Search results for 'Infant' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Infanticide in Applied Ethics
  1. Andrew Chignell (2001). Infant Suffering Revisited. Religious Studies 37 (4):475-484.score: 24.0
    I respond to two sets of objections to my characterization of infant suffering and the problem that it presents to traditional theism. My main theses were that infant suffering to death is not ‘horrendous’ in the technical sense defined, but that a good God still needs to "balance off" rather than "defeat" such suffering. David Basinger, on the other hand, claims that some infant suffering should be considered horrendous, while Nathan Nobis suggests that such suffering must be (...)
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  2. Esther Thelen, Gregor Schöner, Christian Scheier & Linda B. Smith (2001). The Dynamics of Embodiment: A Field Theory of Infant Perseverative Reaching. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):1-34.score: 24.0
    The overall goal of this target article is to demonstrate a mechanism for an embodied cognition. The particular vehicle is a much-studied, but still widely debated phenomenon seen in 7–12 month-old-infants. In Piaget's classic “A-not-B error,” infants who have successfully uncovered a toy at location “A” continue to reach to that location even after they watch the toy hidden in a nearby location “B.” Here, we question the traditional explanations of the error as an indicator of infants' concepts of objects (...)
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  3. Colin Boyd (2012). The Nestlé Infant Formula Controversy and a Strange Web of Subsequent Business Scandals. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):283-293.score: 24.0
    The marketing of infant formula in third-world countries in the 1970s by Nestlé S.A. gave rise to a consumer boycott that came to be a widely taught case study in the field of Business Ethics. This article extends that case study by identifying three specific individuals who were associated with managing Nestlé’s response to that boycott. It reveals their subsequent direct involvement in a number of additional “classic” 1980s business scandals (some of which ended with major criminal trials and (...)
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  4. Joseph Soltis (2004). The Signal Functions of Early Infant Crying. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):443-458.score: 24.0
    In this article I evaluate recent attempts to illuminate the human infant cry from an evolutionary perspective. Infants are born into an uncertain parenting environment, which can range from indulgent care of offspring to infanticide. Infant cries are in large part adaptations that maintain proximity to and elicit care from caregivers. Although there is not strong evidence for acoustically distinct cry types, infant cries may function as a graded signal. During pain-induced autonomic nervous system arousal, for example, (...)
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  5. Jørn Bjerre (2012). Does Infant Cognition Research Undermine Sociological Theory? A Critique of Bergesen's Attack on Durkheim. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (4):444-464.score: 24.0
    This article discusses how the results of infant research challenge the assumptions of the classical sciences of social behaviour. According to A.J. Bergesen, the findings of infant research invalidate Durkheim's theory of mental categories, thus requiring a re-theorizing of sociology. This article argues that Bergesen's reading of Emile Durkheim is incorrect, and his review of the infant research in fact invalidates his argument. Reviewing the assumptions of sociology in the light of the findings of infant research, (...)
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  6. Faith E. Fletcher, Paul Ndebele & Maureen C. Kelley (2008). Infant Feeding and Hiv in Sub-Saharan Africa: What Lies Beneath the Dilemma? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (5):307-330.score: 24.0
    The debate over how to best guide HIV-infected mothers in resource-poor settings on infant feeding is more than two decades old. Globally, breastfeeding is responsible for approximately 300,000 HIV infections per year, while at the same time, UNICEF estimates that not breastfeeding (formula feeding with contaminated water) is responsible for 1.5 million child deaths per year. The largest burden of these infections and deaths occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using this region as an example of the burden faced more generally (...)
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  7. R. S. Howe (2013). Infant Circumcision: The Last Stand for the Dead Dogma of Parental (Sovereignal) Rights. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):475-481.score: 24.0
    J S Mill used the term ‘dead dogma’ to describe a belief that has gone unquestioned for so long and to such a degree that people have little idea why they accept it or why they continue to believe it. When wives and children were considered chattel, it made sense for the head of a household to have a ‘sovereignal right’ to do as he wished with his property. Now that women and children are considered to have the full complement (...)
