Search results for 'Individuation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Matteo Morganti (2011). Bundles, Individuation and Indiscernibility. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 7 (1):36-48.score: 24.0
    In a recent paper, Sun Demirli (2010) proposes an allegedly new way of conceiving of individuation in the context of the bundle theory of object constitution. He suggests that allowing for distance relations to individuate objects solves the problems with worlds containing indiscernible objects that would otherwise affect the theory. The aim of the present paper is i) To show that Demirli’s proposal falls short of achieving this goal and ii) To carry out a more general critical assessment of (...)
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  2. Tuomas E. Tahko (2013). More Kinds of Being: A Further Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms, by E. J. Lowe. [REVIEW] Mind 122 (485):302-305.score: 24.0
    Book review of 'More Kinds of Being: A Further Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms' (2009, Wiley-Blackwell). By E. J. LOWE.
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  3. Paulo Abrantes & Charbel Niño El-Hani (2009). Gould, Hull, and the Individuation of Scientific Theories. Foundations of Science 14 (4):295-313.score: 24.0
    When is conceptual change so significant that we should talk about a new theory, not a new version of the same theory? We address this problem here, starting from Gould’s discussion of the individuation of the Darwinian theory. He locates his position between two extremes: ‘minimalist’—a theory should be individuated merely by its insertion in a historical lineage—and ‘maximalist’—exhaustive lists of necessary and sufficient conditions are required for individuation. He imputes the minimalist position to Hull and attempts a (...)
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  4. Andrei A. Buckareff (2011). Action-Individuation and Doxastic Agency. Theoria 77 (4):312-332.score: 24.0
    In this article, I challenge the dominant view of the importance of the debate over action-individuation. On the dominant view, it is held that the conclusions we reach about action-individuation make little or no difference for other debates in the philosophy of action, much less in other areas of philosophy. As a means of showing that the dominant view is mistaken, I consider the implications of accepting a given theory of action-individuation for thinking about doxastic agency. In (...)
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  5. Wayne A. Davis (2005). Concepts and Epistemic Individuation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):290-325.score: 24.0
    Christopher Peacocke has presented an original version of the perennial philosophical thesis that we can gain substantive metaphysical and epistemological insight from an analysis of our concepts. Peacocke's innovation is to look at how concepts are individuated by their possession conditions, which he believes can be specified in terms of conditions in which certain propositions containing those concepts are accepted. The ability to provide such insight is one of Peacocke's major arguments for his theory of concepts. I will critically examine (...)
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  6. Adele Mercier (1993). Normativism and the Mental: A Problem of Language Individuation. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 72 (1):71-88.score: 24.0
    My aim in this paper is two?fold. I start by contrasting three versions of externalist arguments based on etiological considerations, whose differences are not often appreciated. My purpose in doing so is to isolate one of these versions of externalism as most supportive of current anti?individualist attitudes toward the mental. My second aim is to show that this version, which I call (for reasons soon to be clear) Dialectal Etiology , is marred to a greater extent than the other two (...)
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  7. Keith Butler (1998). Content, Computation, and Individuation. Synthese 114 (2):277-92.score: 24.0
    The role of content in computational accounts of cognition is a matter of some controversy. An early prominent view held that the explanatory relevance of content consists in its supervenience on the the formal properties of computational states (see, e.g., Fodor 1980). For reasons that derive from the familiar Twin Earth thought experiments, it is usually thought that if content is to supervene on formal properties, it must be narrow; that is, it must not be the sort of content that (...)
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  8. Robert D. Rupert (1998). On the Relationship Between Naturalistic Semantics and Individuation Criteria for Terms in a Language of Thought. Synthese 117 (1):95-131.score: 24.0
    Naturalistically minded philosophers hope to identify a privileged nonsemantic relation that holds between a mental representation m and that which m represents, a relation whose privileged status underwrites the assignment of reference to m. The naturalist can accomplish this task only if she has in hand a nonsemantic criterion for individuating mental representations: it would be question-begging for the naturalist to characterize m, for the purpose of assigning content, as 'the representation with such and such content'. If we individuate mental (...)
