Search results for 'Infancy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Carruthers (2002). The Roots of Scientific Reasoning: Infancy, Modularity, and the Art of Tracking. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Cambridge University Press. 73--95.score: 18.0
    This chapter examines the extent to which there are continuities between the cognitive processes and epistemic practices engaged in by human hunter-gatherers, on the one hand, and those which are distinctive of science, on the other. It deploys anthropological evidence against any form of 'no-continuity' view, drawing especially on the cognitive skills involved in the art of tracking. It also argues against the 'child-as-scientist' accounts put forward by some developmental psychologists, which imply that scientific thinking is present in early (...) and universal amongst humans who have sufficient time and resources to devote to it. In contrast, a modularist kind of 'continuity' account is proposed, according to which the innately channelled architecture of human cognition provides all the materials necessary for basic forms of scientific reasoning in older children and adults, needing only the appropriate sorts of external support, social context, and background beliefs and skills in order for science to begin its advance. (shrink)
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  2. P. Rochat (ed.) (1995). The Self in Infancy: Theory and Research. Elsevier.score: 15.0
    This book is a collection of current theoretical views and research on the self in early infancy, prior to self-identification and the well-documented emergence ...
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  3. H. P. Chen & O. C. Irwin (1946). Development of Speech During Infancy: Curve of Differential Percentage Indices. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (6):522.score: 15.0
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  4. E. Fivaz-Depeursinge, N. Favez & F. Frascarolo (2004). Threesome Intersubjectivity in Infancy: A Contribution to the Development of Self-Awareness. In Dan Zahavi, T. Grunbaum & Josef Parnas (eds.), The Structure and Development of Self-Consciousness: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. John Benjamins.score: 15.0
  5. O. C. Irwin & H. P. Chen (1946). Development of Speech During Infancy: Curve of Phonemic Types. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (5):431.score: 15.0
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  6. Orvis C. Irwin (1947). Development of Speech During Infancy: Curve of Phonemic Frequencies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (2):187.score: 15.0
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  7. Steven J. Luck Lisa M. Oakes, Heidi A. Baumgartner, Frederick S. Barrett, Ian M. Messenger (2013). Developmental Changes in Visual Short-Term Memory in Infancy: Evidence From Eye-Tracking. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
    We assessed visual short-term memory (VSTM) for color in 6- and 8-month-old infants (n = 76) using a one-shot change detection task. In this task, a sample array of two colored squares was visible for 517 ms, followed by a 317-ms retention period and then a 3000-ms test array consisting of one unchanged item and one item in a new color. We tracked gaze at 60 Hz while infants looked at the changed and unchanged items during test. When the two (...)
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  8. V. Slaughter, M. Heron & S. Sim (2002). Development of Preferences for the Human Body Shape in Infancy. Cognition 85 (3):71-81.score: 15.0
    Two studies investigated the development of infants' visual preferences for the human body shape. In Study 1, infants of 12,15 and 18 months were tested in a standard preferential looking experiment, in which they were shown paired line drawings of typical and scrambled bodies. Results indicated that the 18-month-olds had a reliable preference for the scrambled body shapes over typical body shapes, while the younger infants did not show differential responding. In Study 2, 12- and 18-month-olds were tested with the (...)
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  9. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (1996). An Empirical-Phenomenological Critique of the Social Construction of Infancy. Human Studies 19 (1):1 - 16.score: 12.0
    Developmental and clinical psychological findings on infancy over the past twenty years and more refute in striking ways both Piaget's and Lacan's negative characterizations of infants. Piaget's thesis is that the infant has an undifferentiated sense of self; Lacan's thesis is that the infant is no more than a fragmented piece of goods — a corps morcelé. Through an examination of recent and notable analyses of infancy by infant psychiatrist Daniel Stern, this paper highlights important features within the (...)
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  10. Rachel Jones (2012). Irigaray and Lyotard: Birth, Infancy, and Metaphysics. Hypatia 27 (1):139-162.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the ways in which Luce Irigaray and Jean-François Lyotard critique western metaphysics by drawing on notions of birth and infancy. It shows how both thinkers position birth as an event of beginning that can be reaffirmed in every act of initiation and recommencement. Irigaray's reading of Diotima's speech from Plato's Symposium is positioned as a key text for this project alongside a number of essays by Lyotard in which he explores the potency of infancy as (...)
