Search results for 'Incarnation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael C. Rea (2011). Hylomorphism and the Incarnation. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford University Press
    In this paper I provide a metaphysical account of the incarnation that starts from substantive assumptions about the nature of natures and about the metaphysics of the Trinity and develops in light of these a story about the relations among the elements involved in the incarnation. Central to the view I will describe are two features of Aristotle's metaphysics, though I do not claim that my own development of these ideas is anything of which Aristotle himself would have (...)
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  2. Thomas D. Senor (2007). The Compositional Account of the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):52-71.
    In a pair of recent articles, Brian Leftow and Eleonore Stump offer independent, although similar, accounts of the metaphysics of the Incarnation. Both believe that their Aquinas-inspired theories can offer solutions to the kind of Leibniz’s Law problems that can seem to threaten the logical possibility of this traditional Christian doctrine. In this paper, I’ll have a look at their compositional account of the nature of God incarnate. In the end, I believe their position can be seen to have (...)
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  3.  97
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (2015). Leibniz’s Theory of Substance and His Metaphysics of the Incarnation. In Paul Lodge & T. W. C. Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance and Identity. Routledge 231-252.
    This paper explores the development of Leibniz’s metaphysics of the Incarnation in the context of his philosophy. In particular it asks to what extent Leibniz’s repeated endorsement of the traditional analogy between the union in humankind of soul (mind) and body, and the union in Christ of divine and human natures, could be accommodated by his more general metaphysical doctrines. Such an investigation highlights some of the deepest commitments in Leibniz’s theory of substance as well as detect in it (...)
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  4. Paolo Diego Bubbio (2014). God, Incarnation, and Metaphysics in Hegel's Philosophy of Religion. Sophia (4):1-19.
    In this article, I draw upon the ‘post-Kantian’ reading of Hegel to examine the consequences Hegel’s idea of God has on his metaphysics. In particular, I apply Hegel’s ‘recognition-theoretic’ approach to his theology. Within the context of this analysis, I focus especially on the incarnation and sacrifice of Christ. First, I argue that Hegel’s philosophy of religion employs a distinctive notion of sacrifice (kenotic sacrifice). Here, sacrifice is conceived as a giving up something of oneself to ‘make room’ for (...)
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  5.  14
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (2007). Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century. Yale University Press.
    Throughout his long intellectual life, Leibniz penned his reflections on Christian theology, yet this wealth of material has never been systematically gathered or studied. This book addresses an important and central aspect of these neglected materials—Leibniz’s writings on two mysteries central to Christian thought, the Trinity and the Incarnation. -/- From Antognazza’s study emerges a portrait of a thinker surprisingly receptive to traditional Christian theology and profoundly committed to defending the legitimacy of truths beyond the full grasp of human (...)
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  6.  60
    Timothy J. Bayne (2001). The Inclusion Model of the Incarnation: Problems and Prospects. Religious Studies 37 (2):125-141.
    Thomas Morris and Richard Swinburne have recently defended what they call the ‘two-minds’ model of the Incarnation. This model, which I refer to as the ‘inclusion model’ or ‘inclusionism’, claims that Christ had two consciousnesses, a human and a divine consciousness, with the former consciousness contained within the latter one. I begin by exploring the motivation for, and structure of, inclusionism. I then develop a variety of objections to it: some philosophical, others theological in nature. Finally, I sketch a (...)
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  7.  52
    Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.) (2011). The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford University Press, USA.
    This book offers original essays by leading philosophers of religion representing these new approaches to theological problems such as incarnation.
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  8.  10
    Joseph Jedwab (2015). Against the Geachian Theory of the Trinity and Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):125-145.
    Relative-identity theories of the Trinity and Incarnation are worth another look. But not all such theories are the same. One important difference among them concerns restricted quantification. Peter Geach proposes two theses: the sortal relativity of identity and the irreducibility of restricted quantification. Every relative-identity theory of the Trinity and Incarnation applies Geach’s first thesis. But only what I call “the Geachian theory” applies both theses. I argue that any such Geachian theory faces significant theoretical disadvantages. Towards the (...)
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  9.  31
    Michael Gorman (2011). Incarnation. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press
    According to Christian belief, Jesus Christ is a divine person who became “incarnate,” i.e., who became human. A key event in the second act of the drama of creation and redemption, the incarnation could not have failed to interest Aquinas, and he discusses it in a number of places. A proper understanding of what he thought about it is thus part of any complete understanding of his work. It is, furthermore, a window into his ideas on a variety of (...)
