Search results for 'Indeterminacy' (try it on Scholar)

897 found
Sort by:
  1. Referential Indeterminacy (1973). Robert Barrett. In Glenn Pearce & Patrick Maynard (eds.), Conceptual Change. Boston,D. Reidel. 52--222.score: 30.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ellipsis as Grammatical Indeterminacy (1973). Tim Shopen. Foundations of Language 10:65.score: 30.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Might All Normativity Be Queer, Metaphysical Indeterminacy & Time Travel (2010). Australasian Journal of Philosophy Contents of Volume 88. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (4).score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jerome C. Wakefield (2003). The Chinese Room Argument Reconsidered: Essentialism, Indeterminacy, and Strong AI. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 13 (2):285-319.score: 18.0
    I argue that John Searle's (1980) influential Chinese room argument (CRA) against computationalism and strong AI survives existing objections, including Block's (1998) internalized systems reply, Fodor's (1991b) deviant causal chain reply, and Hauser's (1997) unconscious content reply. However, a new ``essentialist'' reply I construct shows that the CRA as presented by Searle is an unsound argument that relies on a question-begging appeal to intuition. My diagnosis of the CRA relies on an interpretation of computationalism as a scientific theory about the (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Juan José Lara (2009). Underdetermination Vs. Indeterminacy. Daimon 47:219-228.score: 18.0
    Thomas Bonk has dedicated a book to analyzing the thesis of underdetermination of scientific theories, with a chapter exclusively devoted to the analysis of the relation between this idea and the indeterminacy of meaning. Both theses caused a revolution in the philosophic world in the sixties, generating a cascade of articles and doctoral theses. Agitation seems to have cooled down, but the point is still debated and it may be experiencing a renewed resurgence.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Peter Pagin (2008). Indeterminacy and the Analytic/Synthetic Distinctions: A Survey. Synthese 164 (1):1 - 18.score: 18.0
    It is often assumed that there is a close connection between Quine's criticism of the analytic/synthetic distinction, in 'Two dogmas of empiricism' and onwards, and his thesis of the indeterminacy of translation, in Word and Object and onwards. Often, the claim that the distinction is unsound (in some way or other) is taken to follow from the indeterminacy thesis, and sometimes the indeterminacy thesis is supported by such a claim. However, a careful scrutiny of the indeterminacy (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. James Stazicker (2011). Attention, Visual Consciousness and Indeterminacy. Mind and Language 26 (2):156-184.score: 18.0
    I propose a new argument showing that conscious vision sometimes depends constitutively on conscious attention. I criticise traditional arguments for this constitutive connection, on the basis that they fail adequately to dissociate evidence about visual consciousness from evidence about attention. On the same basis, I criticise Ned Block's recent counterargument that conscious vision is independent of one sort of attention (‘cognitive access'). Block appears to achieve the dissociation only because he underestimates the indeterminacy of visual consciousness. I then appeal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Timothy McCarthy (2002). Radical Interpretation and Indeterminacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    McCarthy develops a theory of radical interpretation--the project of characterizing from scratch the language and attitudes of an agent or population--and applies it to the problems of indeterminacy of interpretation first described by Quine. The major theme in McCarthy's study is that a relatively modest set of interpretive principles, properly applied, can serve to resolve the major indeterminacies of interpretation.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jessica M. Wilson (2013). A Determinable-Based Account of Metaphysical Indeterminacy. Inquiry 56 (4):359–385.score: 18.0
    Many phenomena appear to be indeterminate, including material macro-object boundaries, predicates or properties admitting of borderline cases, and certain open future claims. Here I provide an account of indeterminacy in metaphysical, rather than semantic or epistemic, terms. Previous such accounts have been "meta-level" accounts, taking metaphysical indeterminacy (MI) to involve its being indeterminate which of various determinate states of affairs obtain. On my alternative, "object-level" account, MI involves its being determinate (or just plain true) that an indeterminate (less (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael Caie (2012). Belief and Indeterminacy. Philosophical Review 121 (1):1-54.score: 18.0
    An attractive approach to the semantic paradoxes holds that cases of semantic pathology give rise to indeterminacy. What attitude should a rational agent have toward a proposition that it takes to be indeterminate in this sense? Orthodoxy holds that rationality requires that an agent disbelieve such a proposition. I argue that a rational agent should be such that it is indeterminate whether it believes the proposition in question. For rational agents, indeterminacy in the objects of their attitudes will (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jeffrey E. Foss (1992). Introduction to the Epistemology of the Brain: Indeterminacy, Micro-Specificity, Chaos, and Openness. Topoi 11 (1):45-57.score: 18.0
