Search results for 'Indeterminacy of Translation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Panu Raatikainen (2005). On How to Avoid the Indeterminacy of Translation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):395-413.
    Quine’s thesis of the indeterminacy of translation has puzzled the philosophical community for several decades. It is unquestionably among the best known and most disputed theses in contemporary philosophy. Quine’s classical argument for the indeterminacy thesis, in his seminal work Word and Object, has even been described by Putnam as “what may well be the most fascinating and the most discussed philosophical argument since Kant’s Transcendental Deduction of the Categories” (Putnam, 1975a: p. 159).
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  2.  70
    Rogério Passos Severo (2014). Are There Empirical Cases of Indeterminacy of Translation? Grazer Philosophische Studien 89:131-148.
    Quine’s writings on indeterminacy of translation are mostly abstract and theoretical; his reasons for the thesis are not based on historical cases of translation but on general considerations about how language works. So it is no surprise that a common objection to the thesis asserts that it is not backed up by any positive empirical evidence. Ian Hacking (1981 and 2002) claims that whatever credibility the thesis does enjoy comes rather from alleged (fictitious) cases of radical mistranslation. (...)
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  3.  10
    Alan Weir (2006). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. OUP Oxford
    W.V. Quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of translation is the theory which launched a thousand doctorates. During the 1970s it sometimes seemed to be as firmly entrenched a dogma among North American philosophers as the existence of God was among medieval theologians. So what is the indeterminacy thesis? It is very tempting, of course, to apply a little reflexivity and deny that there is any determinate thesis of indeterminacy of translation; to charge Quine with championing (...)
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  4.  28
    Byeong-Uk Yi (2008). A New Case for Indeterminacy Of Translation. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 39:283-289.
    In this paper, I revisit W. V. Quine’s thesis of indeterminacy of translation. I think Quine’s arguments for the thesis are marred by his controversial assumptions about language that amount to a kind of linguistic behaviorism. I hope to cast a new light on the thesis by presenting a strong argument for the thesis that does not rest on those assumptions. The argument that I present in the paper results from adapting Benson Mates’s objection to Rudolph Carnap’s analysis (...)
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  5.  89
    Howard Sankey (1991). Incommensurability and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (2):219 – 223.
    In this paper it is argued that the concept of translation failure involved in Kuhn's thesis of incommensurability is distinct from that of translational indeterminacy in Quine's sense. At most, Kuhnian incommensurability constitutes a weak form of indeterminacy, quite distinct from Quine's. There remains, however, a convergence between the two views of translation, namely, that there is no single adequate translation between languages.
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  6. Dorit Bar-On (1993). Indeterminacy of Translation--Theory and Practice. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (4):781-810.
    To an ordinary translator, the idea that there are too many perfect translation schemes between any two languages would come as a surprise. Quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of translation expresses just this idea. It implies that most of the 'implicit canons' actual translators use in their assessment of translations lack objective status. My dissertation is an attempt to present a systematic challenge to Quine's view of language and to support the idea that one could develop an (...)
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  7.  63
    M. C. Bradley (1975). Kirk on Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 36 (1):18 - 22.
    R kirk ("analysis", volume 33, 1973, pages 195-201) proposes an argument against quine's deduction of indeterminacy of translation from underdetermination of physical theory. the present paper is a reply to kirk, aimed primarily at showing that his argument is "ignoratio elenchi".
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  8. Sophie R. Allen (2010). Can Theoretical Underdetermination Support the Indeterminacy of Translation? Revisiting Quine's 'Real Ground'. Philosophy 85 (1):67-90.
    It is commonly believed that Quine's principal argument for the Indeterminacy of Translation requires an untenably strong account of the underdetermination of theories by evidence, namely that that two theories may be compatible with all possible evidence for them and yet incompatible with each other. In this article, I argue that Quine's conclusion that translation is indeterminate can be based upon the weaker, uncontroversial conception of theoretical underdetermination, in conjunction with a weak reading of the 'Gavagai' argument (...)
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  9.  75
    Barry Stroud (1968). Conventionalism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Synthese 19 (1-2):82 - 96.
    Quine's arguments for the indeterminacy of translation demonstrate the existence and help to explain the rationale of restraints upon what we can say and understand. In particular they show that there are logical truths to which there are no intelligible alternatives. Thus the standard view that the truths of logic and mathematics differ from "synthetic" statements in being true solely by virtue of linguistic convention--Which requires for its plausibility the existence of intelligible alternatives to our present logical truth--Is (...)
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  10.  41
    Donald Hockney (1975). The Bifurcation of Scientific Theories and Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophy of Science 42 (4):411-427.