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  8. Eva Mark (2001). Is the Self of the Infant Preserved in the Adult? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):347-353.score: 24.0
    What does a confrontation between philosophy and psychoanalysis look like? My task is a philosophical investigation of a psychoanalytic concept. Thus, I offer a conceptual analysis of a concept that is used both clinically and as a part of a metapsychology. The concept that I investigate in this article is regression. I work with the following two problems: What does a conceptual analysis of the phenomenon called regression look like? Regression can be regarded as an instrument that can give us (...)
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  9. James J. McKenna (1990). Evolution and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Human Nature 1 (2):145-177.score: 24.0
    This paper and its subsequent parts (Part II and Part III) build on an earlier publication (McKenna 1986). They suggest that important clinical data on the relationship between infantile constitutional deficits and microenvironmental factors relevant to SIDS can be acquired by examining the physiological regulatory effects (well documented among nonhuman primates) that parents assert on their infants when they sleep together.I attempt to show why access to parental sensory cues (movement, touch, smell, sound) that induce arousals in infants while they (...)
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  10. Marilee Monnot (1999). Function of Infant-Directed Speech. Human Nature 10 (4):415-443.score: 24.0
    The relationship between a biological process and a behavioral trait indicates a proximate mechanism by which natural selection can act. In that context, examining an aspect of infant health is one method of investigating the adaptive significance of infant-directed speech (ID speech), and it could help to explain the widespread use of this communication style. The correlation between infant growth and infant-directed speech is positive and significant, and provides a vehicle for testing evolutionary history hypotheses.
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  11. Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey (2002). The Influence of Infant Facial Cues on Adoption Preferences. Human Nature 13 (4):437-455.score: 24.0
    Trivers’s theory of parental investment suggests that adults should decide whether or not to invest in a given infant using a cost-benefit analysis. To make the best investment decision, adults should seek as much relevant information as possible. Infant facial cues may serve to provide information and evoke feelings of parental care in adults. Four specific infant facial cues were investigated: resemblance (as a proxy for kinship), health, happiness, and cuteness. It was predicted that these cues would (...)
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  12. Luigi Matturri Anna M. Lavezzi (2012). Neuroanatomical Dysmorphology of the Medial Superior Olivary Nucleus in Sudden Fetal and Infant Death. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    This study expands our understanding of the organization of the human caudal pons, providing a morphologic characterization of the medial superior olivary nucleus, component of the superior olivary complex, that plays an important role in the processing of acoustic information. We examined victims of sudden unexplained fetal and infant death and controls (n=75), from 25 gestational weeks to 8 months of postnatal age, by complete autopsy and in-depth autonomic nervous system histological examination, particularly of the medial superior olivary nucleus, (...)
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  13. Helen Ball (2006). Parent-Infant Bed-Sharing Behavior. Human Nature 17 (3):301-318.score: 24.0
    An evolutionarily informed perspective on parent-infant sleep contact challenges recommendations regarding appropriate parent-infant sleep practices based on large epidemiological studies. In this study regularly bed-sharing parents and infants participated in an in-home video study of bed-sharing behavior. Ten formula-feeding and ten breast-feeding families were filmed for 3 nights (adjustment, dyadic, and triadic nights) for 8 hours per night. For breast-fed infants, mother-infant orientation, sleep position, frequency of feeding, arousal, and synchronous arousal were all consistent with previous sleep-lab (...)
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  14. Takefumi Kikusui Miho Nagasawa, Shota Okabe, Kazutaka Mogi (2012). Oxytocin and Mutual Communication in Mother-Infant Bonding. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Mother-infant bonding is universal to all mammalian species. In this review, we describe the manner in which reciprocal communication between the mother and infant leads to mother-infant bonding in rodents. In rats and mice, mother-infant bond formation is reinforced by various social stimuli, such as tactile stimuli and ultrasonic vocalizations from the pups to the mother, and feeding and tactile stimulation from the mother to the pups. Some evidence suggests that mother and infant can develop (...)