    Given that the mind is the brain, as materialists insist, those who would understand the mind must understand the brain. Assuming that arrays of neural firing frequencies are highly salient aspects of brain information processing (the vector functional account), four hurdles to an understanding of the brain are identified and inspected: indeterminacy, micro-specificity, chaos, and openness.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Arpy Khatchirian (2009). What is Wrong with the Indeterminacy of Language-Attribution? Philosophical Studies 146 (2):197 - 221.score: 18.0
    One might take the significance of Davidson’s indeterminacy thesis to be that the question as to which language we can take another to be speaking can only be settled relative to our choice of an acceptable theory for interpreting the speaker. This, in turn, could be taken to show that none of us is ever speaking a determinate language. I argue that this result is self-defeating and cannot avoid collapse into a troubling skepticism about meaning. I then offer a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Donna M. Summerfield & Pat A. Manfredi (1998). Indeterminacy in Recent Theories of Content. Minds and Machines 8 (2):181-202.score: 18.0
    Jerry Fodor has charged that Fred Dretske's account of content suffers from indeterminacy to the extent that we should reject it in favor of Fodor‘s own account. In this paper, we ask what the problem of indeterminacy really is; we distinguish a relatively minor problem we call ‘looseness of fit’ from a major problem of failing to show how to point to what is not there. We sketch Dretske's account of content and how it is supposed to solve (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Matti Eklund (2013). Metaphysical Vagueness and Metaphysical Indeterminacy. Metaphysica 14 (2):165-179.score: 18.0
    The topic of this paper is whether there is metaphysical vagueness. It is shown that it is important to distinguish between the general phenomenon of indeterminacy and the more narrow phenomenon of vagueness (the phenomenon that paradigmatically rears its head in sorites reasoning). Relatedly, it is important to distinguish between metaphysical indeterminacy and metaphysical vagueness. One can wish to allow metaphysical indeterminacy but rule out metaphysical vagueness. As is discussed in the paper, central argument against metaphysical vagueness, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Richard Montgomery (1996). The Indeterminacy of Color Vision. Synthese 106 (2):167-203.score: 18.0
    A critical survey of recent work on the ontological status of colors supports the conclusion that, while some accounts of color can plausibly be dismissed, no single account can yet be endorsed. Among the remaining options are certain forms of color realism according which familiar colors are instantiated by objects in our extra-cranial visual environment. Also still an option is color anti-realism, the view that familiar colors are, at best, biologically adaptive fictions, instantiated nowhere.I argue that there is simply no (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Mark Greene (2008). The Indeterminacy of Loss. Ethics 118 (4):633-658.score: 18.0
    Abstract: This paper argues that continua of both genetic and environmental manipulation give rise to cases in which it is indeterminate whether the non-identity problem arises. In clear non-identity cases, impersonal principles can underwrite intuitions of wrongdoing. In clear cases of ordinary personal harm, ordinary ethical thinking about personal compensation augments or supersedes impersonal considerations. Indeterminate cases raise a special problem because it is indeterminate whether personal ethical considerations apply. Might indeterminacy of identity preclude a determinate and ethically justified (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Lawrence B. Solum (1987). On the Indeterminacy Crisis: Critiquing Critical Dogma. University of Chicago Law Review 54:462.score: 18.0
    This essay investigates the indeterminacy thesis - roughly the claim that the content of authoritative legal materials (such as the texts of constitutions, statutes, cases, rules, and regulations) does not determine the outcome of particular legal disputes. The indeterminacy thesis can be formulated as either "strong" or weak." The strong version of the indeterminacy thesis is demonstrably false, but several weak versions of the thesis are true but lack the radical implications of strong indeterminacy.The strong (...) thesis is the claim that all cases are "hard" cases - or that in any case any conceivable result can be derived from existing legal doctrine. Strong indeterminacy does not hold if there are easy cases - cases in which some outcomes cannot be legally correct. For example, if it were the case that the first paragraph of this abstract did not slander Gore Vidal, then there would be at least one easy case, and strong indeterminacy would be false.Weak versions of the indeterminacy thesis include the claim that important cases are indeterminate, that the law does not necessarily determine outcomes, or that every case could become indeterminate if political conditions supported indeterminacy. These weaker claims may be true, but they lack the critical bite associated with strong indeterminacy.The essay also distinguishes between "determinacy," "indeterminacy," and "underdeterminacy." The law is "determinate" with respect ot a given case if and only if the set of results that can be squared with the legal materials contains only one member. The law is "indeterminate" with respect to a given case if and only if the set of results that can be squared with the legal materials is identical with the set of all imaginable results. The law is "underdeterminate" with respect to a given case if and only if the set of results that can be squared with the legal materials is a nonidentical subset of the set of all imaginable results.This article was first published in 1987, and some of the author's views have been revised in interim. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Harold W. Noonan (2013). In Defence of the Sensible Theory of Indeterminacy. Metaphysica 14 (2):239-252.score: 18.0