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  9. Theodore Scaltsas (2012). Knowledge as 'True Belief Plus Individuation' in Plato. Topoi 31 (2):137-149.score: 24.0
    In Republic V, Plato distinguishes two different cognitive powers, knowledge and belief, which operate differently on different types of object. I argue that in Republic VI Plato modifies this account, and claims that there is a single cognitive power, which under different circumstances behaves either as knowledge or as belief. I show that the circumstances which turn true belief into knowledge are the provision of an individuation account of the object of belief, which reveals the ontological status and the (...)
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  10. Gianfranco Pellegrino (2006). Particularism and Individuation: Disappearing, Not Varying, Features. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 21 (2):54-70.score: 24.0
    Particularism denies that invariant valence is always possible and that it is needed in sound moral theorising. It relies on variabilism, namely the idea that the relevant features of a given situation can alter their moral valence even across seemingly similar cases. An alternative model is defended (the “disappearing model”), in which changes in the overall relevance of complex cases are explained by re-individuation of the constituent features: certain features do not alter their relevance in consequence of contextual changes, (...)
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  11. Michael Gorman (1992). Henry of Oyta's Nominalism and the Principle of Individuation. Modern Schoolman 69 (2):135-148.score: 24.0
    Henry’s view of individuation makes him a nominalist; this doesn’t stop him from talking about the principle of individuation.
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  12. Milton Karl Munitz (ed.) (1971). Identity and Individuation. New York,New York University Press.score: 24.0
     
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  13. Alberto Toscano (2005). The Theatre of Producation: Philosophy and Individuation Bewteen Kant and Deleuze. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    This book provides both a historical analysis of the philosophical problem of individuation, and a new trajectory in its treatment. Drawing on the work of Gilles Deleuze, as well as C.S. Peirce and the lesser-known Gilbert Simondon, Alberto Toscano takes the problem of individuation, as reconfigured by Kant and Nietzsche, into the realm of modernity, providing a unique and vibrant contribution to contemporary debates in European philosophy.
     
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  14. Derk Pereboom (1995). Conceptual Structure and the Individuation of Content. Philosophical Perspectives 9:401-428.score: 22.0
    Current attempts to understand psychological content divide into two families of views. According to externalist accounts such as those advanced by Tyler Burge and Ruth Millikan, psychological content does not supervene on the physical features of the individual subject, but is fixed partially by the nature of the world external to her.1 In the rival functional role theories developed by Ned Block and Brian Loar, content does supervene on the physical features of the individual, and is, in addition, determined solely (...)
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  15. Frances Gray (2008). Jung, Irigaray, Individuation: Philosophy, Analytical Psychology, and the Question of the Feminine. Routledge.score: 22.0
    The dreaming body -- The philosophical Jung -- Locating identities : individual and collective matters -- Projection : the mirror image -- Divine reversal -- Mimesis revisited : Demeter and Persephone -- Jung, Irigaray, and essentialism : a new look at an old problem -- Speaking of the collective unconscious.
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  16. B. Scott (2007). The Co-Emergence of Parts and Wholes in Psychological Individuation. Constructivist Foundations 2 (2-3):65-71.score: 22.0
    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide a constructivist account of the "self as subject" that avoids the need for any metaphysical assumptions. Findings: The thesis developed in this paper is that the human "psychological individual," "self" or "subject" is an emergent within the nexus of human social interaction. With respect to psychological and social wholes (composites) there is no distinction between the form of the elements and the form of the composites they constitute i.e., all elements have (...)
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  17. Wayne A. Davis (2005). Concept Individuation, Possession Conditions, and Propositional Attitudes. Noûs 39 (1):140-66.score: 21.0
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  18. Bill Brewer (1998). Levels of Explanation and the Individuation of Events: A Difficulty for the Token Identity Theory. Acta Analytica 20 (20):7-24.score: 21.0
    We make how a person acts intelligible by revealing it as rational in the light of what she perceives, thinks, wants and so on. For example, we might explain that she reached out and picked up a glass because she was thirsty and saw that it contained water. In doing this, we are giving a causal explanation of her behaviour in terms of her antecedent beliefs, desires and other attitudes. Her wanting a drink and realizing that the glass contained one (...)