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  11. Marco Fenici (forthcoming). Social Cognitive Abilities in Infancy: Is Mindreading the Best Explanation? Philosophical Psychology:1-25.score: 12.0
    I discuss three arguments that have been advanced in support of the epistemic mentalist view, i.e., the view that infants' social cognitive abilities (SCAs) manifest a capacity to attribute beliefs. The argument from implicitness holds that SCAs already reflect the possession of an “implicit” and “rudimentary” capacity to attribute representational states. Against it, I note that SCAs are significantly limited, and have likely evolved to respond to contextual information in situated interaction with others. I challenge the argument from parsimony by (...)
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  12. George Butterworth (1995). The Self as an Object of Consciousness in Infancy. In P. Rochat (ed.), The Self in Infancy: Theory and Research. Elsevier.score: 12.0
  13. Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter (2010). Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy. Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.score: 12.0
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to be more complex. Some facial expressions may have (...)
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  14. Amy G. Halberstadt & Fantasy T. Lozada (2011). Emotion Development in Infancy Through the Lens of Culture. Emotion Review 3 (2):158-168.score: 12.0
    The goal of this review is to consider how culture impacts the socialization of emotion development in infancy, and infants’ and young children’s subsequent outcomes. First, we argue that parents’ socialization decisions are embedded within cultural structures, beliefs, and practices. Second, we identify five broad cultural frames (collectivism/individualism; power distance; children’s place in family and culture; ways children learn; and value of emotional experience and expression) that help to organize current and future research. For each frame, we discuss the (...)
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  15. Stefanie Hoehl & Tricia Striano (2010). Discrete Emotions in Infancy: Perception Without Production? Emotion Review 2 (2):132-133.score: 12.0
    Camras and Shutter review evidence suggesting that infants’ facial expressions do not represent discrete emotions and cannot easily be matched to the facial expressions of adults. This raises the important question of whether infants have a notion about the meanings of discrete emotions at all. The authors do not discuss whether infants are sensitive to discrete emotional expressions when perceiving others. In our commentary we discuss evidence for the perception of discrete emotional facial expressions in infancy.
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  16. Philip J. Kellman & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1983). Perception of Partly Occluded Objects in Infancy* 1. Cognitive Psychology 15 (4):483–524.score: 9.0
    Four-month-old infants sometimes can perceive the unity of a partly hidden object. In each of a series of experiments, infants were habituated to one object whose top and bottom were visible but whose center was occluded by a nearer object. They were then tested with a fully visible continuous object and with two fully visible object pieces with a gap where the occluder had been. Pattems of dishabituation suggested that infants perceive the boundaries of a partly hidden object by analyzing (...)
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  17. Christina Behme & H. S. (2008). Language Learning in Infancy: Does the Empirical Evidence Support a Domain Specific Language Acquisition Device? Philosophical Psychology 21 (5):641 – 671.score: 9.0
    Poverty of the Stimulus Arguments have convinced many linguists and philosophers of language that a domain specific language acquisition device (LAD) is necessary to account for language learning. Here we review empirical evidence that casts doubt on the necessity of this domain specific device. We suggest that more attention needs to be paid to the early stages of language acquisition. Many seemingly innate language-related abilities have to be learned over the course of several months. Further, the language input contains rich (...)
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  18. Gergely Csibra (2010). Recognizing Communicative Intentions in Infancy. Mind and Language 25 (2):141-168.score: 9.0
    I make three related proposals concerning the development of receptive communication in human infants. First, I propose that the presence of communicative intentions can be recognized in others' behaviour before the content of these intentions is accessed or inferred. Second, I claim that such recognition can be achieved by decoding specialized ostensive signals. Third, I argue on empirical bases that, by decoding ostensive signals, human infants are capable of recognizing communicative intentions addressed to them. Thus, learning about actual modes of (...)
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  19. Beata Stawarska (2008). Feeling Good Vibrations in Dialogical Relations. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):217-236.score: 9.0
    I engage phenomenological and empirical perspectives on dialogical relations in infancy in a mutually enlightening and challenging relation. On the one hand, the empirical contributions provide evidence for the primacy of first-to-second person interrelatedness in human sociality, as opposed to the claim of primary syncretism heralded by Merleau-Ponty, and also in distinction from the ego-alter ego model routinely used in phenomenology. On the other hand, phenomenological considerations regarding the lived affective experience of dialogical relatedness enrich and render intelligible the (...)
