Search results for 'Indian Philosophy, Orthodox and Heterodox Schools' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 1347.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually (...)
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  2. Rudrakanta Mishra (1992). Theory of Creation in Main Orthodox Schools of Indian Philosophy. Tirabhukti Publications (J).score: 614.4
     
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  3. Shyam Ranganathan (2007). Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 460.8
    Ethics and the History of Indian Philosophy (Motilal Banarsidass 2007). Regretfully, it is not an uncommon view in orthodox Indology that Indian philosophers were not interested in ethics. This claim belies the fact that Indian philosophical schools were generally interested in the practical consequences of beliefs and actions. The most popular symptom of this concern is the doctrine of karma, according to which the consequences of actions have an evaluative valence. Ethics and the History of (...)
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  4. Pradip Kumar Mazumdar (1977). The Philosophy of Language in the Light of Pāṇinian and the Mīmāṁsaka Schools of Indian Philosophy. Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar.score: 271.8
     
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  5. Rewati Raman Pandey (1978). Man and the Universe in the Orthodox Systems of Indian Philosophy. Gdk Publications.score: 271.8
     
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  6. Sue Hamilton (2001). Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 221.4
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millenia and encompassing several major religious traditions. Now, in this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian (...)
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  7. Bina Gupta (2011). An Introduction to Indian Philosophy: Perspectives on Reality, Knowledge, and Freedom. Routledge.score: 221.4
    An Introduction to Indian Philosophy offers a profound yet accessible survey of the development of India’s philosophical tradition. Beginning with the formation of Brahmanical, Jaina, Materialist, and Buddhist traditions, Bina Gupta guides the reader through the classical schools of Indian thought, culminating in a look at how these traditions inform Indian philosophy and society in modern times. Offering translations from source texts and clear explanations of philosophical terms, this text provides a rigorous overview of Indian (...)
     
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  8. Daya Krishna (1991). Indian Philosophy: A Counter Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 221.4
    Most writings on Indian philosophy assume that its central concern is with moska, that the Vedas along with the Upanishadic texts are at its root and that it consists of six orthodox systems knowns as Mimamasa, Vedanta, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Samkhya, and Yoga, on the one hand and three unorthodox systems: Buddhism, Jainism and Carvaka, on the other. Besides these, they accept generally the theory of Karma and the theory of Purusartha as parts of what the Indian tradition (...)
     
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  9. Shyam Ranganathan, Ramanuja. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 216.0
    Rāmānuja (ācārya), the eleventh century South Indian philosopher, is the chief proponent of Vishishtādvaita, which is one of the three main forms of the Orthodox Hindu philosophical school, Vedānta. As the prime philosopher of the Vishishtādvaita tradition, Rāmānuja is one of the Indian philosophical tradition’s most important and influential figures. He was the first Indian philosopher to provide a systematic theistic interpretation of the philosophy of the Vedas, and is famous for arguing for the epistemic and (...)
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  10. Matthew R. Dasti (forthcoming). Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy. In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism from Antiquity to the Present.score: 203.4
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the attitudes (...)
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  11. Sthaneshwar Timalsina (2009). Consciousness in Indian Philosophy: The Advaita Doctrine of 'Awareness Only'. Routledge.score: 203.4
    This book focuses on the analysis of pure consciousness as found in Advaita Vedanta, one of the main schools of Indian philosophy.
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  12. Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.) (2014). Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 203.4
    If one were to make a list of the leading topics of debate in classical Indian philosophy, contenders might include the existence and nature of the self; the fundamental sources of knowledge; the nature of the engagement between consciousness and reality; the existence and nature of God/Brahman; the proper account of causation; the relationship between language and the world; the practices that best ensure future happiness; the most expedient method for any soteriological attainment (or not); or the fundamental constituents (...)
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  13. Erich Frauwallner (1974). History of Indian Philosophy. New York,Humanities Press.score: 172.8
    v. 1. The philosophy of the Veda and of the epic.--The Buddha and the Jina.--The Sāmkhya and the classical Yoga-system.--v. 2. The Nature-philosophical schools and the Vaiśeṣika system.--The system of the Jaina.--The materialism.
     