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  15. Miho Nagasawa, Shota Okabe, Kazutaka Mogi & Takefumi Kikusui (2012). Oxytocin and Mutual Communication in Mother-Infant Bonding. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Mother-infant bonding is universal to all mammalian species. In this review, we describe the manner in which reciprocal communication between the mother and infant leads to mother-infant bonding in rodents. In rats and mice, mother-infant bond formation is reinforced by various social stimuli, such as tactile stimuli and ultrasonic vocalizations from the pups to the mother, and feeding and tactile stimulation from the mother to the pups. Some evidence suggests that mother and infant can develop (...)
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  16. Katherine L. Waller, Anthony Volk & Vernon L. Quinsey (2004). The Effect of Infant Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Facial Features on Adoption Preference. Human Nature 15 (1):101-117.score: 24.0
    Infant facial characteristics may affect discriminative parental solicitude because they convey information about the health of the offspring. We examined the effect of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) infant facial characteristics on hypothetical adoption preferences, ratings of attractiveness, and ratings of health. As expected, potential parents were more likely to adopt “normal” infants, and they rated the FAS infants as less attractive and less healthy. Cuteness/attractiveness was the best predictor of adoption likelihood.
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  17. Roger Lee Mendoza (2012). A Case Study of Infant Health Promotion and Corporate Marketing of Milk Substitutes. Health Care Analysis 20 (2):196-211.score: 21.0
    The mismatch between the demand for, and supply of, health products has led to the increasing involvement of courts worldwide in health promotion and marketing. This study critically examines the implementation of one country’s Milk Code within the framework of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, and the efficacy of the judicial process in balancing corporate marketing and state regulatory objectives. Drawing upon the Philippine experience with its own Milk Code, it evaluates the capacities of courts to determine (...)
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  18. Manuela Stets, Mike Burt & Vincent M. Reid (2013). Infants Need More Variety – Increased Data Acquisition with Reduced Participant Attrition in Infant ERP Studies. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  19. F. C. Dockeray & W. L. Valentine (1939). A New Isolation Cabinet for Infant Research. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (2):211.score: 21.0
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  20. Andrew N. Meltzoff (1993). Molyneux's Babies: Cross-Modal Perception, Imitation, and the Mind of the Preverbal Infant. In Naomi M. Eilan (ed.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell. 219--235.score: 21.0
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  21. Heather Bortfeld, Katie Shaw & Nicole Depowski (2013). Disentangling the Influence of Salience and Familiarity on Infant Word Learning: Methodological Advances. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  22. Hiroki Mishina, Joan F. Hilton & John I. Takayama (2013). Trends and Variations in Infant Mortality Among 47 Prefectures in Japan. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):849-854.score: 21.0
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  23. A. H. Riesen (1942). Galvanic Skin Responses of Infant Chimpanzees. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (3):249.score: 21.0
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  24. Eva Maria Simms (1993). The Infant's Experience of the World: Stern, Merleau-Ponty and the Phenomenology of the Preverbal Self. Humanistic Psychologist 21 (1):26-40.score: 21.0
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  25. Nicholas A. Smith, Colleen R. Gibilisco, Rachel E. Meisinger & Maren Hankey (2013). Asymmetry in Infants' Selective Attention to Facial Features During Visual Processing of Infant-Directed Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  26. Andrew Chignell (1998). The Problem of Infant Suffering. Religious Studies 34 (2):205-217.score: 20.0
    The problem of infant suffering and death is often regarded as one of the more difficult versions of the problem of evil (see Ivan Karamazov), especially when one considers how God can be thought good to infant victims by the infant victims. In the first section of this paper, I examine two recent theodicies that aim to solve this problem but (I argue) fail. In the second section, I suggest that the only viable approach to the problem (...)
