Search results for 'Incarnation Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paolo Diego Bubbio (2014). God, Incarnation, and Metaphysics in Hegel's Philosophy of Religion. Sophia (4):1-19.
    In this article, I draw upon the ‘post-Kantian’ reading of Hegel to examine the consequences Hegel’s idea of God has on his metaphysics. In particular, I apply Hegel’s ‘recognition-theoretic’ approach to his theology. Within the context of this analysis, I focus especially on the incarnation and sacrifice of Christ. First, I argue that Hegel’s philosophy of religion employs a distinctive notion of sacrifice (kenotic sacrifice). Here, sacrifice is conceived as a giving up something of oneself to ‘make room’ (...)
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  2.  2
    J. E. Barnhart (1967). Incarnation and Process Philosophy. Religious Studies 2 (2):225 - 232.
    The purpose of this article is to develop a Christian doctrine of the Incarnation in the light of a process philosophy of the type expounded by A. N. Whitehead and E. S. Brightman. Rather than offer at this time a detailed defence either of the idea of incarnation or of process philosophy, I wish to show that the two can be coherently related in such a way that each receives a greater degree of completion and clarity. (...)
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    Lauge Olaf Nielsen (1981). Theology and Philosophy in the Twelfth Century: A Study of Gilbert Porreta's Thinking and the Theological Expositions of the Doctrine of the Incarnation During the Period 1130-1180. Brill.
    Introduction The task of perusing the writings of Gilbert Porreta, and of endeavouring to comprehend the ideas expressed in them, is one whose difficulty ...
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  4.  24
    Michael McGhee (2011). Is Nothing Sacred? A Secular Philosophy of Incarnation. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):169-188.
    Christian thinkers have recently expressed concern about the “silencing” or marginalisation of religion in public life, have affirmed the desirability of dialogue between the world of faith and the world of reason but have raised doubts about the feasibility of a moral language that refers to unconditional moral claims or human rights or the intrinsic dignity of human beings if it is not grounded in a transcendent or supernatural source of value. The present paper is an attempt to open a (...)
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  5. Harry Austryn Wolfson (1956). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers, Volume I: Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Harvard Univ Pr.
    A MONUMENTAL WORK OF SCHOLARSHIP, CONSISTING OF THOROUGH AND COMPREHENSIVE TREATMENTS OF FOUR RELATIVELY DISTINCT MOTIFS IN THE THOUGHT OF THE EARLY CHURCH FATHERS. PART ONE DEALS WITH THE ORIGIN OF THE PROBLEM OF FAITH AND REASON, TOGETHER WITH THE VARIOUS SOLUTIONS PROPOSED; PART TWO TREATS THE TRINITY, THE LOGOS, AND PLATONIC IDEAS; PART THREE EXAMINES THE THREE CHRISTIAN "MYSTERIES"--THE TRINITY, THE INCARNATION, AND THE GENERATION OF THE LOGOS; AND PART FOUR DETAILS THE RISE OF THE HERESIES, PARTICULARLY GNOSTICISM. (...)
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  6.  8
    John P. Doyle (1984). Theology and Philosophy in the Twelfth Century: A Study of Gilbert Porreta's Thinking and the Theological Expositions of the Doctrine of the Incarnation During the Period 1130-1180. By Lauge Olaf Nielson. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 62 (1):66-67.
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  7.  18
    S. L. Greenslade (1957). Harry Austryn Wolfson: The Philosophy of the Church Fathers. Vol. I: Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Pp. Xxviii + 635. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1956. Cloth, 8Os. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (3-4):262-263.
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  8.  7
    A. C. P. (1956). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers, Vol. I, Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Structure and Growth of Philosophic Systems From Plato to Spinoza, III. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):186-186.
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  9.  2
    T. W. Bartel (1995). Trinity, Incarnation and Philosophy. Religious Studies 31 (3):391.
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    Marianne Djuth (2007). Philosophy in a Time of Exile: Vera Philosophia and the Incarnation. Augustinian Studies 38 (1):281-300.
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  11.  1
    C. P. A. (1956). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers, Vol. I, Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Structure and Growth of Philosophic Systems From Plato to Spinoza, III. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):186-186.
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  12. Marshall Clagett (1958). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers. Volume I, Faith, Trinity, Incarnation by Harry Austryn Wolfson. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 49:358-359.
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  13. Ulrich Engel (2008). Philosophy in the Light of Incarnation Gianni Vattimo Onkenosis. New Blackfriars 89 (1022):468-477.
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  14. Newell (1984). Theology and Philosophy in the Twelfth Century: A Study of Gilbert Porreta's Thinking and the Theological Expositions of the Doctrine of the Incarnation During the Period 1130-1180Lauge Olaf Nielsen. [REVIEW] Speculum 59 (2):425-427.