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  14. A. Raghuramaraju (2009). Enduring Colonialism: Classical Presences and Modern Absences in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 172.8
    This volume explores three significant issues - absence, the consciousness of the contemporary, and new philosophical episteme - relevant to thought-systems in the Indian subcontinent. The author discusses the present lack of original philosophical discourse in the context of South Asia, especially India and investigates the reasons of such absences. It also investigates the reasons for decline in traditional philosophical schools and Sanskritic studies in the subcontinent. The book discusses the manner in which Indian thinkers from the (...)
     
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  15. Tommi Lehtonen (2000). The Notion of Merit in Indian Religions. Asian Philosophy 10 (3):189 – 204.score: 160.8
    There are uses of the term merit in Indian religions which also appear in secular contexts, but in addition there are other uses that are not encountered outside religion. Transfer of merit is a specific doctrine in whose connection the term merit is used with an intention which is not the same as that found in nonreligious contexts. Two main types of transfer of merit can be distinguished. First, the transfer of merit has been associated with certain ritual practices (...)
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  16. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). The Collision of Language and Metaphysics in the Search of Self-Identity: On Ahaṃkāra and Asmitā in Sāṃkhya-Yoga. ARGUMENT 1 (1):37-48.score: 160.2
    The author of this paper discusses some major points vital for two classical Indian schools of philosophy: (1) a significant feature of linguistic analysis in the Yoga tradition; (2) the role of the religious practice (iśvara-pranidhana) in the search for true self-identity in Samkhya and Yoga darśanas with special reference to their gnoseological purposes; and (3) some possible readings of ‘ahamkara’ and ‘asmita’ displayed in the context of Samkhya-Yoga phenomenology and metaphysics. The collision of language and metaphysics refers (...)
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  17. Harold Coward (1990). Derrida and Indian Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 154.8
    Coward (religious studies, U. of Calgary) explores the similarities and differences between the language theories of modern French philosopher Jacques Derrida and several traditional Indian schools of thought.
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  18. O. N. Krishnan (2004). In Search of Reality: A Layman's Journey Through Indian Philosophy. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.score: 145.8
    A Comparative analysis of the philosophical systems of Upanishads Advaita Vedanta and the various schools of Buddhism in a comprehensive manner.
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  19. Will Rasmussen (2009). The Realism of Universals in Plato and Nyāya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (3):231-252.score: 142.2
    It has become commonplace in introductions to Indian philosophy to construe Plato’s discussion of forms (εἶδος/ἰδέα) and the treatment in Nyāya and Vaiśeṣika of universals ( sāmānya/jāti ) as addressing the same philosophical issue, albeit in somewhat different ways. While such a comparison of the similarities and differences has interest and value as an initial reconnaissance of what each says about common properties, an examination of the roles that universals play in the rest of their philosophical enquiries vitiates this (...)
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  20. Kevin Burns (2006). Eastern Philosophy: The Greatest Thinkers and Sages From Ancient to Modern Times. Enchanted Lion Books.score: 129.6
    A clear and engaging presentation of history's most influential Eastern thinkers Eastern Philosophy provides a detailed but accessible analysis of the work of nearly sixty thinkers from all of the major Eastern philosophical traditions, from the earliest times to the present day. Covering systems, schools, and individuals, Eastern Philosophy presents founder figures such as Zoroaster and Mohammed as well as modern thinkers such as Nishida Kitaro, perhaps the preeminent figure within modern Japanese philosophy. From Buddhism to Islam, Confucius to (...)
     
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  21. Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (2001). Knowledge and Liberation in Classical Indian Thought. Palgrave.score: 129.6
    Classical Indian schools of philosophy seek to attain a supreme end to existence--liberation from the cycle of lives. This book looks at four conceptions of liberation and the roles of analytic inquiry and philosophical knowledge in its attainment. The central motivation of Indian philosophy--the quest for the Highest Good--is situated in the analytic philosophical activity of key thinkers.
     
