Search results for 'Indian' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    West Indian & Cohn Bertram (1958). West Indian Immigration. Eugenics Review 50 (3):6.
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  2. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2008). Dana: A Foundation of the Indian Social Life. In Sebastian Vt & Geeta Manakatala (eds.), Foundations of Indian Life: Cultural, Religious and Aesthetic Edited by ISBN. 1439201854. Booksurge
    This paper discusses the concept of Dána or charity as the foundation of Indian Social life. Dána has been in vogue in India since the Vedic times, but it was codified by the smritis which prescribe do’s and don’ts of the life of the individual. Limiting its scope to Yagnavalkya smriti the paper analyses the significance of Dána as a regulative principle of accumulation of wealth.
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  3.  84
    Shayne Clarke (2009). Locating Humour in Indian Buddhist Monastic Law Codes: A Comparative Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):311-330.
    It has been claimed that Indian Buddhism, as opposed to East Asian Chan/Zen traditions, was somehow against humour. In this paper I contend that humour is discernible in canonical Indian Buddhist texts, particularly in Indian Buddhist monastic law codes (Vinaya). I will attempt to establish that what we find in these texts sometimes is not only humourous but that it is intentionally so. I approach this topic by comparing different versions of the same narratives preserved in (...) Buddhist monastic law codes. (shrink)
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  4.  38
    Jonathan A. Silk (2007). Good and Evil in Indian Buddhism: The Five Sins of Immediate Retribution. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (3):253-286.
    Indian Buddhist sources speak of five sins of immediate retribution: murder of mother, father, an arhat, drawing the blood of a buddha, and creating a schism in the monastic community. This category provides the paradigm for sinfulness in Buddhism. Yet even these sins can and will, be expiated in the long run, demonstrating the overwhelmingly positive nature of Buddhist ethics.
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  5.  44
    Claus Oetke (2009). Some Issues of Scholarly Exegesis (in Indian Philosophy). Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (5):415-497.
    The article deals with some facets of the phenomenon of the underdetermination of meaning by (linguistic) data which are particularly relevant for textual exegesis in the historico-philological disciplines. The paper attempts to demonstrate that lack of relevant information is by no means the only important reason why certain issues of interpretation cannot be definitely settled by means of traditional philological methods but that the objective nonexistence of pertinent data is equally significant. It is claimed that the phenomenon of objective under-determination (...)
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  6.  1
    Angelika Malinar (forthcoming). Philosophy in the Mahābhārata and the History of Indian Philosophy. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-21.
    The study of philosophical terms and doctrines in the Mahābhārata touches not only on important aspects of the contents, composition and the historical contexts of the epic, but also on the historiography of Indian philosophy. General ideas about the textual history of the epic and the distinction between “didactic” and “narrative” parts have influenced the study of epic philosophy no less than academic discussions about what is philosophy in India and how it developed. This results in different evaluations of (...)
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  7.  7
    Eviatar Shulman (2012). Language, Understanding and Reality: A Study of Their Relation in a Foundational Indian Metaphysical Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (3):339-369.
    This paper engages with Johaness Bronkhorst’s recognition of a “correspondence principle” as an underlying assumption of Nāgārjuna’s thought. Bronkhorst believes that this assumption was shared by most Indian thinkers of Nāgārjuna’s day, and that it stimulated a broad and fascinating attempt to cope with Nāgārjuna’s arguments so that the principle of correspondence may be maintained in light of his forceful critique of reality. For Bronkhorst, the principle refers to the relation between the words of a sentence and the realities (...)
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  8. Jan Westerhoff (2012). Self, No Self? Perspectives From Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):812-815.
    Amongst its many other merits this collection of essays demonstrates the growing maturity of the study of the Indian philosophical tradition. Much of the good scholarship done on non-Western, and in particular on Indian philosophy over the last decades has attempted to show that these texts hailing from east of Suez contain interesting and sophisticated discussions in their own right, discussions that have to be understood against the Ancient Indian intellectual and cultural context rather than evaluated by (...)