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  15. F. C. S. Schiller (1916). QUICK, O. C. -Modern Philosophy and the Incarnation. [REVIEW] Mind 25:124.
     
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  16. Harry Austryn Wolfson (1957). Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Vol. I of The Philosophy of the Church Fathers. Philosophical Review 66 (4):543-550.
  17. Harry A. Wolfson (1957). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers, I. Faith, Trinity, Incarnation. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 19 (3):507-509.
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  18.  59
    Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.) (2011). The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford University Press, USA.
    This book offers original essays by leading philosophers of religion representing these new approaches to theological problems such as incarnation.
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  19.  6
    Michael C. Rea (2011). Hylomorphism and the Incarnation. In Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (eds.), The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Oxford University Press
    In this paper I provide a metaphysical account of the incarnation that starts from substantive assumptions about the nature of natures and about the metaphysics of the Trinity and develops in light of these a story about the relations among the elements involved in the incarnation. Central to the view I will describe are two features of Aristotle's metaphysics, though I do not claim that my own development of these ideas is anything of which Aristotle himself would have (...)
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  20. Gloria L. Schaab (2012). Trinity in Relation: Creation, Incarnation, and Grace in an Evolving Cosmos. Anselm Academic.
    1. To be is to be-in-relation -- 2. Cosmic being as relation -- 3. Human being as relation -- 4. Divine being as relation -- 5. Divine and cosmic being in relation -- 6. Creation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 7. Incarnation as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 8. Grace as relation in an evolving cosmos -- 9. Living in trinitarian relation.
     
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  21.  12
    James K. A. Smith (2002). Speech and Theology: Language and the Logic of Incarnation. Routledge.
    This important contribution to the ground-breaking Radical Orthodoxy series revisits the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Augustine and Derrida to reconsider the challenge of speaking of God through predication, silence, confession and praise. James K. A. Smith argues for God's own refusal to avoid speaking as well as for our urgent need of words to make Him visible to us. This leads to a radical new "incarnational phenomenology" in which God's love endows imperfect signs with the means to indicate true states (...)
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  22.  7
    Emmanuel de Saint Aubert (2008). « L'Incarnation change tout ». Archives de Philosophie 3:371-405.
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  23.  64
    Justin Sytsma (2012). Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Disputes. Essays in Philosophy (1):9.
    One view of philosophy that is sometimes expressed, especially by scientists, is that while philosophers are good at asking questions, they are poor at producing convincing answers. And the perceived divide between philosophical and scientific methods is often pointed to as the major culprit behind this lack of progress. Looking back at the history of philosophy, however, we find that this methodological divide is a relatively recent invention. Further, it is one that has been challenged over the past (...)
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    Michael C. Rea & Michael Murray (2008). Philosophy and Christian Theology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Many of the doctrines central to Christianity have important philosophical implications or presuppositions. In this article, we begin with a brief general discussion of the relationship between philosophy and Christian dogma, and then we turn our attention to three of the most philosophically challenging Christian doctrines: the trinity, the incarnation, and the atonement. We take these three as our focus because, unlike (for example) doctrines about providence or the attributes of God, these are distinctive to Christian theology and, (...)
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  25. M. J. Edwards (2013). Image, Word, and God in the Early Christian Centuries. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..
    Seeing and hearing God in the Old Testament -- Seeing and hearing God in the New Testament -- Word and image in classical Greek philosophy -- Philosophers and sophists of the early Roman era -- Image, text and incarnation in the second century -- Image, text and incarnation in the third century -- Neoplatonism and the arts -- Image, text and incarnation in the fourth century -- Myth and text in proclus -- Christianity of Christian Platonism.
     
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  26. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2015). Leibniz’s Theory of Substance and His Metaphysics of the Incarnation. In Paul Lodge & T. W. C. Stoneham (eds.), Locke and Leibniz on Substance and Identity. Routledge 231-252.
    This paper explores the development of Leibniz’s metaphysics of the Incarnation in the context of his philosophy. In particular it asks to what extent Leibniz’s repeated endorsement of the traditional analogy between the union in humankind of soul (mind) and body, and the union in Christ of divine and human natures, could be accommodated by his more general metaphysical doctrines. Such an investigation highlights some of the deepest commitments in Leibniz’s theory of substance as well as detect in (...)
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  27.  29
    Michael J. Murray & Michael C. Rea (2008). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion provides a broad overview of the topics which are at the forefront of discussion in contemporary philosophy of religion. Prominent views and arguments from both historical and contemporary authors are discussed and analyzed. The book treats all of the central topics in the field, including the coherence of the divine attributes, theistic and atheistic arguments, faith and reason, religion and ethics, miracles, human freedom and divine providence, science and religion, and immortality. (...)
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  28. Dale M. Schlitt (1990). Divine Subjectivity: Understanding Hegel's Philosophy of Religion. University of Scranton Press.