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  22. Peter Commandeur (2000). Jacob van Sluis, Cartesian Physics in Two Unknown Disputations by Pierre Bayle Pierre Bayle (1647-1706) Was Professor of Philosophy at the Illustrious School in Rotterdam From 1681 Until 1693. Little is Known About His Courses There. However, the Discovery of Two Disputations, Theses Philosophicae, Which Were Defended by Students Under His Supervision, Makes Clear That He Taught Elementary Cartesian Physics in a Rather Orthodox Way. It is Obvious. [REVIEW] Bijdragen, Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie En Theologie 61 (2):201.score: 129.0
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  23. Kathleen Marie Higgins (2001). World Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 126.0
    Lecture 1. Beginnings -- Lecture 2. Western metaphysics -- Lecture 3. Soul & body -- Lecture 4. The good life & the role of reason -- Lecture 5. Western & African thought compared -- Lecture 6. Traditional beliefs & philosophy -- Lecture 7. American Indian thinking -- Lecture 8. Mesoamerican thought -- Lecture 9. Ethics & social thought in Latin America -- Lecture 10. Indian thought on supreme reality -- Lecture 11. The dualism of the Samkhya school -- (...)
     
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  24. Prajnanananda (1973). Schools of Indian Philosophical Thought. Calcutta,Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay.score: 126.0
     
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  25. Doboom Tulku & Maya Joshi (eds.) (2010). Pramāṇa: Dharmakīrti and the Indian Philosophical Debate. Manohar Publishers & Distributors.score: 126.0
    Indian philosophical thought on Pramana (valid cognition) is a rich achievement that merits attention not only for its technical brilliance and variety but also for the ways in which it reverberates with contemporary discussions in science. In a spirit of free and open enquiry, Tibet House collaborated with the Drepung Monastic University at Mundgod, Karnataka to organize a monastic debate that was both traditional and contemporary. This debate was special in that it grew upon the pre-Buddhist traditions of thought (...)
     
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  26. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. (...)
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  27. Shyam Ranganathan, Hindu Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.6
    The compound “Hindu philosophy” is ambiguous. Minimally it stands for a tradition of Indian philosophical thinking. However, it could be interpreted as designating one comprehensive philosophical doctrine, shared by all Hindu thinkers. The term “Hindu philosophy” is often used loosely in this philosophical or doctrinal sense, but this usage is misleading. There is no single, comprehensive philosophical doctrine shared by all Hindus that distinguishes their view from contrary philosophical views associated with other Indian religious movements such as Buddhism (...)
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  28. Ali Naqi Baqershahi (2008). Ultimate Reality in Indian Philosophical Systems. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:5-13.score: 120.6
    The thrust of this article is to give a brief account of the ultimate reality as viewed by Indian philosophical system namely, Vedic philosophy, Upanisads, Buddhism, Jainism and Charvaka. Though the root of this issue is traceable to the Vedic hymns, there are various interpretations of these hymns concerning the nature of ultimate reality, for instance some of the orientalists introduces henotheism as a transitional stage from polytheism to monotheism in Indian philosophy but according to some of the (...)
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  29. Michael Krom (2007). Vain Philosophy, the Schools and Civil Philosophy. Hobbes Studies 20 (1):93-119.score: 120.0
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  30. Constantine Cavarnos (2003). Orthodoxy and Philosophy: Lectures Delivered at St. Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary: An Illuminating Discussion of Orthodox Christianity with Reference to Ancient Greek and Modern Western Philosophy. Institute for Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.score: 120.0
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  31. John P. Burgess (1992). How Foundational Work in Mathematics Can Be Relevant to Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:433 - 441.score: 117.0
    Foundational work in mathematics by some of the other participants in the symposium helps towards answering the question whether a heterodox mathematics could in principle be used as successfully as is orthodox mathematics in scientific applications. This question is turn, it will be argued, is relevant to the question how far current science is the way it is because the world is the way it is, and how far because we are the way we are, which is a (...)
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  32. Prabal Kumar Sen (2013). Daya Krishna on Some Indian Theories of Negation: A Critique. Philosophy East and West 63 (4):543-561.score: 117.0
    Contrary Thinking, an anthology of selected essays by Daya Krishna, contains, among others, two essays that deal with problems pertaining to negation: “Negation: Can Philosophy Ever Recover from It?” and “Some Problems Regarding Thinking about Abhāva in the Indian Tradition.” These essays comprise part 5 of this book, and the editorial introduction to this part concludes with the following remark:With characteristic philosophical irony, Daya Krishna raises the problem that non-being itself is non-existent and that negation is nothing at all.In (...)
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  33. Yoichi Iwasaki (2008). Religious and Epistemological Aspects of the Indian Theory of Verbal Understanding. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:105-111.score: 117.0
    The various schools of the Indian classical philosophy have discussed the issue how we understand the meaning from an utterance. In the present paper, I analyse the ancient controversy on this issue between two schools, Naiyāyikas and Vaiśeṣikas, and attempt to show that it has two aspects of religious and epistemological natures. Vaiśeṣikas, on the ground that the process of the verbal understanding is identical with that of the inference, claim that the verbal understanding is merely a (...)
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  34. John White (2012). Philosophy in Primary Schools? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):449-460.score: 109.2
    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the Journal of Philosophy of Education Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on ‘Philosophy for Children in Transition’, so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result is patchy; many, but not all, of the papers in the Special Issue deal with issues far removed from the (...)
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  35. The Cowherds (2011). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. OUP USA.score: 108.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd C CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. (...)
     