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  9. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Richness of Indian Symbolism and Changing Perspectives. In Paata Chkheidze, Hoang Thi To & Yaroslav Pasko (eds.), Symbols in Cultures and Identities in a Time of Global Interaction.
    My aim in this paper is to explicate the diversity of Indian Symbolism and to show the changing patterns of symbols. The first part is mostly descriptive and interpretative and tries to bring out the different forms of Indian Symbolism. The second part tries to bring out the different kinds of changes that are possible with regard to symbols.
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  10. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Jyotiba Phule : A Modern Indian Philosopher. Darshan: International Refereed Quarterly Research Journal for Philosophy and Yoga 1 (3-4):28-36.
    JOTIRAO GOVINDRAO PHULE occupies a unique position among the social reformers of Maharashtra in the nineteenth century. While other reformers concentrated more on reforming the social institutions of family and marriage with special emphasis on the status and right of women, Jotirao Phule revolted against the unjust caste system under which millions of people had suffered for centuries and developed a critique of Indian social order and Hinduism. During this period, number of social and political thinkers started movement against (...)
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  11. Desh Raj Sirswal (2014). Swami Vivekananda , Indian Youth and Value Education. In Atanu Mohapatra (ed.), Vivekananda and Contemporary Education in India: Recent Perspectives. Surendra Publications 167-180.
    Swami Vivekananda is considered as one of the most influential spiritual educationist and thinker of India. He was disciple of Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and the founder of Ramakrishna Math and Ramakrishna Mission. He is considered by many as an icon for his fearless courage, his positive exhortations to the youth, his broad outlook to social problems, and countless lectures and discourses on Vedanta philosophy. For him, “Education is not the amount of information that is put into your brain and runs riots (...)
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  12. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2012). Review of Indian Philosophy in English. Philosophical Papers:206-212.
    The present work is an attempt to show that ‘important and original philosophy was written in English, in India, by Indians’ from the late 19th c through the middle of 20th c. (xiv). In fact, it tells us that these works ‘sustained the Indian philosophical tradition and were creators of its modern avatar.’ (xiv) The authors of these works ‘pursued Indian philosophy in a language and format that could render it both accessible and acceptable to the Anglophone world (...)
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  13. Vivek Dhareshwar (2012). Framing the Predicament of Indian Thought: Gandhi, theGita,and Ethical Action. Asian Philosophy 22 (3):257-274.
    Although there is such a thing as Indian thought, it seems to play no role in the way social sciences and philosophy are practiced in India or elsewhere. The problem is not only that we no longer employ terms such as atman, avidya, dharma to reflect on our experience; the terms that we do indeed use—sovereignty, secularism, rights, civil society and political society, corruption—seem to insulate our experience from our reflection. This paper will outline Gandhi’s framing of our predicament (...)
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  14.  8
    Anindita Niyogi Balslev (2015). “Science–Religion Samvada” and the Indian Cultural Heritage. Zygon 50 (4):877-892.
    This article seeks to delineate some of the fundamental philosophical traits that are special characteristics of the Indian cultural soil. Tracing these from the Vedic period, it is shown that this heritage is still alive and gives a distinctive flavor to the science–religion dialogue in the Indian context. The prevalent attitude is not to view science and religion as antagonistic, but rather as forces that together could create a world where the persistent epistemological and ethical problems can get (...)
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  15.  13
    Desh Raj Sirswal, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar: A Modern Indian Philosopher.
    Dr. B.R. Ambedkar is one of the names that changed social order of the age-old tradition of suppression and humiliation. He was an intellectual, scholar & statesman and contributed greatly in the nation building. He led a number of movements to emancipate the downtrodden masses and to secure human rights to millions of depressed classes. He has left an indelible imprint through his immense contribution in framing the modern Constitution of free India. He stands as a symbol of struggle for (...)
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  16.  92
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report.
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, September 21st to 22nd, 2013: 1. How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates? 2. How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so? 3. Can meditation give us moral knowledge? 4. What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world? 5. (...)
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  17.  85
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Four.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: What can Indian philosophy tell us about how we perceive the world?
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  18.  46
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as belonging (...)
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  19.  75
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Two.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: How can we train our attention, and what are the benefits of doing so?