    In this essay I present a statement of Quine's indeterminacy thesis in its general form. It is shown that the thesis is not about difficulties peculiar to so-called "radical translation." It is a general thesis about meaning and reference with important consequences for any theory of our theories and beliefs. It is claimed that the thesis is inconsistent with Quine's realism, his doctrine of the relativity of reference, and that the argument for the thesis has the consequence that (...)
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  11.  37
    Michael E. Levin (1979). Forcing and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Erkenntnis 14 (1):25 - 32.
    Quine's arguments for the indeterminacy of translation rest on behaviorist presuppositions [AL 1/29/2004].
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  12.  35
    Alison Jaggar (1973). On One of the Reasons for the Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (2):257-265.
    Quine's claim for the unavoidable indeterminacy of translation is partially supported by an argument based on the premise that the analytical hypotheses of the translator are underdetermined by the behavioural evidence on the strength of which they are asserted. I make three points about this argument. First, I show that quine's treatment of analytical hypotheses is inconsistent with his treatment of the hypotheses of physical science. Secondly, I argue that, Since no reason for this difference in treatment is (...)
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  13.  9
    Christopher R. Hitchcock (1992). Discussion: Massey and Kirk on the Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:215-223.
    Gerald Massey has constructed translation manuals for the purposes of illustrating Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis. Robert Kirk has argued that Massey’s manuals do not live up to their billing. In this note, I will present Massey’s manuals and defend them against Kirk’s objections. The implications for Quine’s Indeterminacy Thesis will then be briefly discussed.
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  14. Eve Gaudet (2003). The Asymmetry Between Quine's Indeterminacy of Translation Thesis and Underdetermination of Theory. Dissertation, Washington University
    This dissertation intends to contribute to the discussion about the asymmetry W. V. Quine sees between indeterminacy of translation and underdetermination of theory. Quine often formulates the asymmetry by saying that there is a fact of the matter to physics but none to translation. The first chapters of the dissertation constitute an attempt of clarification of that notion of fact of the matter. They contain an analysis of the relations between Quine's notion of fact of the matter, (...)
     
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  15. Howard Darmstadter (1974). Indeterminacy of Translation and Indeterminacy of Belief. Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):229 - 237.
    I argue that quine's thesis of the indeterminacy of radical translation is incorrect. the argument exploits the connections between quine's thesis and common sense notions regarding belief. a simple model of belief, taking beliefs to be sets of brain states, is used to give a rigorous restatement of quine's thesis. it is then argued that our need to project the actions of other people from their professions of belief would make the situation quine describes unstable, since persons in (...)
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  16.  83
    R. Kirk (1973). Underdetermination of Theory and Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 33 (6):195 - 201.
    Quine has attempted to support his indeterminacy thesis by invoking the assumption that two different physical theories could both be compatible with all possible data. His argument ought to work even if the translation of non-Theoretical sentences is determinate. But this enables us to see that the underdetermination of theory need not produce any indeterminacy in the translation of theory.
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  17.  83
    H. G. Callaway (2006). Review of Eve Gaudet, Quine on Meaning: The Indeterminacy of Translation. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
    The book contains twelve chapters, prefaced by acknowledg­ments, and followed by a short index. It derives from the author's doctoral dissertation in philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis, and thanks are offered to committee members Robert B. Barrett, Joseph Ullian and Roger Gibson. The reader who is not inclined to review the large related literature on Quine's view of cognitive meaning and translation may also be attracted to this book for concise summaries and treatment of the Quinean view (...)
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  18.  82
    Scott Soames (1999). The Indeterminacy of Translation and the Inscrutability of Reference. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):321-370.
    Quine's argument for indeterminacy and inscrutability equivocates about what it is for one set of truths to determine another. In addition to being unsupported, these doctrines lead Quine to reject our ordinary notions of meaning, truth, and reference in favor of certain replacement notions, including stimulus meaning, and disquotational, or Tarski, truth and reference for one's own present language. This is self-defeating. To formulate the doctrines of physicalism, underdetermination, indeterminacy, and inscrutability, one must refer to the totality of (...)
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  19.  84
    Markus Werning (2004). Compositionality, Context, Categories and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Erkenntnis 60 (2):145-178.
    The doctrine that meanings are entitieswith a determinate and independent reality is often believed tohave been undermined by Quine's thought experiment of radicaltranslation, which results in an argument for the indeterminacy oftranslation. This paper argues to the contrary. Starting fromQuine's assumption that the meanings of observation sentences arestimulus meanings, i.e., set-theoretical constructions of neuronalstates uniquely determined by inter-subjectively observable facts,the paper shows that this meaning assignment, up to isomorphism,is uniquely extendable to all expressions that occur inobservation sentences. To do (...)