    Can the world itself be vague, so that rather than vagueness be a deficiency in our mode of describing the world, it is a necessary feature of any true description of it? Gareth Evans famously poses this question in his paper ‘Can There Be Vague Objects’ (Analysis 38(4):208, 1978). In his recent paper ‘Indeterminacy and Vagueness: Logic and Metaphysics’, Peter van Inwagen (2009) elaborates the account of vagueness and, in particular, in the case of sentences, consequent indeterminacy in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Johan E. Gustafsson (2013). Indeterminacy and the Small-Improvement Argument. Utilitas 25 (4):433–445.score: 18.0
    In this article, I argue that the small-improvement fails since some of the comparisons involved in the argument might be indeterminate. I defend this view from two objections by Ruth Chang, namely the argument from phenomenology and the argument from perplexity. There are some other objections to the small-improvement argument that also hinge on claims about indeterminacy. John Broome argues that alleged cases of value incomparability are merely examples of indeterminacy in the betterness relation. The main premise of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Otávio Bueno (2005). On the Referential Indeterminacy of Logical and Mathematical Concepts. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (1):65 - 79.score: 18.0
    Hartry Field has recently examined the question whether our logical and mathematical concepts are referentially indeterminate. In his view, (1) certain logical notions, such as second-order quantification, are indeterminate, but (2) important mathematical notions, such as the notion of finiteness, are not (they are determinate). In this paper, I assess Field's analysis, and argue that claims (1) and (2) turn out to be inconsistent. After all, given that the notion of finiteness can only be adequately characterized in pure secondorder logic, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Chien-Hsing Ho (2013). Ontic Indeterminacy and Paradoxical Language: A Philosophical Analysis of Sengzhao's Linguistic Thought. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):505-522.score: 18.0
    For Sengzhao 僧肇 (374−414 CE), a leading Sanlun 三論 philosopher of Chinese Buddhism, things in the world are ontologically indeterminate in that they are devoid of any determinate form or nature. In his view, we should understand and use words provisionally, so that they are not taken to connote the determinacy of their referents. To echo the notion of ontic indeterminacy and indicate the provisionality of language, his main work, the Zhaolun 肇論, abounds in paradoxical expressions. In this essay, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Dieter Freundlieb (1991). Epistemological Realism and the Indeterminacy of Meaning. Is Systematic Interpretation Possible? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 22 (2):245-261.score: 18.0
    Summary This paper tries to show how the irreducible indeterminacy of textual meanings can be reconciled with epistemological realism which normally presupposes independently existing but determinate objects of knowledge. E.D. Hirsch's project of objective interpretation, including his most recent attempts to show that meanings, in spite of their openness to future modifications, are historically determined objects of knowledge, is being criticized. The paper argues that his use of the semantics and the reference theories of Kripke, Putnam, and others forces (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Mireille Hildebrandt (2010). The Indeterminacy of an Emergency: Challenges to Criminal Jurisdiction in Constitutional Democracy. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):161-181.score: 18.0
    In this contribution I address the type of emergency that threatens a state’s monopoly of violence, meaning that the state’s competence to provide citizens with elementary security is challenged. The question is, whether actions taken by the state to ward off these threats (should) fall within the ambit of the criminal law. A central problem is the indeterminacy that is inherent in the state of emergency, implicating that adequate measures as well as constitutional constraints to be imposed on such (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Christopher T. Buford (2013). Does Indeterminacy Matter? Theoria 79 (2):155-166.score: 18.0