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  20.  58
    Rajesh Kasturirangan, Nirmalya Guha & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in the (...) philosophical notion of valid cognition . Methodologically, our paper is an attempt at cross-cultural philosophy and cognitive science; ontologically, it is an attempt at marrying the phenomenal and the formal. (shrink)
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  21.  50
    Kevin Connolly, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Five.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: Are there cross-cultural philosophical themes?
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  22.  48
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question Three.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This portion of the report explores the question: Can meditation give us moral knowledge?
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  23.  47
    Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving & Lu Teng, Mind and Attention in Indian Philosophy: Workshop Report, Question One.
    This is an excerpt from a report on the workshop on mind and attention in Indian philosophy at Harvard University, on September 21st and 22nd, 2013, written by Kevin Connolly, Jennifer Corns, Nilanjan Das, Zachary Irving, and Lu Teng, and available at http://networksensoryresearch.utoronto.ca/Events_%26_Discussion.html This part of the report explores the question: How does the understanding of attention in Indian philosophy bear on contemporary western debates?
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  24.  27
    Michael Lewis (2005). Indian Science for Indian Tigers?: Conservation Biology and the Question of Cultural Values. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):185 - 207.
    The implementation of Project Tiger in India, 1973-1974, was justly hailed as a triumph of international environmental advocacy. It occurred as a growing number of conservation-oriented biologists were beginning to argue forcefully for scientifically managed conservation of species and ecosystems -- the same scientists who would, by the mid-1980s, call themselves conservation biologists. Although India accepted international funds to implement Project Tiger, it strictly limited research posts to Government of India Foresters, against the protests of Indian and US biologists (...)
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  25.  8
    Elisa Freschi (2015). The Reuse of Texts in Indian Philosophy: Introduction. Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (2-3):85-108.
    The study of textual reuse is of fundamental importance in reconstructing lost or partially lost texts, passages of which can be partly recovered through other texts in which they have been embedded. Furthermore, the study of textual reuse also provides one with a deeper understanding of the modalities of the production of texts out of previous textual materials. Finally, it constitutes a unique chance to reconsider the historicity of concepts such as “author”, “originality” and “plagiarism”, which do not denote really (...)
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  26.  30
    Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2011). Indian Cognitivism and the Phenomenology of Conceptualization. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (2):277-296.
    We perform conceptual acts throughout our daily lives; we are always judging others, guessing their intentions, agreeing or opposing their views and so on. These conceptual acts have phenomenological as well as formal richness. This paper attempts to correct the imbalance between the phenomenal and formal approaches to conceptualization by claiming that we need to shift from the usual dichotomies of cognitive science and epistemology such as the formal/empirical and the rationalist/empiricist divides—to a view of conceptualization grounded in the (...) philosophical notion of “valid cognition”. Methodologically, our paper is an attempt at cross-cultural philosophy and cognitive science; ontologically, it is an attempt at marrying the phenomenal and the formal. (shrink)
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  27.  5
    Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (Motilal Banarsidass 2007). Regretfully, it is not an uncommon view in orthodox Indology that Indian philosophers were not interested in ethics. This claim belies the fact that Indian philosophical schools were generally interested in the practical consequences of beliefs and actions. The most popular symptom of this concern is the doctrine of karma, according to which the consequences of actions have an evaluative valence. Ethics and the History of Indian (...)
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  28.  34
    Sasheej Hegde (2008). Ethical Specificities: Repositioning Indian Ethics. Sophia 47 (2):243-249.
    The essay is a review discussion of Indian Ethics in the context of a recent volume of essays. The attempt is to identify some of the issues that are now on the frontier of Indian ethics or that are likely to appear on that frontier in the coming years.
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  29.  24
    Marzenna Jakubczak (2005). Yoga: The Indian Tradition (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (2):353-358.
                      Book review: Yoga: The Indian Tradition. Edited by Ian Whicher and David Carpenter. London: RoutledgeCurzon, 2003, Pp. xii + 206     -/-  .
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  30.  15
    Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six (...)
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  31.  17
    Ulrich Mohrhoff (2008). Indian Psychology's Coming of Age. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (5):121-126.