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  27. Francine Wynn (1997). The Embodied Chiasmic Relationship of Mother and Infant. Human Studies 20 (2):253-270.score: 18.0
    In this paper the very earliest relationship of mother and newborn will be described phenomenologically through an interlacing of Donald Winnicott''s work on maternal holding with Maurice Merleau-Ponty''s concepts of flesh and chiasm. Merleau-Ponty''s thinking suggests that the holding relationship described by Winnicott is formed as much by the infant''s holding of the mother as it is by mother''s holding of her infant. Both flex and bend towards each other and inscribe each other yet retain their own particularity. (...)
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  28. Neven Sesardic (2007). Sudden Infant Death or Murder? A Royal Confusion About Probabilities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):299 - 329.score: 18.0
    In this article I criticize the recommendations of some prominent statisticians about how to estimate and compare probabilities of the repeated sudden infant death and repeated murder. The issue has drawn considerable public attention in connection with several recent court cases in the UK. I try to show that when the three components of the Bayesian inference are carefully analyzed in this context, the advice of the statisticians turns out to be problematic in each of the steps.
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  29. Kathleen Wermke & Angela D. Friederici (2004). Developmental Changes of Infant Cries – the Evolution of Complex Vocalizations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):474-475.score: 18.0
    The signal functions of infant crying cannot be understood properly without due attention to their ontogenetic development. Based on our own research on the development of infant cries, we argue that the controversies in cry literature will not be solved by static models, but that progress will made only when considering ontogenetic changes in interpreting cry data.
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  30. James C. Baker (1985). The International Infant Formula Controversy: A Dilemma in Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (3):181 - 190.score: 18.0
    One of the most controversial issues to face any industry has been the infant formula problem, especially in the less-developed countries (LDCs). Producers of infant formula were confronted with a boycott which evolved from a grass-roots level to one which involved many nations, international and national public agencies, non-profit organizations, scientific research institutions, large church denominations, and every company in the industry. An international boycott was aimed at Nestlé, one of the largest producers of infant formula.The aim (...)
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  31. J. Nihlen Fahlquist & S. Roeser (2011). Ethical Problems with Information on Infant Feeding in Developed Countries. Public Health Ethics 4 (2):192-202.score: 18.0
    Most sources providing information on infant feeding strongly recommend breastfeeding. The WHO and UNICEF recommend that women breastfeed their babies and that health professionals promote breastfeeding. This creates severe pressure on women to breastfeed, a pressure which is ethically questionable since many women have physical or emotional problems with breastfeeding. In this article, we use insights from the ethics of risk to criticize the current breastfeeding policy. We argue that there are problems related to balancing aggregate wellbeing versus individual (...)
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  32. Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki (2011). How to Interpret Infant Socio-Cognitive Competence. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):483-497.score: 18.0
    I review recent evidence that very young, pre-verbal infants attribute belief-like states when anticipating the behavior of others. This evidence is drawn from infant performance on non-verbal false belief tasks. I argue that, contrary to typical interpretations, such evidence does not show that infants attribute belief-like states. Rather, it shows that infants apply an enhanced version of what Gergely ( 2011 ) calls the “teleological stance” to brief bouts of behavior. This requires them to parse behavioral sequences into goals (...)
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  33. Nathan Nobis (2001). ‘Balancing Out’ Infant Torture and Death: A Reply to Chignell. Religious Studies 37 (1):103-108.score: 18.0
    In a recent article published in this journal, Andrew Chignell proposes some candidates for greater or ‘balancing out’ goods that could explain why God allows some infants to be tortured to death. I argue that each of Chignell's proposals is either incoherent, metaphysically dubious, and/or morally objectionable. Thus, his proposals do not explain what might justify God in allowing infants to be tortured, and the existence of infant suffering remains a serious problem for traditional theism.
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  34. Francesca M. Bosco & Maurizio Tirassa (1998). Sharedness as an Innate Basis for Communication in the Infant. In M. A. Gernsbacher & S. J. Derry (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 162-166.score: 18.0
    From a cognitive perspective, intentional communication may be viewed as an agent's activity overtly aimed at modifying a partner's mental states. According to standard Gricean definitions, this requires each party to be able to ascribe mental states to the other, i.e., to entertain a so-called theory of mind. According to the relevant experimental literature, however, such capability does not appear before the third or fourth birthday; it would follow that children under that age should not be viewed as communicating agents. (...)