    Hegel's philosophy of religion lecture texts. Critical editions-continuing the Hegel renaissance -- Hegel's tripartite philosophy of religion. The concept of religion ; Determinate religion ; The consummate religion -- Hegel's religious dialectic of identity and difference. Identity and religion ; The whole truth: trinity ; Incarnation and otherness ; The kingdom of God.
     
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  29.  8
    Christopher Stead (1994). Philosophy in Christian Antiquity. Cambridge University Press.
    Christianity began as a little-known Jewish sect, but rose within 300 years to dominate the civilised world. It owed its rise in part to inspired moral leadership, but also to its success in assimilating, criticising and developing the philosophies of the day, which offered rationally approved life-styles and moral directives. Without abandoning their allegiance to their founder and to Holy Scripture, Christians could therefore present their faith as a 'new philosophy'. This book, which is written for non-specialist readers, provides (...)
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  30.  85
    Robin Le Poidevin (2009). Incarnation: Metaphysical Issues. Philosophy Compass 4 (4):703-714.
    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw a resurgence of realism in various areas of philosophy, including metaphysics and the philosophy of religion, and this trend has continued in the first decade of the twenty-first century. In philosophy of religion this led to explorations of the philosophical coherence of orthodox doctrines, such as the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation. In metaphysics, there was renewed interest in debates concerning persistence, composition, the relation between (...)
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  31. Timothy Pawl (2016). In Defense of Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This work presents a historically informed, systematic exposition of the Christology of the first seven Ecumenical Councils of undivided Christendom, from the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD to the Second Council of Nicaea in 787 AD. Assuming the truth of Conciliar Christology for the sake of argument, Timothy Pawl considers whether there are good philosophical arguments that show a contradiction or incoherence in that doctrine. He presents the definitions of important terms in the debate and a helpful metaphysics (...)
     
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  32. Thomas D. Senor (2007). The Compositional Account of the Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):52-71.
    In a pair of recent articles, Brian Leftow and Eleonore Stump offer independent, although similar, accounts of the metaphysics of the Incarnation. Both believe that their Aquinas-inspired theories can offer solutions to the kind of Leibniz’s Law problems that can seem to threaten the logical possibility of this traditional Christian doctrine. In this paper, I’ll have a look at their compositional account of the nature of God incarnate. In the end, I believe their position can be seen to have (...)
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  33.  20
    Joseph Jedwab (2015). Against the Geachian Theory of the Trinity and Incarnation. Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):125-145.
    Relative-identity theories of the Trinity and Incarnation are worth another look. But not all such theories are the same. One important difference among them concerns restricted quantification. Peter Geach proposes two theses: the sortal relativity of identity and the irreducibility of restricted quantification. Every relative-identity theory of the Trinity and Incarnation applies Geach’s first thesis. But only what I call “the Geachian theory” applies both theses. I argue that any such Geachian theory faces significant theoretical disadvantages. Towards the (...)
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  34. Anthony O'Hear (ed.) (2011). Philosophy and Religion: Volume 68. Cambridge University Press.
    Surprising as it might have seemed not so long ago, in recent times religion has once again become a focus of lively debate. The exchanges between those for and against religion have, however, often thrown up heat, rather than light. As an attempted corrective, The Royal Institute of Philosophy asked a number of distinguished philosophers who are interested in religion to contribute to its annual lecture series for 2008–9. This volume contains essays based on the lectures. The topics covered (...)
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  35.  20
    Anna Marmodoro & Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1-2):27 - 48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called "compositional models" of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is (...)
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  36.  17
    Laurens ten Kate (2008). Intimate Distance: Rethinking the Unthought God in Christianity. Sophia 47 (3):327-343.
    The work of the French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy shares with the thinkers of the ‘theological turn in phenomenology’ the programmatic desire to place the ‘theological’, in the broad sense of rethinking the religious traditions in our secular time, back on the agenda of critical thought. Like those advocating a theological turn in phenomenology, Nancy’s deconstructive approach to philosophical analysis aims to develop a new sensibility for the other, for transcendence, conceptualized as the non-apparent in the realm of appearing phenomena. This (...)
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  37.  33
    Jonathan Hill (2010). Peter Abelard's Metaphysics of the Incarnation. Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):27-48.
    In this paper, we examine Abelard’s model of the incarnation and place it within the wider context of his views in metaphysics and logic. In particular, we consider whether Abelard has the resources to solve the major difficulties faced by the so-called “compositional models” of the incarnation, such as his own. These difficulties include: the requirement to account for Christ’s unity as a single person, despite being composed of two concrete particulars; the requirement to allow that Christ is (...)
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  38.  8
    Marc A. Hight (2010). The Son More Visible: Immaterialism and the Incarnation. Modern Theology 26 (1):120 - 148.