    Derek Parfit has offered numerous arguments in an attempt to establish that identity is not what matters. Jens Johannson has recently argued that Parfit's various arguments for the claim that identity is not what matters fail to establish what Parfit takes such arguments to establish. Johannson contends that this is due in part to the invalidity of one of Parfit's key arguments, and the fact that Parfit ignores a position that is compatible with the conclusions of his successful arguments and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Alon Chasid (2014). Visual Experience: Cognitive Penetrability and Indeterminacy. Acta Analytica 29 (1):119-130.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses a counterexample to the thesis that visual experience is cognitively impenetrable. My central claim is that sometimes visual experience is influenced by the perceiver’s beliefs, rendering her experience’s representational content indeterminate. After discussing other examples of cognitive penetrability, I focus on a certain kind of visual experience— that is, an experience that occurs under radically nonstandard conditions—and show that it may have indeterminate content, particularly with respect to low-level properties such as colors and shapes. I then explain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Chien-Hsing Ho, The Way of Nonacquisition: Jizang’s Philosophy of Ontic Indeterminacy.score: 18.0
    For Jizang (549−623), a prominent philosophical exponent of Chinese Madhyamaka, all things are empty of determinate form or nature. Given anything X, no linguistic item can truly and conclusively be applied to X in the sense of positing a determinate form or nature therein. This philosophy of ontic indeterminacy is connected closely with his notion of the Way (dao 道), which seems to indicate a kind of ineffable principle of reality. However, Jizang also equates the Way with nonacquisition as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Timothy A. Kenyon (2000). Indeterminacy and Realism. In Andrew Brook, Don Ross & David L. Thompson (eds.), Dennett's Philosophy: A Comprehensive Assessment. MIT Press. 77--94.score: 18.0
    This article considers a Quine-Dennett style of argument from the indeterminacy of intentional content against the reducibility of mental states to neurological states. The most compelling version of such an argument, I suggest, is one that exploits a semantic anti-realist notion of truth; this holds out the promise of a relatively sophisticated story about the respects in which mental state attributions may be true or false of physical systems, without those states themselves being physical states.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Serge Grigoriev (2010). MEANING AS HYPOTHESIS: QUINE's INDETERMINACY THESIS REVISITED. Dialogue: Canadian Review of Philosophy 49 (3):395-411.score: 18.0
    Despite offering many formulations of his controversial indeterminacy of translation thesis, Quine has never explored in detail the connection between indeterminacy and the conception of meaning that he supposedly derived from the work of Peirce and Duhem. The outline of such a conception of meaning, as well as its relationship to the indeterminacy thesis, is worked out in this paper; and its merits and implications are assessed both in the context of Quine’s own philosophical agenda, and also (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert Lane (2014). Peircean Semiotic Indeterminacy and Its Relevance for Biosemiotics. In Vinicius Romanini (ed.), Peirce and Biosemiotics.score: 18.0
    This chapter presents a detailed explanation of Peirce’s early and late views on semiotic indeterminacy and then considers how those views might be applied within biosemiotics. Peirce distinguished two different forms of semiotic indeterminacy: generality and vagueness. He defined each in terms of the “right” that indeterminate signs extend, either to their interpreters in the case of generality or to their utterers in the case of vagueness, to further determine their meaning. On Peirce’s view, no sign is absolutely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John R. Searle (1984). Indeterminacy, Empiricism, and the First Person. Journal of Philosophy 81 (March):123-146.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Matti Eklund (2004). Personal Identity, Concerns, and Indeterminacy. The Monist 87 (4):489-511.score: 15.0
    Let the moral question of personal identity be the following: what is the nature of the entities we should focus our prudential concerns and ascriptions of responsibility around? (If indeed we should structure these things around any entities at all.) Let the semantic question of personal identity be the question of what is the nature of the entities that ‘person’ is true of. A naive (in the sense of simple and intuitive) view would have it that the two questions are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Elizabeth Barnes (2009). Indeterminacy, Identity and Counterparts: Evans Reconsidered. Synthese 168 (1):81 - 96.score: 15.0
    In this paper I argue that Gareth Evans’ famous proof of the impossibility of de re indeterminate identity fails on a counterpart-theoretic interpretation of the determinacy operators. I attempt to motivate a counterpart-theoretic reading of the determinacy operators and then show that, understood counterpart-theoretically, Evans’ argument is straightforwardly invalid.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David Papineau (1998). Teleosemantics and Indeterminacy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (1):1-14.score: 15.0
    The aim of this paper is to defend the teleological theory of representation against an objection by Jerry Fodor. I shall argue that previous attempts to answer this objection fail to recognize the importance of belief-desire structure for the teleological theory of representation.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. H. G. Callaway (2003). The Esoteric Quine? Belief Attribution and the Significance of the Indeterminacy Thesis in Quine’s Kant Lectures. In , W.V. Quine, Wissenschaft und Empfindung. Frommann-Holzboog.score: 15.0