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  10. Richard Cross (2002). The Metaphysics of the Incarnation Thomas Aquinas to Duns Scotus. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    The period from Thomas Aquinas to Duns Scotus is one of the richest in the history of Christian theology. The Metaphysics of the Incarnation provides a through examination of the doctrine in this era, making explicit its philosophical and theological foundations, and drawing conclusions for modern Christology.
     
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  11.  1
    James M. Arcadi (2015). Impanation, Incarnation, and Enabling Externalism. Religious Studies 51 (1):75-90.
    I articulate a real presence theory of the Eucharist that is coherent, attractive, and utilizes the resources of contemporary Christology. First, I review some of the recent analytic discussions of the metaphysics of the incarnation. From this, I distinguish two types of impanation, which I name Type-H and Type-S Impanation. I then exposit Type-S Impanation utilizing the notion of enabling externalism. I raise two potential objections to this view, the responses to which allows me to highlight the incarnation-like (...)
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  12.  27
    Jonathan Kvanvig (2010). The Incarnation and the Knowability Paradox. Synthese 173 (1):89 - 105.
    The best defense of the doctrine of the Incarnation implies that traditional Christianity has a special stake in the knowability paradox, a stake not shared by other theistic perspectives or by non-traditional accounts of the Incarnation. Perhaps, this stake is not even shared by antirealism, the view most obviously threatened by the paradox. I argue for these points, concluding that these results put traditional Christianity at a disadvantage compared to other viewpoints, and I close with some comments about (...)
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  13.  6
    Nicolas de Warren (2009). Imagination et incarnation. Methodos 9.
    Il n’est pas inhabituel de considérer l’imagination comme une conscience d’objets non réels, ayant la forme d’images internes ou de représentations privées de toute incarnation spatiale. Dans cet article j’interroge la phénoménologie de l’imagination de Husserl à partir de deux questions : l’imagination est-elle un type de conscience d’image ? L’imagination, est-elle privée de toute incarnation spatiale ? Après avoir reconstruit la distinction nette opérée par Husserl entre imagination et conscience d’image (l’imaginaire n’est pas une image mentale interne), (...)
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  14. Gloria L. Schaab (2012). Trinity in Relation: Creation, Incarnation, and Grace in an Evolving Cosmos. Anselm Academic.
    1. To be is to be-in-relation -- 2. Cosmic being as relation -- 3. Human being as relation -- 4. Divine being as relation -- 5. Divine and cosmic being in relation -- 6. Creation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 7. Incarnation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 8. Grace as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 9. Living in trinitarian relation.
     
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  15.  11
    James K. A. Smith (2002). Speech and Theology: Language and the Logic of Incarnation. Routledge.
    This important contribution to the ground-breaking Radical Orthodoxy series revisits the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Augustine and Derrida to reconsider the challenge of speaking of God through predication, silence, confession and praise. James K. A. Smith argues for God's own refusal to avoid speaking as well as for our urgent need of words to make Him visible to us. This leads to a radical new "incarnational phenomenology" in which God's love endows imperfect signs with the means to indicate true states (...)
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  16.  1
    Timothy O'Connor & Philip Woodward (2014). Incarnation and the Multiverse. In Klaas Kraay (ed.), God and the Multiverse: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Perspectives. Routledge 227-241.
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  17.  3
    Emmanuel de Saint Aubert (2008). « L'Incarnation change tout ». Archives de Philosophie 3:371-405.
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  18. Etienne Gilson, Eric Augustine, Marie-Anne Rebillard & Vannier (1999). Philosophie Et Incarnation Selon Saint Augustin Suivi de Saint Augustin : Lettre Xviii ; Sermon Contre les Païens. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  19. Masumbuko Mununguri (1997). The Closeness of the God of Our Ancestors: An African Approach to the Incarnation. Marist International Centre.
     
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  20.  29
    Lauge Olaf Nielsen (1981/1982). Theology and Philosophy in the Twelfth Century: A Study of Gilbert Porreta's Thinking and the Theological Expositions of the Doctrine of the Incarnation During the Period 1130-1180. Brill.
    Introduction The task of perusing the writings of Gilbert Porreta, and of endeavouring to comprehend the ideas expressed in them, is one whose difficulty ...
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  21.  66
    Andrew Loke (2009). On the Coherence of the Incarnation: The Divine Preconscious Model. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 51 (1):50-63.
    Many skeptics throughout the centuries have accused the New Testament characterization of the incarnation as being incoherent. The reason is that it appears impossible that any person can exemplify human properties such as ignorance, fatigability, and spatial limitation, as the New Testament testifies of Jesus, while possessing divine properties such as omniscience, omnipotence, and omnipresence at the same time. This paper proposes a possible model which asserts that at the incarnation, the Logo's mind was divided into conscious and (...)
