work values. The first study (n = 589) extracted a general ranking of work values, showing that employees rate issues of respect involving supervisors particularly high. The second study (n = 318) replicated the previous value ranking. Additionally, it is shown that the value priorities indicated by employees do not always match (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  62
    Matthew Noah Smith (2013). The Importance of What They Care About. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):297-314.
    Many forms of contemporary morality treat the individual as the fundamental unit of moral importance. Perhaps the most striking example of this moral vision of the individual is the contemporary global human rights regime, which treats the individual as, for all intents and purposes, sacrosanct. This essay attempts to explore one feature of this contemporary understanding of the moral status of the individual, namely the moral significance of a subject’s actual affective states, and in particular her cares and commitments. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  12
    Nabil Ibrahim & John Angelidis (2009). The Relative Importance of Ethics as a Selection Criterion for Entry-Level Public Accountants: Does Gender Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):49 - 58.
    This paper examines public accountants' perceptions of the relative importance of business ethics as a selection criterion for entry-level public accounting positions. Also, it seeks to determine whether gender differences do exist with respect to these perceptions. The data were collected through a survey of 335 professional accountants in four southeastern states. The results show that, among the eight selection factors that were studied, technical competence in accounting, communication skills, and interpersonal skills were the most influential, while professionalism and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  22
    L. Nathan Oaklander (2001). The Importance of Time (Philosophical Studies Series). In Proceedings of the Philosophy of Time Society, 1995-2000. Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
    The Importance of Time is a unique work that reveals the central role of the philosophy of time in major areas of philosophy. The first part of the book consists of symposia on two of the most important works in the philosophy of time over the past decade: Michael Tooley's Time, Tense, and Causation and D.H. Mellor's Real Time II. What characterizes these essays, and those that follow, are the interchanges between original papers, with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  24
    Timothy R. Rice, Yuriy Dobry, Vladan Novakovic & Jacob M. Appel (2012). The Importance of Patient–Provider Communication in End-of-Life Care. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):439-441.
    Successful formulation and implementation of end-of-life care requires ongoing communication with the patient. When patients, for reasons of general medical or psychiatric illness, fail to verbally communicate, providers must be receptive to messages conveyed through alternate avenues of communication. We present the narrative of a man with schizophrenia who wished to forgo hemodialysis as a study in the ethical importance of attention to nonverbal communication. A multilayered understanding of the patient, as may be provided by both behavioral and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  5
    T. J. Harvey (2006). Gender Differences in Subject Preference and Perception of Subject Importance Among Third Year Secondary School Pupils in Single‐Sex and Mixed Comprehensive Schools. Educational Studies 10 (3):243-253.
    (1984). Gender Differences in Subject Preference and Perception of Subject Importance among Third Year Secondary School Pupils in Single‐sex and Mixed Comprehensive Schools. Educational Studies: Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 243-253.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40.  20
    Warren T. Reich (2001). The Care-Based Ethic of Nazi Medicine and the Moral Importance of What We Care About. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):64-74.
    (2001). The Care-Based Ethic of Nazi Medicine and the Moral Importance of What We Care About. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 64-74.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41. Al Gini (2003). The Importance of Being Lazy: In Praise of Play, Leisure, and Vacation. Routledge.
    Drawing upon in-depth case studies of vacation habits and the observations of philosophers, writers, and sociologists such as Aristotle, Mark Twain and Thorstein Veblen, Al Gini argues why vacations are so venerated and why 'doing nothing' is a fundamental human necessity. From shopping sprees and extreme sports to the ultimate vacation - retirement - The Importance of Being lazy demonstrates that without true leisure, we are diminished as individuals and as a society.  .
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  8
    Robert Rosenberger (2013). The Importance of Generalized Bodily Habits for a Future World of Ubiquitous Computing. AI and Society 28 (3):289-296.
    In a future world of ubiquitous computing, in which humans interact with computerized technologies even more frequently and in even more situations than today, interface design will have increased importance. One feature of interface that I argue will be especially relevant is what I call abstract relational strategies. This refers to an approach (in both a bodily and conceptual sense) toward the use of a technology, an approach that is general enough to be applied in many different concrete (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  4
    Matthew W. Keefer, Sara E. Wilson, Harry Dankowicz & Michael C. Loui (2013). The Importance of Formative Assessment in Science and Engineering Ethics Education: Some Evidence and Practical Advice. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-12.