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  35. Nathan Nobis (2002). The Real Problem of Infant and Animal Suffering. Philo 5 (2):216-225.score: 18.0
    The problem of infant suffering and death has remained one of the most intractable problems for theists. Andrew Chignell has attempted to develop a theodicy for this problem that is based on Marilyn Adam’s paradigm for theodicy. However, his discussion repeatedly avoids the argument that, traditionally, most have thought to be the basis of this problem of evil. Thus, his theodicy provides the traditional theist with no adequate response to the problem. I argue that since infant suffering is (...)
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  36. Edward H. Hagen (2004). Is Excessive Infant Crying an Honest Signal of Vigor, One Extreme of a Continuum, or a Strategy to Manipulate Parents? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):463-464.score: 18.0
    An evolutionary account of excessive crying in young infants – colic – has been elusive. A study of mothers with new infants suggests that more crying is associated with more negative emotions towards the infant, and perceptions of poorer infant health. These results undermine the hypothesis that excessive crying is an honest signal of vigor.
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  37. Elena Longhi & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2004). In the Beginning Was the Song: The Complex Multimodal Timing of Mother-Infant Musical Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):516-517.score: 18.0
    In this commentary we raise three issues: (1) Is it motherese or song that sets the stage for very early mother-infant interaction? (2) Does the infant play a pivotal role in the complex temporal structure of social interaction? (3) Is the vocal channel primordial or do other modalities play an equally important role in social interaction?
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  38. Stein Braten (2004). Hominin Infant Decentration Hypothesis: Mirror Neurons System Adapted to Subserve Mother-Centered Participation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):508-509.score: 18.0
    Falk's hominin mother-infant model presupposes an emerging infant capacity to perceive and learn from afforded gestures and vocalizations. Unlike back-riding offspring of other primates, who were in no need to decenter their own body-centered perspective, a mirror neurons system may have been adapted in hominin infants to subserve the kind of (m)other-centered mirroring we now see manifested by human infants soon after birth.
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  39. Joseph Soltis (2004). The Developmental Mechanisms and the Signal Functions of Early Infant Crying. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):477-484.score: 18.0
    The majority of the commentaries focused on excessive crying and colic and included two major themes: the consideration of proximate physiological mechanisms, and challenges to my interpretation of the signal functions of early infant crying amount. I initially concluded that none of the competing signaling hypotheses enjoyed strong support, but I nevertheless favored the signaling vigor hypothesis above the signaling need and manipulation hypotheses. Consideration of the neurobiological causation of the n-shaped crying curve and further evidence and argumentation concerning (...)
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  40. Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.) (2004). Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    This volume provides an authoritative, up-to-date survey of theories of infant development.
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  41. Barbara J. King & Stuart Shanker (2004). Beyond Prosody and Infant-Directed Speech: Affective, Social Construction of Meaning in the Origins of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):515-515.score: 18.0
    Our starting point for the origins of language goes beyond prosody or infant-directed speech to highlight the affective, multimodal, and co-constructed nature of meaning-making that was likely present before the split between African great apes and hominins. Analysis of vocal and gestural caregiving practices in hominins, and of meaning-making via gestural interaction in African great apes, supports our thesis.
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  42. James Edward Swain, Linda C. Mayes & James F. Leckman (2004). The Development of Parent-Infant Attachment Through Dynamic and Interactive Signaling Loops of Care and Cry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):472-473.score: 18.0
    In addition to the infant cry being a signal for attention, it may also be a critical component of the early formation of attachments with caregivers. We consider the complex development of that attachment, which involves reciprocal interactive signaling and a host of evolutionarily conserved caregiver factors.
