Search results for 'Inclination' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Arthur L. Miller & Richard Sheldon (1969). Magnitude Estimation of Average Length and Average Inclination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):16.score: 15.0
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  2. N. J. Wade (1972). Effect of Forward Head Inclination on Visual Orientation During Lateral Body Tilt. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):203.score: 15.0
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  3. Tamar Schapiro (2009). The Nature of Inclination. Ethics 119 (2):229–256.score: 12.0
    There is a puzzle in the very notion of passive motivation ("passion" or "inclination"). To be motivated is not simply to be moved from the outside. Motivation is in some sense self-movement. But how can an agent be passive with respect to her own motivation? How is passive motivation possible? In this paper I defend the ancient view that inclination stems from a motivational source independent of reason, a motivational source that is both agential and nonrational.
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  4. Joshua Earlenbaugh & Bernard Molyneux (2009). Intuitions Are Inclinations to Believe. Philosophical Studies 145 (1):89 - 109.score: 10.0
    Advocates of the use of intuitions in philosophy argue that they are treated as evidence because they are evidential. Their opponents agree that they are treated as evidence, but argue that they should not be so used, since they are the wrong kinds of things. In contrast to both, we argue that, despite appearances, intuitions are not treated as evidence in philosophy whether or not they should be. Our positive account is that intuitions are a subclass of inclinations to believe. (...)
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  5. Tamar Schapiro (2011). Foregrounding Desire: A Defense of Kant's Incorporation Thesis. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 15 (3):147-167.score: 9.0
    In this paper I defend Kant’s Incorporation Thesis, which holds that we must “incorporate” our incentives into our maxims if we are to act on them. I see this as a thesis about what is necessary for a human being to make the transition from ‘having a desire’ to ‘acting on it’. As such, I consider the widely held view that ‘having a desire’ involves being focused on the world, and not on ourselves or on the desire. I try to (...)
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  6. Jens Timmermann (2009). Acting From Duty: Inclination, Reason and Moral Worth. In , Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 9.0
    Section I of Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals is meant to lead us from our everyday conception of morality to the supreme principle of all moral action, officially christened the ‘categorical imperative’ some twenty Academy pages further into the treatise. It is quite striking that in this first section Kant dispenses with the notorious technical language that pervades not just other parts of the Groundwork but also most of the remaining philosophical writings of the critical period. The mere (...)
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  7. Andrews Reath (1989). Kant's Theory of Moral Sensibility. Respect for the Moral Law and the Influence of Inclination. Kant-Studien 80 (1-4):284-302.score: 9.0
  8. George Schrader (1968). Kant and Kierkegaard on Duty and Inclination. Journal of Philosophy 65 (21):688-701.score: 9.0
  9. Jonathan Schofer (2003). The Redaction of Desire: Structure and Editing of Rabbinic Teachings Concerning Ye#Duser ("Inclination"). Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (1):19-53.score: 9.0
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  10. Richard E. Aquila (1984). Duty and Inclination: The Fundamentals of Morality Discussed and Redefined with Special Regard to Kant and Schiller. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 1 (1):307-330.score: 9.0
  11. Jonathan Schofer (2003). The Redaction of Desire: Structure and Editing of Rabbinic Teachings Concerning Ye#Duser ("Inclination"). Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (1):19-53.score: 9.0
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  12. T. E. Wilkerson (1973). Duty, Inclination and Morals. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (90):28-40.score: 9.0
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  13. N. J. H. Dent (1974). Duty and Inclination. Mind 83 (332):552-570.score: 9.0
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  14. Alan R. White (1960). Inclination. Analysis 21 (2):40 - 42.score: 9.0
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  15. Robert M. Geraci (2012). Video Games and the Transhuman Inclination. Zygon 47 (4):735-756.score: 9.0
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  16. René Görtzen (1991). Duty and Inclination: The Phenomenological Value Ethics of Hans Reiner. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (2):119-145.score: 9.0
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  17. Bruce Kimball (1988). The Inclination of Modern Jurists to Associate Lawyers with Doctors: Plato's Response inGorgias 464–465. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):17-31.score: 9.0
    From the turn of the century, jurists have tended to associate lawyers with doctors as professionals and tried to ground this association in an analogy between law and medicine. Paradoxically, such comparisons suggest that American law and medicine are not analogous, while an analogy proposed by Plato illumines more fundamental respects in which law and medicine might be truly analogous.