    Report on the National Seminar on Indian Psychology, Bangalore, December 2007, jointly organized by the Indian Council of Philosophical Research and the Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana.
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  32.  8
    Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2008-09). The Argumentative Tradition in Indian Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy, Culture and Traditions 5:173-186.
    A spirit of disintegration and disunity is conspicuous on the contemporary social, as well as philosophical scene. There is a celebration of fragments and differences. In such a scenario, no less than a person like Amartya Sen, an eminent economist and a Noble Laureate rose to the occasion and traced out the roots and the space for a democratic discourse that has been sustained in the Indian philosophical tradition. It is laudable that he opened up a discussion that will (...)
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  33. Felipe Castañeda (2011). The image of the Indian and the conqueror in the Nueva Granada: The case of Bernardo de Vargas Machuca. [Spanish]. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 4:40-59.
    En sus Apologías y discursos de las conquistas occidentales, Bernardo de Vargas Machuca, apoyándose en Juan Ginés de Sepúlveda, pretende justificar el dominio español americano. En sus planteamientos es posible constatar un cambio de la noción de bárbaro, que se puede interpretar como una ampliación del concepto de siervo por naturaleza, a partir de la caracterización del indio como alguien ya sometido pero que, de una u otra manera, trata de resistirse a un dominio impuesto y no querido. Así, las (...)
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  34. Antony Kalliath & Jacob Parappally (2010). Indian Secularism Threatened! A Christian Response. Journal of Dharma 35 (2):171-182.
    Indian Secularism is different from the understanding of Secularism in the West. In India the concept of secularism is understood not as a separation of State and Religion but the recognition, protection and support of all religions by the State without any discrimination. Though Hinduism is the religion of about 80% Indians it is not a State religion. In the recent past some Hindu fundamentalist groups are trying to destroy the pluralist culture and multi-religious ethos of India by using (...)
     
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  35.  4
    Thomas M. Norton-Smith (2010). The Dance of Person and Place: One Interpretation of American Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    Common themes in American Indian philosophy -- First introductions -- Common themes : a first look -- Constructing an actual American Indian world -- NelsonGoodman's constructivism -- Setting the stage -- Fact, fiction, and feeders -- Ontological pluralism -- True versions and well-made worlds -- Nonlinguistic versions and the advancement of understanding -- True versions and cultural bias -- Constructive realism : variations on a theme by Goodman -- True versions and cultural bias -- An American Indian (...)
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  36.  24
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2013). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Contemporary Indian Philosophy is related to contemporary Indian thinkers and contains the proceedings of First Session of Society for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (SPPIS) Haryana. It is neither easy nor impossible to translate into action all noble goals set forth by the eminent thinkers and scholars, but we might try to discuss and propagate their ideas. In this session all papers submitted electronically and selected abstracts have been published on a website especially develop for this session. In (...)
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  37.  47
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2016). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The 150th Birth Anniversary of Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902) will be celebrated all over the world during this year. The year long world-wide celebration of 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda was formally inaugurated by the President of India at Swamiji's Ancestral House on 18th January, 2013. His short speech was very inspiring, he made a significant remark after quoting the great historian A.L.Basham , “Swami Vivekananda was very relevant during his times, is more relevant now and will remain relevant as (...)
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  38. Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2013). Ideological Crisis in Indian Society. Centre for Studies in Educational, Social and Cultural Development (CSESCD), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The Milestone Education Society (Regd.) Pehowa (Kurukshetra) working since 2005 in the field of school education, social work and higher education through its research initiatives. It started Center for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS) in 2010 and contributing continuously in the field of higher education through research journals, various programmes, and published books. -/- The present initiative Centre for Studies in Educational, Social and Cultural Development (CSESCD) will work on the issues related to downtrodden people though its various activity (...)
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  39.  39
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2011). Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Recent years have seen the beginning of a radical reassessment of the philosophical literature of ancient and classical India. The analytical techniques of contemporary philosophy are being deployed towards a fresh and original interpretation of the texts. This rational rather than mystical approach towards Indian philosophical theories has resulted in a need to work which explains afresh its central methods, courses and devices. It is with this spirit of thought and background that I want to publish a book to (...)