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  20. Susan C. Johnson, Carol S. Dweck, Frances S. Chen, Hilarie L. Stern, Su-Jeong Ok & Maria Barth (2010). At the Intersection of Social and Cognitive Development: Internal Working Models of Attachment in Infancy. Cognitive Science 34 (5):807-825.score: 9.0
    Three visual habituation studies using abstract animations tested the claim that infants’ attachment behavior in the Strange Situation procedure corresponds to their expectations about caregiver–infant interactions. Three unique patterns of expectations were revealed. Securely attached infants expected infants to seek comfort from caregivers and expected caregivers to provide comfort. Insecure-resistant infants not only expected infants to seek comfort from caregivers but also expected caregivers to withhold comfort. Insecure-avoidant infants expected infants to avoid seeking comfort from caregivers and expected caregivers to (...)
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  21. Eva-Maria Simms (2001). Milk and Flesh: A Phenomenological Reflection on Infancy and Coexistence. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 32 (1):22-40.score: 9.0
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  22. Peter Carruthers (2013). Mindreading in Infancy. Mind and Language 28 (2):141-172.score: 9.0
    Various dichotomies have been proposed to characterize the nature and development of human mindreading capacities, especially in light of recent evidence of mindreading in infants aged 7 to 18 months. This article will examine these suggestions, arguing that none is currently supported by the evidence. Rather, the data support a modular account of the domain-specific component of basic mindreading capacities. This core component is present in infants from a very young age and does not alter fundamentally thereafter. What alters with (...)
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  23. Giorgio Agamben (1993). Infancy and History: The Destruction of Experience. Verso.score: 9.0
    Every written work can be regarded as the prologue (or rather, the broken cast) of a work never penned, and destined to remain so, because later works, ...
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  24. Roberta M. Berry (2005). Informed Consent Law, Ethics, and Practice: From Infancy to Reflective Adolescence. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):64-81.score: 9.0
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  25. I. Kiraly, B. Jovanovic, W. Prinz, G. Aschersleben & G. Gergely (2003). The Early Origins of Goal Attribution in Infancy. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):752-769.score: 9.0
    We contrast two positions concerning the initial domain of actions that infants interpret as goal-directed. The 'narrow scope' view holds that goal-attribution in 6- and 9-month-olds is restricted to highly familiar actions (such as grasping) (). The cue-based approach of the infant's 'teleological stance' (), however, predicts that if the cues of equifinal variation of action and a salient action effect are present, young infants can attribute goals to a 'wide scope' of entities including unfamiliar human actions and actions of (...)
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  26. Elizabeth S. Spelke, Perceiving Bimodally Specified Events in Infancy.score: 9.0
    Four-month-old infants can perceive bimodally speciiied events. They respond to relationships between the optic and acoustic stimulation that carries information about an object. Infants can do this by detecting the temporal synchrony of an object’s sounds and its optically specified impacts. They are sensitive both to the common tempo and to the simultaneity of such sounds and visible impacts. These findings support the view that intermodal perception depends at least in part on the detection of invariant relationships in patterns of (...)
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  27. A. C. Armstrong (1906). Herder and Fiske on the Prolongation of Infancy. Philosophical Review 15 (1):59-64.score: 9.0
  28. Sari Goldstein Ferber (2009). Co-Regulation of Stress in Uterus and During Early Infancy Mediates Early Programming of Gender Differences in Attachment Styles: Evolutionary, Genetic, and Endocrinal Perspectives. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):29-30.score: 9.0
  29. Bruce Hood (1994). Seeing, Reaching, Touching: The Relations Between Vision and Touch in Infancy. Mind and Language 9 (3):373-376.score: 9.0
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  30. Thomas Söderqvist & Craig Stillwell (1999). Review: The Historiography of Immunology Is Still in Its Infancy. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):205 - 215.score: 9.0
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  31. David Rakison (2007). Is Consciousness in its Infancy in Infancy? Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (s 9-10):66-89.score: 9.0
    In this article, I examine the literature from three domains of cognitive development in the first years of life — mathematics, categorization and induction — to determine whether infants possess concepts that allow them explicitly to reason and make inferences about the objects and events in the world. To achieve this aim, I use the distinction between procedural and declarative knowledge as a marker for the presence of access consciousness. According to J.M. Mandler, infants' early concepts are represented as accessible (...)