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  36. Michael Edwards (2012). The Fate of Commentary in the Philosophy of the Schools, C.1550–1640. Intellectual History Review 22 (4):519-536.score: 105.6
    (2012). THE FATE OF COMMENTARY IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SCHOOLS, C.1550–1640. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 519-536. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.725558.
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  37. Norbert Max Samuelson (1994). Judaism and the Doctrine of Creation. Cambridge University Press.score: 99.0
    The topic of this book is 'creation'. It breaks down into discussions of two distinct, but interrelated, questions: what does the universe look like, and what is its origin? The opinions about creation considered by Norbert Samuelson come from the Hebrew scriptures, Greek philosophy, Jewish philosophy, and contemporary physics. His perspective is Jewish, liberal, and philosophical. It is 'Jewish' because the foundation of the discussion is biblical texts interpreted in the light of traditional rabbinic texts. It is 'philosophical' because the (...)
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  38. John Bryan Davis (2003). The Theory of the Individual in Economics: Identity and Value. Routledge.score: 99.0
    The concept of the individual and his/her motivations is a bedrock of philosophy. All strands of thought at heart contain to a particular theory of the individual. Economics, though, is guilty of taking this hugely important concept without questioning how we theorize it. This superb book remedies this oversight. The new approach put forward by Davies is to pay more attention to what moral philosophy may offer us in the study of personal identity, self consciousness and will. This crosses the (...)
     