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  19. Jesse R. Steinberg & Alan M. Steinberg (2007). Disembodied Minds and the Problem of Identification and Individuation. Philosophia 35 (1):75-93.score: 21.0
    We consider and reject a variety of attempts to provide a ground for identifying and differentiating disembodied minds. Until such a ground is provided, we must withhold inclusion of disembodied minds from our picture of the world.
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  20. E. J. Lowe (2009). More Kinds of Being: A Further Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 21.0
    Taking into account significant developments in the metaphysical thinking of E. J. Lowe over the past 20 years, More Kinds of Being:A Further Study of ...
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  21. Mark B. Okrent (1990). Individuation and Intentional Ascriptions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):461-480.score: 21.0
  22. Martin Rechenauer (1997). Individualism, Individuation and That-Clauses. Erkenntnis 46 (1):49-67.score: 21.0
    Brian Loar has argued that the well-known arguments against individualism in the philosophy of mind are insufficient because they rely on the assumption that that-clauses uniquely capture psychological content. He tried to show that this is not the use of that-clauses in philosophical psychology. I argue that he does not succeed in his argument. That-clauses sometimes capture psychological content, if our system of mental ascription is to be workable at all. I argue further that individualism tends to be at odds (...)
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  23. Roger Teichmann (1992). Whyte on the Individuation of Desires. Analysis 52 (2):103-7.score: 21.0
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  24. Mark Rowlands (1990). Anomalism, Supervenience, and Davidson on Content-Individuation. Philosophia 20 (3):295-310.score: 21.0
    Supervenience is compatible with anomalism: biconditional laws are ruled out by the disjunctive base, and the wideness of mental states rules out one-way psychophysical laws, as there's no single property in the base.
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  25. Alan Sidelle (1989). Necessity, Essence, and Individuation: A Defense of Conventionalism. Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
  26. Tyler Burge (1989). Individuation and Causation in Psychology. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 707 (4):303-22.score: 21.0
     
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  27. Mutsumi Imai & Reiko Mazuka (2007). Language‐Relative Construal of Individuation Constrained by Universal Ontology: Revisiting Language Universals and Linguistic Relativity. Cognitive Science 31 (3):385-413.score: 21.0
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  28. John Duns Scotus (2005). Early Oxford Lecture on Individuation. Franciscan Institute.score: 21.0
  29. M. I. Ferreira (2011). On Meaning: Individuation and Identity--The Definition of a World View. Cambridge Scholars Pub..score: 21.0
     
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  30. Basileios Kroustallis (2006). Content Individuation in Marr's Theory of Vision. Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (1):57-71.score: 21.0
     
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  31. Roman Lesmeister (2009). Selbst Und Individuation: Facetten von Subjektivität Und Intersubjektivität in der Psychoanalyse. Brandes & Apsel.score: 21.0
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  32. E. J. Lowe (1989). Kinds of Being: A Study of Individuation, Identity, and the Logic of Sortal Terms. Blackwell.score: 21.0
     
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  33. Orland Otway Norris (1927). A Behaviorist Account of Individuation. Chicago.score: 21.0
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  34. Francisco Suárez (1982). Suárez on Individuation: Metaphysical Disputation V, Individual Unity and its Principle. Marquette University Press.score: 21.0
  35. Jean-Marie Vaysse (ed.) (2006). Technique, Monde, Individuation: Heidegger, Simondon, Deleuze. Olms.score: 21.0
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  36. Chauncey Maher (2011). Action Individuation: A Normative Functionalist Approach. Philosophical Explorations 14 (1):99-116.score: 20.0
    How or in virtue of what does any one particular action differ from another? Available views on the issue of action individuation tend to emphasize the descriptive features of actions, such as where and when they occur, or what they cause or are caused by. I contend instead that actions are individuated by their normative features, such as what licenses them and what they license in turn. In this essay, deploying a suggestion from Sellars and Brandom, I argue specifically (...)