    Recent research in ethics education shows a potentially problematic variation in content, curricular materials, and instruction. While ethics instruction is now widespread, studies have identified significant variation in both the goals and methods of ethics education, leaving researchers to conclude that many approaches may be inappropriately paired with goals that are unachievable. This paper speaks to these concerns by demonstrating the importance of aligning classroom-based assessments to clear ethical learning objectives in order to help students and instructors track their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  4
    Andrew Stables & Felicity Wikeley (1997). Changes in Preference for and Perceptions of Relative Importance of Subjects During a Period of Educational Reform. Educational Studies 23 (3):393-403.
    This research formed phase 1 of the Economic and Social Research Council project ‘Pupils’ Approaches to Subject Option Choices’ and is a near repeat of a project carried out in the mid-1980s, thus allowing for a comparison of approaches to subject choice a decade apart, comparing the situation pre- and post-National Curriculum implementation. The simple two-part questionnaire, completed by 1600 children in 11 schools, shows the differences across time and between-school differences in subject preference, but little instability in perceptions of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  45. Alec D. Walen & David Wasserman, A Reply to Thomson on 'Turning the Trolley'; a Case Study Illustrating the Importance of a Hohfeldian Analysis of the 'Mechanics' of Rights.
    In her latest writing on the trolley problem, 'Turning the Trolley,' Judith Jarvis Thomson defends the following counter-intuitive position: if confronted with a choice of allowing a trolley to hit and kill five innocent people on the track straight ahead, or turning it onto one innocent person on a side-track, a bystander must allow it to hit the five straight ahead. In contrast, Thomson claims, the driver of the trolley has a duty to turn it from the five onto the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Timothy L. S. Sprigge (2011). The Importance of Subjectivity: Selected Essays in Metaphysics and Ethics. Clarendon Press.
    Part I: Consciousness and the metaphysics of experience. Orientations. What I believe. The privacy of experience. Final causes. The importance of subjectivity : an inaugural lecture. Is consciousness mysterious? Consciousness. The distinctiveness of American philosophy. The world of description and the world of acquaintance -- Part II: The metaphysics of time and the absolute. The unreality of time. Ideal immortality. Russell and Bradley on relations. The self and its world in Bradley and Husserl. Absolute idealism. Pantheism -- Part III: (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  23
    Jan-Willem van der Rijt (2009). Republican Dignity: The Importance of Taking Offence. Law and Philosophy 28 (5):465-492.
    This paper analyses the republican notion of non-domination from the viewpoint of individual dignity. It determines the aspect of individual dignity that republicans are concerned with and scrutinises how it is safeguarded by non-domination. I argue that the notion of non-domination as it is formulated by Pettit contains a number of ambiguities that need to be addressed. I discuss these ambiguities and argue for specific solutions that place great importance on a person’s moral beliefs and his status as a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  90
    Norman Mooradian (2009). The Importance of Privacy Revisited. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):163-174.
    James Rachels’ seminal paper “ Why Privacy Is Important ” (1975) remains one of the most influential statements on the topic. It offers a general theory that explains why privacy is important in relation to mundane personal information and situations. According to the theory, privacy is important because it allows us to selectively disclose personal information and to engage in behaviors appropriate to and necessary for creating and maintaining diverse personal relationships. Without this control, it is implied, the diversity of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  91
    Alain Morin (2001). The Split-Brain Debate Revisited: On the Importance of Language and Self-Recognition for Right Hemispheric Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):107-118.
    In this commentary I use recent empirical evidence and theoretical analyses concerning the importance of language and the meaning of self-recognition to reevaluate the claim that the right mute hemisphere in commissurotomized patients possesses a full consciousness. Preliminary data indicate that inner speech is deeply linked to self-awareness; also, four hypotheses concerning the crucial role inner speech plays in self-focus are presented. The legitimacy of self-recognition as a strong operationalization of self-awareness in the right hemisphere is also questioned on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50.  9
    Regina Queiroz (2012). The Importance of Phronesis as Communal Business Ethics Reasoning Principle. Philosophy of Management 11 (2):49-61.
    In this article I maintain the importance of the Aristotelian concept of prudence or phronesis applied to business ethics, distinguishing its meaning from Solomon and Hartman’s approaches to Aristotelian business ethics. Whereas Solomon stresses the value of perception of particulars and Hartman criticizes the incapacity of Aristotelian phronesis to dwell with the interests of others, I advocate that Aristotelian virtue ethics is important because the concept of phronesisdoes three things: (a) stresses the rational calculation and general principles or rules (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000