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  43. David Basinger (1999). Infant Suffering: A Response to Chignell. Religious Studies 35 (3):363-369.score: 18.0
    In a recent article in this journal Andrew Chignell assesses attempts by Marilyn McCord Adams and Eleonore Stump to resolve the problem that infant suffering poses for theistic belief, concluding that while the theodicy of each is inadequate in its current form, both can be satisfactorily amended. I argue that (1) Chignell fails to show that the theodicy of either Adams or Stump is inadequate and that (2) since Chignell's revisions are based on assumptions about God and evil held (...)
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  44. Sarah E. Berger (2001). Accounting for Infant Perseveration Beyond the Manual Search Task. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):34-35.score: 18.0
    Although the dynamic field model predicts infants' perseverative behavior in the context of the A-not-B manual search task, it does not account for infant perseveration in other contexts. An alternative cognitive capacity explanation for perseveration is more parsimonious. It accounts for the graded nature of perseverative responses and perseveration in different contexts.
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  45. Yoke Munakata, Sarah Devi Sahni & Benjamin E. Yerys (2001). An Embodied Theory in Search of a Body: Challenges for a Dynamic Systems Model of Infant Perseveration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):56-57.score: 18.0
    In this commentary, we question (1) how embodied Thelen et al.'s model is relative to their aims, and (2) how embodied the behavior of children is in particular response systems, relative to how much dynamic systems theory emphasizes this idea. We close with corrections to mischaracterizations of an alternative, neural network perspective on infant behavior.
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  46. J. E. Riggs & G. R. Hobbs (2011). Infant Homicide and Accidental Death in the United States, 1940-2005: Ethics and Epidemiological Classification. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (7):445-448.score: 18.0
    Potential ethical issues can arise during the process of epidemiological classification. For example, unnatural infant deaths are classified as accidental deaths or homicides. Societal sensitivity to the physical abuse and neglect of children has increased over recent decades. This enhanced sensitivity could impact reported infant homicide rates. Infant homicide and accident mortality rates in boys and girls in the USA from 1940 to 2005 were analysed. In 1940, infant accident mortality rates were over 20 times greater (...)
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  47. James Edward Swain, Linda C. Mayes & James F. Leckman (2005). Endogenous and Exogenous Opiates Modulate the Development of Parent–Infant Attachment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):364-365.score: 18.0
    In addition to endogenously produced opiates, which are part of normal affiliative neurocircuitry and attachment formation, exogenous opiates – such as drugs of addiction and abuse – may affect affiliation. We consider possible modulatory effects of such exogenous opiates on the development of early parent–infant attachment from both parents' and infants' perspectives.
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  48. Eliyahu Ungar-Sargon (forthcoming). On the Impermissibility of Infant Male Circumcision: A Response to Mazor (2013). Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101598.score: 18.0
    This is a response to Dr Joseph Mazor’s paper ‘The child's interests and the case for the permissibility of male infant circumcision.’ I argue that Dr Mazor fails to prove that bodily integrity and self-determination are mere interests as opposed to genuine rights in the case of infant male circumcision. Moreover, I cast doubt on the interest calculus that Dr Mazor employs to arrive at his conclusions about circumcision.
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  49. Alexis Bosseler, Samu Taulu, Elina Pihko, Jyrki Mäkelä, Toshiaki Imada, Antti Ahonen & Patricia Kuhl (2013). Theta Brain Rhythms Index Perceptual Narrowing in Infant Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants’ initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the worlds’ languages narrows—native discrimination increases while nonnative discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8Hz), reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech stimuli (...)
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  50. Hillary N. Fouts, Michael E. Lamb & Barry S. Hewlett (2004). Infant Crying in Hunter-Gatherer Cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):462-463.score: 18.0
    By synthesizing evolutionary, attachment, and acoustic perspectives, Soltis has provided an innovative model of infant cry acoustics and parental responsiveness. We question some of his hypotheses, however, because of the limited extant data on infant crying among hunter-gatherers. We also question Soltis' distinction between manipulative and honest signaling based upon recent contributions from attachment theory.
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