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  37. Gwenaëlle Aubry (2008). Individuation, particularisation et détermination selon Plotin. Phronesis 53 (3):271-289.score: 20.0
    Plotinus' formulation of the problem of the individual should not be reduced to the question of whether or not one can accept Forms of Individuals. First, if Plotinus does indeed posit an intelligible foundation of individuality, there are no grounds to identify this foundation with a Form: it must rather be considered a logos. Second, we must, in addition to this intelligible "principle of distinction", allow for a sensible "principle of individuation": the living body. Finally, we have to distinguish (...)
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  38. E. J. Lowe (2007). Sortals and the Individuation of Objects. Mind and Language 22 (5):514–533.score: 18.0
    It has long been debated whether objects are ‘sortally’ individuated. This paper begins by clarifying some of the key terms in play—in particular, ‘sortal’, ‘individuation’, and ‘object’. The term ‘individuation’ is taken to have both a cognitive and a metaphysical sense, in the former denoting the singling out of an object in thought and in the latter a determination relation between entities. ‘Sortalism’ is defined as the doctrine that only as falling under some specific sortal concept can an (...)
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  39. Jeffrey E. Brower (2011). Matter, Form, and Individuation. In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Few notions are more central to Aquinas’s thought than those of matter and form. Although he invokes these notions in a number of different contexts, and puts them to a number of different uses, he always assumes that in their primary or basic sense they are correlative both with each other and with the notion of a “hylomorphic compound”—that is, a compound of matter (hyle) and form (morphe). Thus, matter is an entity that can have form, form is an entity (...)
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  40. Dan Kaufman (2007). Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499-534.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I examine the crucial relationship between Locke’s theory of individuation and his theory of kinds. Locke holds that two material objects -- e.g., a mass of matter and an oak tree -- can be in the same place at the same time, provided that they are ‘of different kinds’. According to Locke, kinds are nominal essences, that is, general abstract ideas based on objective similarities between particularindividuals. I argue that Locke’s view on coinciding material objects is (...)
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  41. Mark Alfano (2009). Sensitivity Theory and the Individuation of Belief-Formation Methods. Erkenntnis 70 (2):271 - 281.score: 18.0
    In this paper it is argued that sensitivity theory suffers from a fatal defect. Sensitivity theory is often glossed as: (1) S knows that p only if S would not believe that p if p were false. As Nozick showed in his pioneering work on sensitivity theory, this formulation needs to be supplemented by a further counterfactual condition: (2) S knows that p only if S would believe p if p were true. Nozick further showed that the theory needs a (...)
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  42. Anderson Weekes (2006). Abstraction and Individuation in Whitehead and Wiehl: A Comparative Historical Approach. In Michel Weber Pierfrancesco Basile (ed.), Subjectivity, Process, and Rationality. Ontos Verlag.score: 18.0
    This paper looks at the history of the problem of individuation from Plato to Whitehead. Part I takes as its point of departure Reiner Wiehl’s interpretation of the different meanings of “abstract” in the metaphysics of Alfred North Whitehead and arrives at a corresponding taxonomy of different ways things can be called concrete. Part II compares the way philosophers in different periods understand the relation between thought and intuition. The view mostly associated with ancient philosophy is that thought and (...)
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  43. João Branquinho (2000). On the Individuation of Fregean Propositions. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:17-27.score: 18.0
    The aim of the paper is to sketch a principle of individuation that is intended to serve the Fregean notion of a proposition, a notion I take for granted. A salient feature of Fregean propositions, i.e. complexes of modes of presentation of objects (individuals, properties), is that they are fine-grained items, so fine-grained that even synonymous sentences might express different Fregean propositions. My starting point is the principle labelled by Gareth Evans the Intuitive Criterion of Difference for Thoughts, which (...)