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  18. John Arthur Passmore (1937). Reason and Inclination. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):24 – 38.score: 9.0
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  19. O. J. (1981). Le Jugement Par Inclination Chez Saint Thomas D'Aquin. Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):369-370.score: 9.0
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  20. Jean-Dominique Robert (1981). CALDERA, Rafael Tomás, Le Jugement Par Inclination Chez Saint Thomas d'Aquin. Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 37 (2):253-254.score: 9.0
  21. Ishay Rosen-Zvi (2009). Refuting the Yetzer: The Evil Inclination and the Limits of Rabbinic Discourse. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 17 (2):117-141.score: 9.0
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  22. A. K. Stout (1942). Duty and Inclination. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):184 – 202.score: 9.0
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  23. Audrey L. Anton (2006). Duty and Inclination. Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (1):199-207.score: 9.0
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  24. Darian C. de Bolt (2006). Comments on Anton's "Duty and Inclination. Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):135-138.score: 9.0
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  25. Donald F. Haggerty (1998). A Via Maritainia: Nonconceptual Knowledge by Virtuous Inclination. The Thomist 62 (1):75-96.score: 9.0
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  26. Nicholas Ingham (1996). The Rectitude of Inclination. The Thomist 60 (3):417-437.score: 9.0
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  27. Maria Luisa Esteve Montenegro & Jurgen Sprute (2008). Kant and Schiller on Duty and Inclination. Pensamiento 64 (239):129-142.score: 9.0
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  28. Leo Perdue (2003). The Redaction of Desire: Structure and Editing of Rabbinic Teachings Concerning Yēer ('Inclination').”. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12:19-53.score: 9.0
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  29. Nelson Potter (1985). Duty and Inclination. Review of Metaphysics 39 (1):165-167.score: 9.0
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  30. Hans Reiner (1983). Duty and Inclination: The Fundamentals of Morality Discussed and Redefined with Special Regard to Kant and Schiller. Distributors, Kluwer Boston.score: 9.0
  31. William L. Rossner (1974). An Inclination to an Intellectually Known Good. The Modern Schoolman 52 (1):65-92.score: 9.0
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  32. E. Tigchelaar (2008). The Evil Inclination in the Dead Sea Scrolls, with a Re-Edition of 4Q468i (4QSectarian Text?). In van der Horst, Pieter Willem, Alberdina Houtman, Albert de Jong, van de Weg & Magdalena Wilhelmina Misset (eds.), Empsychoi Logoi--Religious Innovations in Antiquity: Studies in Honour of Pieter Willem van der Horst. Brill.score: 9.0
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  33. Jason Brennan (2008). What If Kant Had Had a Cognitive Theory of the Emotions? In Valerio Hrsg v. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. Walter de Gruyter. 1--219.score: 7.0
    Emotional cognitivists, such as the Stoics and Aristotle, hold that emotions have cognitive content, whereas noncognitivists, like Plato and Kant, believe the emotions to be nonrational bodily movements. I ask, taking Martha Nussbaum's account of cognitivism, what if Kant had become convinced of a cognitive theory of the emotions, what changes would this require in his moral philosophy. Surprisingly, since this represents a radical shift in his psychology, it changes almost nothing. I show that Kant's account of continence, virtue, the (...)
     
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  34. Alan R. White (1967). The Philosophy Of Mind. Random House.score: 6.0
  35. T. F. Daveney (1961). Wanting. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (April):135-144.score: 6.0
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  36. Gregory B. Sadler (2007). Freedom, Inclinations of the Will, and Virtue in Anselm's Moral Th Eory. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:91-108.score: 6.0
    Freedom, justice, and inclinations of the will have significant roles in St. Anselm’s moral theory, as does, I argue, virtues and vices, which can be understoodin relation to freedom and justice and as inclinations of the will. The first section of the paper discusses the relationship between freedom, justice, and the will inAnselm’s works. The second part explores Anselm’s distinctions between different aspects of the human will, as will-as-instrument, will-as-use, and will-as-inclination, then examines his further distinction of the latter (...)
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  37. Alan R. White (1964). Attention. Oxford: Blackwell.score: 6.0
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  38. James L. Golden (1991). An Application of Michel Meyer's Theory of Problematology to David Hume's Diaologues Concerning Natural Religion. Argumentation 5 (1):69-89.score: 6.0
    This study advances the claim that Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, which drew its inspiration and guidelines from Cicero's De Natura Deorum, fulfills four basic elements of Michel Meyer's theory of problematology. In doing so, it is argued, the Dialogues contribute importantly to our understanding of the question-answer pair, and to the notion of rhetoric as a way of knowing.
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  39. Marinko Lolic (2011). Is Kant's Conception of Radical Evil Radical Enough. Filozofija I Drustvo 22 (4):23-36.score: 6.0
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  40. Paolo Palmieri (2011). A History of Galileo's Inclined Plane Experiment and its Philosophical Implications. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 5.0
     
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  41. Sean Greenberg (2005). From Canon to Dialectic to Antinomy: Giving Inclinations Their Due. Inquiry 48 (3):232 – 248.score: 4.0
    In a recent paper, Eckart Förster challenges interpreters to explain why in the first Critique practical reason has a canon but no dialectic, whereas in the second Critique, there is not only a dialectic, but an antinomy of practical reason. In the Groundwork, Kant claims that there is a natural dialectic with respect to morality (4:405), a different claim from those advanced in the first and second Critiques. Förster's challenge may therefore be reformulated as the problem of explaining why practical (...)