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  39. Debbie Whittaker (2008). Philosophy in Schools. Questions 8:2-2.score: 98.4
    Description of the Center for the Advancement of Philosophy in the Schools (CAPS) program at California State University, Long Beach. The program places undergraduate philosophy students in area schools to lead pre-college students in various philosophical learning activities.
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  40. Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper (2011). Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.score: 96.0
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is canvassed (...)
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  41. David T. Hansen, Jason Thomas Wozniak & Ana Cecilia Galindo Diego (forthcoming). Fusing Philosophy and Fieldwork in a Study of Being a Person in the World: An Interim Commentary. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-12.score: 96.0
    In this article, we describe a longitudinal inquiry into what it means to be a person in our contemporary world. Our method constitutes a dynamic, non-objectifying fusion of empirical and philosophical anthropology. Field-based anthropology examines actualities: how people lead their lives and talk about them. Philosophical anthropology addresses possibilities: who and what people could become in light of actualities while not being determined by them. We describe and illustrate our fieldwork in the classrooms of 16 teachers who work in New (...)
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  42. Kristian Horn (1981). Secular Life Philosophy as a Subject in Schools in Norway. Journal of Moral Education 10 (2):109-116.score: 96.0
    Abstract In Norway changes in legislation in recent years have loosened the firm hold of the philosophy of the Christian Church in the schools and given room for alternative secular philosophy both in elementary schools and in teachers? colleges.
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  43. Kelley Ross, Chicago Schools: Economics, Religion, Philosophy, & Law.score: 96.0
    The references to "Chicago" (meaning, of course, the University of Chicago) Schools of economics and history of religion, and the quotation of Allan Bloom, who may be considered to belong to a Chicago school of philosophy, may suggest a general endorsement of "Chicago" ideas. This is not the case.
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  44. Allan M. Savage (2008). Phenomenological Philosophy and Orthodox Christian Scientific Ecological Theology. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2).score: 96.0
    Contemporary philosophy, to be useful to Orthodox Christian theology, must capture the “essence” of the divine and human activity in the world in the scientific sense of Edmund Husserl. Scholastic philosophy is no longer an academically privileged supporter of theology in the interpretation of the universe. In its place, this paper suggests that phenomenological philosophy becomes the unique and transcendent partner, as it were, in the interpretive dialogue. The methodological thinking of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger offers a way (...)
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  45. Claus Oetke (2011). Two Investigations on the Madhyamakakārikās and the Vigrahavyāvartanī. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (3):245-325.score: 93.6
    Purpose of the article is to provide support for the contention that two fundamental treatises representing the teaching of Madhyamaka, viz. the Mūlamadhyamakakārikās and the Vigrahavyāvartanī, were designed to establish and justify a metaphysical tenet claiming that no particulars of any kind can exist on some level of final analysis and that this was the only primary concern of those works. Whereas the former text is in the first place dedicated to providing proofs of the central metaphysical thesis the major (...)
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  46. Frederick M. Smith (2011). Predestination and Hierarchy: Vallabhācārya's Discourse on the Distinctions Between Blessed, Rule-Bound, Worldly, and Wayward Souls (the Puṣṭipravāhamaryādābheda). [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (2):173-227.score: 93.6
    The Puṣṭipravāhamaryādābheda (PPM) by Vallabhācārya (1479–1531?) is a brief work (25 verses) written in Sanskrit in about the year 1500, which is accompanied by four Sanskrit commentaries and one Hindi (Brajbhāṣạ) commentary. The most important and authoritative commentary is by Puruṣottama, written about two centuries after the original text. The article contains a translation of the PPM with long extracts from the commentaries, particularly the one composed by Puruṣottama. After an introduction placing the PPM’s doctrine of the hierarchy of embodied (...)
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  47. Woodbridge Riley (1958). American Philosophy: The Early Schools. New York, Russell & Russell.score: 91.2
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  48. David A. Shapiro (2002). Philosophy in the Schools Project. Questions: Philosophy for Young People 2:8-8.score: 91.2
    In the pursuit of a quality and well-rounded education with philosophy, Shapiro conducts an introductory lesson to students and teachers alike in order to develop deeper, more philosophical questions from their students. Academically, the article expands detail on tutoring in philosophy, analytical practices, and metaphysical activities.
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  49. Andrew J. Nicholson (2007). Reconciling Dualism and Non-Dualism: Three Arguments in Vijñānabhikṣu's Bhedābheda Vedānta. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (4):371-403.score: 90.6
    The late 16th century Indian philosopher Vijñānabhikṣu is most well known today for his commentaries on Sāṃkhya and Yoga texts. However, the majority of his extant corpus belongs to the tradition of Bhedābheda (Difference and Non-Difference) Vedānta. This article elucidates three Vedāntic arguments from Vijñānabhikṣu’s voluminous commentary on the Brahma Sūtra, entitled Vijñānāmṛtabhāṣya (Commentary on the Nectar of Knowledge). The first section of the article explores the meaning of bhedābheda, showing that in Vijñānabhikṣu’s understanding, “difference and non-difference” does not (...)
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  50. Bart Dessein (2011). Time, Temporality, and the Characteristic Marks of the Conditioned: Sarvāstivāda and Madhyamaka Buddhist Interpretations. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):341 - 360.score: 90.0
    According to the Buddhist concept of ?dependent origination? (prat?tyasamutp?da), discrete factors come into existence because of a combination of causes (hetu) and conditions (pratyaya). Such discrete factors, further, are combinations of five aggregates (pañ caskandha) that, themselves, are subject to constant change. Discrete factors, therefore, lack a self-nature (?tman). The passing through time of discrete factors is characterized by the ?characteristic marks of the conditioned?: birth (utp?da), change in continuance (sthityanyath?tva), and passing away (vyaya); or, alternatively: birth (j?ti), duration (sthiti), (...)
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