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  44. Darrin W. Belousek (1999). Bell's Theorem, Nonseparability, and Spacetime Individuation in Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):46.score: 18.0
    We first examine Howard's analysis of the Bell factorizability condition in terms of 'separability' and 'locality' and then consider his claims that the violations of Bell's inequality by the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics should be interpreted in terms of 'nonseparability' rather than 'nonlocality' and that 'nonseparability' implies the failure of spacetime as a principle of individuation for quantum-mechanical systems. We will argue that his argument for the first claim is less than compelling and that any argument for the (...)
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  45. Michael V. Antony (1993). Social Relations and the Individuation of Thought. Mind 102 (406):247-61.score: 18.0
    Tyler Burge has argued that a necessary condition for individual's having many of the thoughts he has is that he bear certain relations to other language users. Burge's conclusion is based on a thought experiment in which an individual's social relations are imagined, counterfactually, to differ from how they are actually. The result is that it seems, counterfactually, the individual cannot be attributed many of the thoughts he can be actually. In the article, an alternative interpretation of Burge's thought experiment (...)
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  46. Ingo Brigandt (2004). Holism, Concept Individuation, and Conceptual Change. In M. Hernandez Iglesias (ed.), Proceedings of the 4th Congress of the Spanish Society for Analytic Philosophy.score: 18.0
    The paper discusses concept individuation in the context of scientific concepts and conceptual change in science. It is argued that some concepts can be individuated in different ways. A particular term may be viewed as corresponding to a single concept (which is ascribed to every person from a whole scientific field). But at the same time, we can legitimately individuate in a more fine grained manner, i.e., this term can also be considered as corresponding to two or several concepts (...)
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  47. S. Marc Cohen (1984). Aristotle and Individuation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1984 (s.v.):41-65.score: 18.0
    It is traditionally maintained that according to Aristotle, matter provides a principle of individuation. Objections of several sorts have been raised against this interpretation. One objection holds that for Aristotle it is form, rather than matter, that individuates. A more radical objection is that Aristotle does not propose any principle of individuation at all. Any adequate discussion of this issue must make clear precisely what problems such a principle is meant to address. This in turn requires that several (...)
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  48. Joseph Ulatowski (2012). Act Individuation: An Experimental Approach. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):249-262.score: 18.0
    Accounts of act individuation have attempted to capture peoples’ pre-theoretic intuitions. Donald Davidson has argued that a multitude of action descriptions designate only one act, while Alvin Goldman has averred that each action description refers to a distinct act. Following on recent empirical studies, I subject these accounts of act individuation to experimentation. The data indicate that people distinguish between actions differently depending upon the moral valence of the outcomes. Thus, the assumption that a single account of act (...)
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  49. Jack Copeland, Heather Dyke & Diane Proudfoot (2001). Temporal Parts and Their Individuation. Analysis 61 (4):289–293.score: 18.0
    Ignoring the temporal dimension, an object such as a railway tunnel or a human body is a three-dimensional whole composed of three-dimensional parts. The four-dimensionalist holds that a physical object exhibiting identity across time—Descartes, for example—is a four-dimensional whole composed of 'briefer' four-dimensional objects, its temporal parts. Peter van Inwagen (1990) has argued that four-dimensionalism cannot be sustained, or at best can be sustained only by a counterpart theorist. We argue that different schemes of individuation of temporal parts are (...)
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  50. Andreas Bartels (1996). Modern Essentialism and the Problem of Individuation of Spacetime Points. Erkenntnis 45 (1):25--43.score: 18.0
    In this paper Modern Essentialism is used to solve a problem of individuation of spacetime points in General Relativity that has been raised by a New Leibnizian Argument against spacetime substantivalism, elaborated by Earman and Norton. An earlier essentialistic solution, proposed by Maudlin, is criticized as being against both the spirit of metrical essentialism and the fundamental principles of General Relativity. I argue for a modified essentialistic account of spacetime points that avoids those obstacles.
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