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  22.  35
    Hunter Brown (2013). Incarnation and the Divine Hiddenness Debate. Heythrop Journal 54 (2):252-260.
    This paper examines the debate that has arisen in connection with J. L. Schellenberg's work on divine hiddenness. It singles out as especially deserving of attention Paul Moser's proposal that the debate distinguish more clearly between classical theism and Hebraic theisms. This worthwhile proposal, I argue, will be unlikely to exert its full potential influence upon the debate unless certain features of Christian incarnation belief are recognized and addressed in connection with it.
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  23. Thomas D. Senor (1991). God, Supernatural Kinds, and the Incarnation. Religious Studies 27 (3):353-370.
    Traditionally, the term ’God’ has been understood either as a proper name or as a description. However, according to a new view, the term God’ in a sentence like "Jesus Christ is God" functions as a kind term, much as the term ’tiger’ functions in the sentence "Tigger is a tiger." In this paper I examine the claim that divinity can be construed as a ’supernatural’ kind, developing the outlines of an account of the semantics of God’ along these lines, (...)
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  24. Thomas Flint (2011). Should Concretists Part with Mereological Models of the Incarnation? In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. OUP Oxford
     
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  25. Thomas P. Flint (2004). Risky Business: Open Theism and the Incarnation. Philosophia Christi 6 (2):213 - 233.
    The debate within the Christian academic community over open theism, or "openism", has been quite intense of late. Progress in this debate depends upon our examining how openism and its rivals fare when applied to particular Christian doctrines, beliefs, and practices. I hope to further the debate by raising a question regarding the Incarnation: ’Was Jesus Christ free in a morally significant way?’ After arguing that the two principal alternatives to openism (Thomism and Molinism) can offer internally plausible answers (...)
     
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  26.  62
    Peter Forrest (2000). The Incarnation: A Philosophical Case for Kenosis. Religious Studies 36 (2):127-140.
    As a preliminary, I shall clarify the kenotic position by arguing that a position which is often called kenotic is actually a quasi-kenotic version of the classical account, according to which Jesus had normal divine powers but chose not to exercise them. After this preliminary, I discuss three problems with the strict kenotic account. The first is that kenosis conflicts with the standard list of attributes considered essential to God. The second problem is posed by the Exaltation, namely the resumption (...)
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  27.  17
    Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (2008). Modeling the Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 20 (1-2):99 - 128.
    What metaphysics can plausibly back up the claim that God became incarnate? In this essay we investigate the main kinds of models of incarnation that have been historically proposed. We highlight the philosophical assumptions in each model, and on this basis offer novel ways of grouping them as metaphysical rather than doctrinal positions. We examine strengths and weaknesses of the models, and argue that ’composition models’ offer the most promising way forward to account for the pivotal Christian belief that, (...)
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  28.  15
    Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1-2):27 - 48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called "compositional models" of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is (...)
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  29.  66
    Alfred Freddoso (1986). Human Nature, Potency and the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 3 (1):27-53.
    According to the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation, the Son of God is truly but only contingently a human being. But is it also the case that Christ’s individual human nature is only contingently united to a divine person? The affirmative answer to this question, explicitly espoused by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, turns out to be philosophically untenable, while the negative answer, which is arguably implicit in St. Thomas Aquinas, explication of the Incarnation, has some surprising (...)
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  30.  49
    Thomas P. Flint (2001). The Possibilities of Incarnation: Some Radical Molinist Suggestions. Religious Studies 37 (3):307-320.
    The traditional doctrine of the Incarnation maintains that God became man. But was it necessary that God become the particular man He in fact became? Could some man or woman other than the man born in Bethlehem roughly two thousand years ago have been assumed by the Son to effect our salvation? This essay addresses such questions from the perspective of one embracing Molina's picture of divine providence. After showing how Molina thought his theory of middle knowledge helps alleviate (...)
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  31.  10
    Pamela Sue Anderson (2006). Divinity, Incarnation and Intersubjectivity: On Ethical Formation and Spiritual Practice. Philosophy Compass 1 (3):335-356.
    In what sense, if any, does the dominant conception of the traditional theistic God as disembodied inform our embodied experiences? Feminist philosophers of religion have been either explicitly or implicitly preoccupied by a philosophical failure to address such questions concerning embodiment and its relationship to the divine. To redress this failure, certain feminist philosophers have sought to appropriate Luce Irigaray’s argument that embodied divinity depends upon women themselves becoming divine. This article assesses weaknesses in the Irigarayan position, notably the problematic (...)