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  40. Anne Waters (ed.) (2004). American Indian Thought: Philosophical Essays. Blackwell (Oxford).
    This book brings together a diverse group of American Indian thinkers to discuss traditional and contemporary philosophies and philosophical issues. The essays presented here address philosophical questions pertaining to knowledge, time, place, history, science, law, religion, nationhood, ethics, and art, as understood from a variety of Native American standpoints. Unique in its approach, this volume represents several different tribes and nations and amplifies the voice of contemporary American Indian culture struggling for respect and autonomy. Taken together, the essays (...)
     
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  41. Arindam Chakrabarti (2011). Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (1):23-35.
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  42.  53
    Marzenna Jakubczak (2014). The Purpose of Non-Theistic Devotion in the Classical Indian Tradition of Sāṃkhya–Yoga. Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 4 (1):55-68.
    The paper starts with some textual distinctions concerning the concept of God in the metaphysical framework of two classical schools of Hindu philosophy, Sāṃkhya and Yoga. Then the author focuses on the functional and pedagogical aspects of prayer as well as practical justification of “religious meditation” in both philosophical schools. A special attention is put on the practice called īśvarapraṇidhāna, recommended in Yoga school, which is interpreted by the author as a form of non-theistic devotion. The meaning of the central (...)
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  43.  24
    Karen Pechilis (2006). Introduction: Bodily Transformations Across Indian Religions. [REVIEW] International Journal of Hindu Studies 10 (2):169-172.
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  44.  3
    Hemalatha Ganapathy‐Coleman (2013). Raising “Authentic” Indian Children in the United States: Dynamism in the Ethnotheories of Immigrant Hindu Parents. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 41 (4):360-386.
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  45.  41
    Shayne Clarke (2009). Monks Who Have Sex: Pārājika Penance in Indian Buddhist Monasticisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (1):1-43.
    In the study of Buddhism it is commonly accepted that a monk or nun who commits a pārājika offence is permanently and irrevocably expelled from the Buddhist monastic order. This view is based primarily on readings of the Pāli Vinaya. With the exception of the Pāli Vinaya, however, all other extant Buddhist monastic law codes (Dharmaguptaka, Mahāsāṅghika, Mahīśāsaka, Sarvāstivāda and Mūlasarvāstivāda) contain detailed provisions for monks and nuns who commit pārājikas but nevertheless wish to remain within the saṅgha. These monastics (...)
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  46.  68
    Jonardon Ganeri (2008). Contextualism in the Study of Indian Intellectual Cultures. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (5-6):551-562.
    When J. L. Austin introduced two “shining new tools to crack the crib of reality”—the theory of performative utterances and the doctrine of infelicities—he could not have imagined that he was also about to inaugurate a shining new industry in the philosophy of the social sciences. But with its evident concern for the features to which “all acts are heir which have the general character of ritual or ceremonial,” Austin’s theory soon became indispensable in the analysis of ritual, linguistic and (...)
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  47.  19
    Jeson Woo (2009). Gradual and Sudden Enlightenment: The Attainment of Yogipratyakṣa in the Later Indian Yogācāra School. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (2):179-188.
    In the later Indian Yogācāra school, yogipratyakṣa, the cognition of yogins is a key concept used to explain the Buddhist goal of enlightenment. It arises through the practice of meditation upon the Four Noble Truths. The method of the practice is to contemplate their aspects with attention (sādara), without interruption (nairantarya), and over a long period of time (dīrghakāla). A problem occurs in this position since Buddhists hold the theory of momentariness: how is possible that a yogin attains yogipratyakṣa (...)
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    Sourabh Singh (2012). Unraveling the Enigma of Indira Gandhi's Rise in Indian Politics: A Woman Leader's Quest for Political Legitimacy. Theory and Society 41 (5):479-504.
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  49. J. Donald Hughes (1983). American Indian Ecology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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    Zubin R. Mulla & Venkat R. Krishnan (2014). Karma-Yoga: The Indian Model of Moral Development. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):339-351.
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