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  32. B. Elsner & G. Aschersleben (2003). Do I Get What You Get? Learning About the Effects of Self-Performed and Observed Actions in Infancy. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):732-751.score: 9.0
    The present study investigated whether infants learn the effects of other persons' actions like they do for their own actions, and whether infants transfer observed action-effect relations to their own actions. Nine-, 12-, 15- and 18-month-olds explored an object that allowed two actions, and that produced a certain salient effect after each action. In a self-exploration group, infants explored the object directly, whereas in two observation groups, infants first watched an adult model acting on the object and obtaining a certain (...)
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  33. F. C. Bartlett (1934). The Psychology of Infancy. By Victoria Hazlitt, D.Litt. (London: Methuen & Co. 1933. Pp. Ix. + 149. Price 5s. Net.). Philosophy 9 (34):245-.score: 9.0
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  34. Paulo Ghiraldelli Jr (2000). The Fundamentals of Gepeto's Philosophy of Education: Neopragmatism and Infancy in the Postmodern World. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):201–207.score: 9.0
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  35. Datyner Amy, Richmond Jenny & Henry Julie (2013). The Development of Empathy in Infancy: Insights From the Rapid Facial Mimicry Response. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
  36. Malinda Carpenter (2009). Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):380-392.score: 9.0
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  37. Robert A. Davis (2010). Government Intervention in Child Rearing: Governing Infancy. Educational Theory 60 (3):285-298.score: 9.0
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  38. Cirelli Laura, Einarson Kathleen, Lade Sarah & Trainor Laurel (2013). Interpersonal Motor Synchrony to a Musical Beat as a Cue for Social Cohesion During Infancy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
  39. Arthur O. Lovejoy (1922). The Length of Human Infancy in Eighteenth-Century Thought. Journal of Philosophy 19 (14):381-385.score: 9.0
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  40. Paulo Ghiraldelli (2000). The Fundamentals of Gepeto's Philosophy of Education: Neopragmatism and Infancy in the Postmodern World. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (2):201-207.score: 9.0
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  41. Sammy Perone & John P. Spencer (2013). Autonomy in Action: Linking the Act of Looking to Memory Formation in Infancy Via Dynamic Neural Fields. Cognitive Science 37 (1):1-60.score: 9.0
    Looking is a fundamental exploratory behavior by which infants acquire knowledge about the world. In theories of infant habituation, however, looking as an exploratory behavior has been deemphasized relative to the reliable nature with which looking indexes active cognitive processing. We present a new theory that connects looking to the dynamics of memory formation and formally implement this theory in a Dynamic Neural Field model that learns autonomously as it actively looks and looks away from a stimulus. We situate this (...)
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  42. Colin Starnes (1975). Saint Augustine on Infancy and Childhood. Augustinian Studies 6:15-43.score: 9.0
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  43. Wesley Raymond Wells (1922). An Historical Anticipation of John Fiske's Theory Regarding the Value of Infancy. Journal of Philosophy 19 (8):208-210.score: 9.0
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  44. Beke A. (2009). Event-Related Potential Features of Suprasegmental Speech Cues Processing in Infancy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 9.0
  45. Caroline Floccia Alejandrina Cristia, Amanda Seidl, Charlotte Vaughn, Rachel Schmale, Ann Bradlow (2012). Linguistic Processing of Accented Speech Across the Lifespan. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 9.0
    In most of the world, people have regular exposure to multiple accents. Therefore, learning to quickly process accented speech is a prerequisite to successful communication. In this paper, we examine work on the perception of accented speech across the lifespan, from early infancy to late adulthood. Unfamiliar accents initially impair linguistic processing by infants, children, younger adults, and older adults, but listeners of all ages come to adapt to accented speech. Emergent research also goes beyond these perceptual abilities, by (...)
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  46. Alessandra Aloisi (2010). Memory and Infancy in Augustine. Rivista di Filosofia 101 (2):187-210.score: 9.0
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  47. Dima Amso & Scott P. Johnson (2005). Selection and Inhibition in Infancy: Evidence From the Spatial Negative Priming Paradigm. Cognition 95 (2):B27-B36.score: 9.0
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  48. S. Armon-Lotem (2001). Lauren B. Adamson: Communication Development During Infancy. Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):155-161.score: 9.0
     
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  49. S. L. Armon (2001). Review of “Communication Development During Infancy” by Lauren B. Adamson. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):155-162.score: 9.0
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  50. Renée Baillargeon & Su-hua Wang (2002). Event Categorization in Infancy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (2):85-93.score: 9.0
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