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  32.  63
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (2001). The Defence of the Mysteries of the Trinity and the Incarnation: An Example of Leibniz's 'Other' Reason. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):283 – 309.
    In this paper I will discuss certain aspects of Leibniz's theory and practice of 'soft reasoning' as exemplified by his defence of two central mysteries of the Christian revelation: the Trinity and the Incarnation. By theory and practice of 'soft' or 'broad' reasoning, I mean the development of rational strategies which can successefully be applied to the many areas of human understanding which escape strict demonstration, that is, the 'hard' or 'narrow' reasoning typical of mathematical argumentation. These strategies disclose (...)
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  33. Joseph Jedwab (2011). The Incarnation and Unity of Consciousness. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. OUP Oxford
     
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  34.  83
    Robin Le Poidevin (2009). Incarnation: Metaphysical Issues. Philosophy Compass 4 (4):703-714.
    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw a resurgence of realism in various areas of philosophy, including metaphysics and the philosophy of religion, and this trend has continued in the first decade of the twenty-first century. In philosophy of religion this led to explorations of the philosophical coherence of orthodox doctrines, such as the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation. In metaphysics, there was renewed interest in debates concerning persistence, composition, the relation between mind and body, (...)
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  35.  15
    Brian Leftow (1995). Anselm on the Beauty of the Incarnation. Modern Schoolman 72 (2-3):109 - 124.
    Among the objections to the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation which Anselm takes up in ’Cur Deus Nomo’ is an argument that a wise God would not act so, because it is inefficient. I explicate Anselm’s reply to this. It is (I argue) that the Incarnation is an elegant way to achieve a large set of goods including human salvation, and that God might well be wise to treat a sort of beauty the Incarnation involves as a (...)
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  36.  15
    Katherin A. Rogers (2013). The Incarnation As Action Composite. Faith and Philosophy 30 (3):251-270.
    The Council of Chalcedon insisted that God Incarnate is one person with two natures, one divine and one human. Recently critics have rightly argued that God Incarnate cannot be a composite person. In the present paper I defend a new composite theory using the analogy of a boy playing a video game. The analogy suggests that the Incarnation is God doing something. The Incarnation is what I label an “action composite” and is a state of affairs, constituted by (...)
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  37.  16
    Thomas D. Senor (2007). The Compositional Account of the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):52-71.
    In a pair of recent articles, Brian Leftow and Eleonore Stump offer independent, although similar, accounts of the metaphysics of the Incarnation. Both believe that their Aquinas-inspired theories can offer solutions to the kind of Leibniz’s Law problems that can seem to threaten the logical possibility of this traditional Christian doctrine. In this paper, I’ll have a look at their compositional account of the nature of God incarnate. In the end, I believe their position can be seen to have (...)
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  38.  40
    Robin le Poidevin (2011). The Incarnation: Divine Embodiment and the Divided Mind. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 68 (68):269-285.
    The central doctrine of traditional Christianity, the doctrine of the Incarnation, is that the Second Person of the Trinity lived a human existence on Earth as Jesus Christ for a finite period. In the words of the Nicene Creed, the Son is him who for us men, and for our salvation, came down from heaven, and was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, and was made man.
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  39.  28
    Allan Bäck (1982). Aquinas on the Incarnation. New Scholasticism 56 (2):127-145.
    IN THIS PAPER THE AUTHOR DEALS WITH AQUINAS’ SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEM, WHETHER THE DOCTRINE OF THE INCARNATION IS CONSISTENT. HE FIRST SHOWS WHY THERE IS A PROBLEM OF CONSISTENCY WITH THIS DOCTRINE, GIVEN ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN BELIEFS. HE THEN CLAIMS THAT AQUINAS HAS TWO SOLUTIONS, AND THAT BOTH FAIL: THE FIRST SOLUTION, AS SCOTUS ALSO OBSERVES, DOES NOT RESOLVE THE APPARENT INCONSISTENCY, AND THE OTHER DEPENDS ON MAKING HUMANITY ACCIDENTAL TO CHRIST, AND HENCE ON ABANDONING THE ORTHODOX POSITION.
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  40.  58
    Allan Bäck (1998). Scotus on the Consistency of the Incarnation and the Trinity. Vivarium 36 (1):83-107.
    Medieval theologians discussed the logical structure of reduplicative propositions in the midst of their discussions of the Incarnation and the Trinity. Aquinas has the usual medieval analyzes of reduplicative propositions: the specificative and the strictly reduplicative. But neither analysis resolves successfully the problems of the consistency of the statements about God while avoiding making the Trinity or the Incarnation a merely accidental feature of Him. However, Scotus introduces another analysis: abstractive. I shall conclude that Scotus’s view of reduplication, (...)