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  42. Jeff Greenberg, Daniel Sullivan, Spee Kosloff & Sheldon Solomon (2006). Souls Do Not Live by Cognitive Inclinations Alone, but by the Desire to Exist Beyond Death as Well. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):474-475.score: 4.0
    Bering's analysis is inadequate because it fails to consider past and present adult soul beliefs and the psychological functions they serve. We suggest that a valid folk psychology of souls must consider features of adult soul beliefs, the unique problem engendered by awareness of death, and terror management findings, in addition to cognitive inclinations toward dualistic and teleological thinking.
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  43. Barbara Herman (1981). On the Value of Acting From the Motive of Duty. Philosophical Review 90 (3):359-382.score: 3.0
    Richard Henson attempts to take the sting out of this view of Kant on moral worth by arguing (i) that attending to the phenomenon of the overdetermination of actions leads one to see that Kant might have had two distinct views of moral worth, only one of which requires the absence of cooperating inclinations, and (ii) that when Kant insists that there is moral worth only when an action is done from the motive of duty alone, he need not also (...)
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  44. Christine M. Korsgaard (1996). From Duty and for the Sake of the Noble: Kant and Aristotle on Morally Good Action. In Stephen Engstrom & Jennifer Whiting (eds.), Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. Cambridge University Press.score: 3.0
    Aristotle believes that an agent lacks virtue unless she enjoys the performance of virtuous actions, while Kant claims that the person who does her duty despite contrary inclinations exhibits a moral worth that the person who acts from inclination lacks. Despite these differences, this chapter argues that Aristotle and Kant share a distinctive view of the object of human choice and locus of moral value: that what we choose, and what has moral value, are not mere acts, but actions: (...)
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  45. Dima Jamali (2008). A Stakeholder Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility: A Fresh Perspective Into Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):213 - 231.score: 3.0
    Stakeholder theory has gained currency in the business and society literature in recent years in light␣of its practicality from the perspective of managers and scholars. In accounting for the recent ascendancy of␣stakeholder theory, this article presents an overview of␣two traditional conceptualizations of corporate social␣responsibility (CSR) (Carroll: 1979, ‹A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance', The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505 and Wood: 1991, ‹Corporate Social Performance Revisited', The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717), highlighting their predominant inclination toward (...)
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  46. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.score: 3.0
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but (...)
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  47. John Dupré (1995). The Solution to the Problem of the Freedom of the Will. Noûs 30:385 - 402.score: 3.0
    It has notoriously been supposed that the doctrine of determinism conflicts with the belief in human freedom. Yet it is not readily apparent how indeterminism, the denial of determinism, makes human freedom any less problematic. It has sometimes been suggested that the arrival of quantum mechanics should immediately have solved the problem of free will and determinism. It was proposed, perhaps more often by scientists than by philosophers, that the brain would need only to be fitted with a device for (...)
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  48. Joshua Earlenbaugh & Bernard Molyneux (2009). If Intuitions Must Be Evidential Then Philosophy is in Big Trouble. Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):35-53.score: 3.0
    Many philosophers claim that intuitions are evidential. Yet it is hard to see how introspecting one's mental states could provide evidence for such synthetic truths as those concerning, for example, the abstract and the counterfactual. Such considerations have sometimes been taken to lead to mentalism---the view that philosophy must concern itself only with matters of concept application or other mind-dependent topics suited to a contemplative approach---but this provides us with a poor account of what it is that philosophers take themselves (...)
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  49. Felipe De Brigard (2010). If You Like It, Does It Matter If It's Real? Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):43-57.score: 3.0
    Most people's intuitive reaction after considering Nozick's experience machine thought-experiment seems to be just like his: we feel very little inclination to plug in to a virtual reality machine capable of providing us with pleasurable experiences. Many philosophers take this empirical fact as sufficient reason to believe that, more than pleasurable experiences, people care about “living in contact with reality.” Such claim, however, assumes that people's reaction to the experience machine thought-experiment is due to the fact that they value (...)
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  50. Richard Kraut (2007). Nature in Aristotle's Ethics and Politics. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):199-219.score: 3.0
    Aristotle's doctrine that human beings are political animals is, in part, an empirical thesis, and posits an inclination to enter into cooperative relationships, even apart from the instrumental benefits of doing so. Aristotle's insight is that human cooperation rests on a non-rational propensity to trust even strangers, when conditions are favorable. Turning to broader questions about the role of nature in human development, I situate Aristotle's attitude towards our natural propensities between two extremes: he rejects both the view that (...)
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