    In this article we argue that an immaterialist ontology -- a metaphysic that denies the existence of material substance -- is more consonant with Christian dogma than any ontology that includes the existence of material substance. We use the philosophy of the famous eighteenth-century Irish immaterialist George Berkeley as a guide while engaging one particularly difficult Christian mystery: the doctrine of the Incarnation of Christ. The goal is to make plausible the claim that, from the analysis of this (...)
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  39.  7
    Thomas F. Torrance (1969). Space, Time and Incarnation. Oxford Univ Pr.
    THE DOMINATING CONCEPT IN GREEK THOUGHT, SAYS TORRANCE, WAS A RECEPTACLE NOTION OF SPACE. THIS HAD NO PLACE IN THE NICENE THEOLOGY. WITH THE ASCENDANCY OF ARISTOTELIAN PHILOSOPHY THE RECEPTACLE NOTION OF SPACE DOMINATED MEDIEVAL THEOLOGY, AND THIS IS WHAT, DESPITE LUTHER’S INSIGHT INTO THE RELATION BETWEEN THE ONTOLOGICAL AND DYNAMIC WAYS OF THINKING OF THE REAL PRESENCE AND THE INCARNATION, PRODUCED THE SEPARATION BETWEEN THEM. THIS PROBLEM INHERITED BY MODERN THEOLOGY CAN ONLY BE SOLVED IF WE USE (...)
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  40.  12
    Michael C. Rea (ed.) (2009). Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology: Volume 1: Trinity, Incarnation, and Atonement. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past sixty years, within the analytic tradition of philosophy, there has been a significant revival of interest in the philosophy of religion. More recently, philosophers of religion have turned in a more self-consciously interdisciplinary direction, with special focus on topics that have traditionally been the provenance of systematic theologians in the Christian tradition. The present volumes Oxford Readings in Philosophical Theology, volumes 1 and 2 aim to bring together some of the most important essays on six (...)
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  41. Christopher Stead (2009). Philosophy in Christian Antiquity. Cambridge University Press.
    Christianity began as a little-known Jewish sect, but rose within 300 years to dominate the civilised world. It owed its rise in part to inspired moral leadership, but also to its success in assimilating, criticising and developing the philosophies of the day, which offered rationally approved life-styles and moral directives. Without abandoning their allegiance to their founder and to Holy Scripture, Christians could therefore present their faith as a 'new philosophy'. This book, which is written for non-specialist readers, provides (...)
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  42.  12
    Murray A. Rae (1997). Kierkegaard's Vision of the Incarnation: By Faith Transformed. Clarendon Press.
    In this study of the works of Sren Kierkegaard, Murray Rae focuses on his understanding of the Christian faith and the nature of Christian conversion. The transformation of an individual under the impact of revelation is explored both in terms of the New Testament concept of metanoia and in comparison with claims to cognitive progress in other fields.
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  43.  23
    Harry Austryn Wolfson (1956). The Philosophy of the Church Fathers. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
  44.  27
    Leonard Lawlor (2001). Natalie Depraz: Transcendence Et Incarnation: Le Statut de l'Intersubectivite Comme Alterite a Soi Chez Husserl. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (1):103-111.
  45.  21
    Percy W. Brown (1957). Emerson's Philosophy of Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (3):350-354.
    As this writer reads him, Emerson's thinking falls into three loose and broad categories. He held soul to be divine, that intuition or divine spark within every man, whereby every man is capable of infinite growth. He regarded Nature as the lengthened shadow of God cast upon human sense, a kind of incarnation of some Divine Power here on earth. And he believed Deity ever near to man, and every soul possessed of access to Deity, not continuously, but at (...)
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  46.  6
    Seamus O'Neill (2013). The Metaphysics of the Incarnation. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 33 (1):49-53.
  47.  12
    Sylvia Walsh (1999). Murray A. Rae, Kierkegaard's Vision of the Incarnation: By Faith Transformed. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 46 (3):191-193.
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  48. J. R. Illingworth (1898). Divine Immanence an Essay on the Spiritual Significance of Matter. Macmillan.
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  49. Paul Elmer More (1934). The Sceptical Approach to Religion. Princeton, Princeton University Press.
    Rationalism and faith.--The Socratic revolution.--Platonic idealism.--The Platonic teleology.--Illusions of reason.--The evolution of Hebraism.--The telos of Christianity.--The gift of hope.
     
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  50.  8
    Timothy Pawl & Kevin Timpe (2016). Freedom and the Incarnation. Philosophy Compass 11 (11):743-756.
    In this paper, we explore how free will should be understood within the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation, particularly on the assumption of traditional Christology. We focus on two issues: reconciling Christ's free will with the claim that Christ's human will was subjected to the divine will in the Incarnation; and reconciling the claims that Christ was fully human and free with the belief that Christ, since God, could not sin.
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