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  41.  15
    Alfred J. Freddoso (1986). Human Nature, Potency and the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 3 (1):27-53.
    According to the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation, the Son of God is truly but only contingently a human being. But is it also the case that Christ’s individual human nature is only contingently united to a divine person? The affirmative answer to this question, explicitly espoused by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, turns out to be philosophically untenable, while the negative answer, which is arguably implicit in St. Thomas Aquinas, explication of the Incarnation, has some surprising (...)
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  42.  12
    Raphaël Gély (2005). Émotion, imagination, incarnation: Réflexion à partir de l'Esquisse d'une théorie des émotions. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 1 (1).
    Table des matières 1. Émotion et situation 2. La performativité de l?émotion 3. Émotion et action 4. L?imaginaire et la facticité du réel 5. La théâtralité originaire de l?agir 6. Jeu et incarnation 7. Croyance, sens, imaginaire 8. La performativité de l?image 9. Le corps de l?image, l?image du corps 10. L?imaginaire et l?épaisseur de la vie 11. La théâtralisation de l?émotion 12. Émotion et influence sociale 13. Conclusion.
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  43.  16
    Anna Marmodoro (2010). Composition Models of the Incarnation: Unity and Unifying Relations. Religious Studies 46 (4):469 - 488.
    In this paper we investigate composition models of incarnation, according to which Christ is a compound of qualitatively and numerically different constituents. We focus on three-part models, according to which Christ is composed of a divine mind, a human mind, and a human body. We consider four possible relational structures that the three components could form. We argue that a ’hierarchy of natures’ model, in which the human mind and body are united to each other in the normal way, (...)
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  44.  26
    Jonathan Hill (2012). Incarnation, Timelessness, and Exaltation. Faith and Philosophy 29 (1):3-29.
    Christian tradition holds not simply that, in Christ, God became human, but that at the end of his earthly career Christ became exalted (possessing andexercising the divine attributes such as omnipotence and omniscience), and yet remained perpetually human. In this paper I consider several models ofthe incarnation in the light of these requirements. In particular, I contrast models that adopt a temporalist understanding of divine eternity with those that adopt an atemporalist one. I conclude that temporalist models struggle to (...)
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  45.  29
    William F. Vallicella (2002). Incarnation and Identity. Philo 5 (1):84-93.
    The characteristic claim of Christianity, as codified at Chalcedon, is that God the Son, the second person of the Trinity, is numerically the same person as Jesus of Nazareth. This article raises three questions that appear to threaten the coherence of orthodox Chalcedonian incarnationalism. First, how can one person exemplify seemingly incompatible natures? Second, how can one person exemplify seemingly incompatible non-nature properties? Third, how can there be one person if the concept of incarnation implies that one person incarnates (...)
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  46.  15
    Brian Leftow (1995). Anselm on the Necessity of the Incarnation. Religious Studies 31 (2):167 - 185.
    Anselm's "Cur Deus" Homo argues that only by the Incarnation can God save humanity. This seems to sit ill with the claim that God is omnipotent and absolutely free, for this entails that God could save humanity in other ways. I show that features of Anselm's concept of God and treatment of necessity make the claim that the Incarnation is a necessary means of salvation problematic. I then show that for Anselm, all conditions which make the Incarnation (...)
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  47.  27
    Jonathan Hill (2008). Modeling the Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 20 (1/2):99-128.
    What metaphysics can plausibly back up the claim that God became incarnate? In this essay we investigate the main kinds of models of incarnation that have been historically proposed. We highlight the philosophical assumptions in each model, and on this basis offernovel ways of grouping them as metaphysical rather than doctrinal positions. We examine strengths and weaknesses of the models,and argue that ‘composition models’ offer the most promising way forward to account for the pivotal Christian belief that, in Christ,true (...)
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  48.  13
    Noel Sheth (2002). Hindu Avatāra and Christian Incarnation: A Comparison. Philosophy East and West 52 (1):98-125.
    After tracing the development of the doctrines of avatāra and incarnation, the two are compared and contrasted. Some nuanced differences are: (1) Avatāras descend repeatedly, while Christ comes only once. However, we must also reckon with the Second Coming of Christ and the possibility of many incarnations. (2) The avatāra is real but perfect because it is made of "pure matter," while the incarnation is imperfect. (3) Avatāras have different purposes and, unlike the incarnation, not every Avatāra (...)
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  49. Richard Swinburne (2011). The Coherence of the Chalcedonian Definition of the Incarnation. In A. Marmodoro & J. Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford Up
     
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  50.  23
    Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):27-48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called “compositional models” of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is (...)
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