    This is the Introduction to my translation of Quine's Kant Lectures. Part of my interpretation is that an "esoteric doctrine" in involved in Quine's distinctive semantic claims: his skepticism of the credulity of non-expert evaluation of discourse and theory.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Justin Khoo (2013). Conditionals, Indeterminacy, and Triviality. Philosophical Perspectives 27 (1):260-287.score: 15.0
  36. Theo van Willigenburg (2000). Moral Compromises, Moral Integrity and the Indeterminacy of Value Rankings. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):385-404.score: 15.0
    Though the art of compromise, i.e. of settling differences by mutual concessions, is part of communal living on any level, we often think that there is something wrong in compromise, especially in cases where moral convictions are involved. A first reason for distrusting compromises on moral matters refers to the idea of integrity, understood in the basic sense of 'standing for something', especially standing for the values and causes that to some extent confer identity. The second reason points out the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Helen Morris Cartwright (1993). On Two Arguments for the Indeterminacy of Personal Identity. Synthese 95 (2):241-273.score: 15.0
    Both arguments are based on the breakdown of normal criteria of identity in certain science-fictional circumstances. In one case, normal criteria would support the identity of person A with each of two other persons, B and C; and it is argued that, in the imagined circumstances, A=B and A=C have no truth value. In the other, a series or spectrum of cases is tailored to a sorites argument. At one end of the spectrum, persons A and B are such that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Ingmar Persson (1992). The Indeterminacy and Insignificance of Personal Identity. Inquiry 35 (2):271 – 283.score: 15.0
  39. Alan Malachowski (1988). Searle on First Person Meaning and Indeterminacy. Theoria 54 (1):25-30.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Martin Gustafsson (2011). Seeing the Facts and Saying What You Like: Retroactive Redescription and Indeterminacy in the Past. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (3-4):296-327.score: 15.0
    In chapter 17 of his book, Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory , Ian Hacking makes the disquieting claim that “perhaps we should best think of past human actions as being to a certain extent indeterminate.” 1 Against what may appear like the self-evident conception of the past as fixed and unalterable, Hacking suggests that when it comes to human conduct and experience, there are reasons to adopt a more flexible view. This suggestion (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Karsten R. Stueber (1996). Indeterminacy and the First Person Perspective. In C. Martinez Vidal (ed.), Verdad: Logica, Representacion Y Mundo. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Robert Kirk (1993). Indeterminacy of Interpretation, Idealization, and Norms. Philosophical Studies 70 (2):213-223.score: 15.0
  43. P. William Bechtel (1978). Indeterminacy and Intentionality: Quine's Purported Elimination of Propositions. Journal of Philosophy 75 (November):649-661.score: 15.0
  44. Duncan MacIntosh (1989). Modality, Mechanism and Translational Indeterminacy. Dialogue 28 (03):391-.score: 15.0
    Ken Warmbrod thinks Quine agrees that translation is determinate if it is determinate what speakers would say in all possible circumstances; that what things would do in merely possible circumstances is determined by what their subvisible constituent mechanisms would dispose them to do on the evidence of what alike actual mechanisms make alike actual things do actually; and that what speakers say is determined by their neural mechanisms. Warmbrod infers that people's neural mechanisms make translation of what people say determinate. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jeff E. Malpas (1991). Holism and Indeterminacy. Dialectica 47 (1):47-58.score: 15.0
  46. David Davies (1995). Davidson, Indeterminacy, and Measurement. Acta Analytica 10 (14):37-56.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Junichi Murata (1999). The Indeterminacy of Images: An Approach to a Phenomenology of the Imagination. In Phenomenology: Japanese and American Perspectives. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 15.0
  48. Robert Pepperell (2011). Connecting Art and the Brain: An Artist's Perspective on Visual Indeterminacy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 15.0
  49. Paula Sweeney (forthcoming). Future Contingents, Indeterminacy and Context. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.score: 15.0
    In Facing the future, Belnap et al reject bivalence and propose double time reference semantics to give a pragmatic response to the following assertion problem: how can we make sense of assertions about future events made at a time when the outcomes of those events are not yet determined? MacFarlane (2003, 2008) employs the same semantics, now bolstered with a relative-truth predicate, to accommodate the following apparently conflicting intuitions regarding the truth-value of an uttered future contingent: at the moment of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Michael Tye (1993). Image Indeterminacy. In Naomi M. Eilan (ed.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell. 356--372.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 897