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  20.  35
    Peter Smith (1975). Kirk on Quine's Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Philosophical Studies 27 (6):427 - 431.
    An argument given by kirk ("analysis" 33.6) against quine's 1970 defense of his indeterminacy thesis is discussed. It is shown that kirk's claim that quine's argument is self-Defeating is unacceptable.
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  21. W. V. Quine (1970). On the Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophy 67 (6):178-183.
  22. W. V. Quine (1987). Indeterminacy of Translation Again. Journal of Philosophy 84 (1):5-10.
  23.  3
    Gary L. Hardcastle (1991). Presentism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 22 (2):321-345.
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  24.  33
    Karl Schick (1972). Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophy 64 (22):818-832.
  25.  35
    B. M. Humphries (1970). Indeterminacy of Translation and Theory. Journal of Philosophy 67 (6):167-178.
  26.  28
    Edward S. Shirley (1971). Stimulus Meaning and Indeterminacy of Translation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):417-422.
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  27.  24
    James F. Harris (1976). Indeterminacy of Translation and Analyticity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):239-243.
  28.  3
    Lorenzo Peña (1988). Indeterminacy of Translation as Hermeneutic Doctrine. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 62:212-224.
  29.  4
    Robert Sinclair (2011). Quine on the Indeterminacy of Translation. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
  30. Edited & Introductions by Dagfinn Føllesdal (2000). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Dagfinn Føllesdal (ed.), Philosophy of Quine. Garland Pub.
     
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  31. Karl Schick (1972). Indeterminacy of Translation. Journal of Philosophy 69 (22):818.
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  32. Scott Soames (2004). CHAPTER 10. The Indeterminacy of Translation. In Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century, Volume 2: The Age of Meaning. Princeton University Press 223-258.
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  33. Michael Friedman (1975). Physicalism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Noûs 9 (4):353-374.
  34. Robert Kirk (2004). Indeterminacy of Translation. In Roger F. Gibson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Quine. Cambridge University Press 151--180.
     
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  35. Richard Rorty (1972). Indeterminacy of Translation and of Truth. Synthese 23 (4):443 - 462.
  36. M. C. Bradley (1980). More on Mind-Body Problem and Indeterminacy of Translation. Mind 89 (354):261-262.
  37.  9
    Dagfinn Foellesdal (1973). Indeterminacy of Translation and Under‐Determination of the Theory of Nature. Dialectica 27 (3‐4):289-301.
  38.  71
    Robert Kirk (1977). More on Quine's Reasons for Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 37 (3):136 - 141.
  39.  87
    Peter Hylton (1982). Analyticity and the Indeterminacy of Translation. Synthese 52 (2):167 - 184.
  40.  30
    Gerald J. Massey (1992). The Indeterminacy of Translation: A Study in Philosophical Exegesis. Philosophical Topics 20 (1):317-345.
  41.  27
    Stephen White (2012). The Indeterminacy of Translation: Fifty Years Later. Disputatio 4 (32):385 - 393.
  42.  33
    Robert Kirk (1985). Davidson and Indeterminacy of Translation. Analysis 45 (1):20 - 24.
  43.  48
    M. C. Bradley (1977). Mind-Body Problem and Indeterminacy of Translation. Mind 86 (343):345-367.
  44.  29
    Christian List, Indeterminacy of Translation Reassessed: Is the Problem of Translation an Empirical Matter?
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  45.  30
    Nancy Tuana (1981). Taking the Indeterminacy of Translation One Step Further. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):283 - 291.
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  46.  3
    Gabriel Segal (2000). Four Arguments for the Indeterminacy of Translation. In A. Orenstein & Petr Kotatko (eds.), Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine. Kluwer Academic Print on Demand 131--139.
  47.  2
    Michael Friedman (1995). 11 Physicalism and the Indeterminacy of Translation. In Paul K. Moser & J. D. Trout (eds.), Contemporary Materialism: A Reader. Routledge 209.
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  48.  2
    Norbert Hornstein (1982). Foundationalism and Quine's Indeterminacy of Translation Thesis. Social Research 49.
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  49. V. Cernik & J. Vicenik (1995). Correspondence, Incommensurability, Indeterminacy of Translation, and Understanding. Filozofia 50 (7):329-342.
     
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  50. Georg Meggle, Kuno Lorenz, Dietfried Gerhardus & Marcelo Dascal (1995). The dispute on the indeterminacy of translation. In Georg Meggle, Kuno Lorenz, Dietfried Gerhardus & Marcelo Dascal (eds.), Sprachphilosophie: Ein Internationales Handbuch Zeitgenössischer Forschung. Walter de Gruyter
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