Search results for 'Infertility congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Zbigniew Bańkowski, J. Barzelatto & Alexander Morgan Capron (eds.) (1989). Ethics and Human Values in Family Planning: Conference Highlights, Papers, and Discussion: Xxii Cioms Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, 19-24 June 1988. [REVIEW] Cioms.
     
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  2. Annual Congresses (forthcoming). ERS Annual Congress Barcelona 2010. Hermes.
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  3.  2
    Anna Smajdor & Daniela Cutas (2015). Will Artificial Gametes End Infertility? Health Care Analysis 23 (2):134-147.
    In this paper we will look at the various ways in which infertility can be understood and at how need for reproductive therapies can be construed. We will do this against the background of research with artificial gametes. Having explored these questions we will attempt to establish the degree to which technologies such as AGs could expand the array of choices that people have to reproduce and/or become parents. Finally, we will examine whether and in what ways the most (...)
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  4.  4
    Samuel K. Wasser (1994). Psychosocial Stress and Infertility. Human Nature 5 (3):293-306.
    Experimental, theoretical, psychological, and economic barriers have caused physicians to rely on biomedical treatments for infertility at the exclusion of more environmentally oriented ones (e.g., psychosocial stress therapy). An evolutionary model is described for the origin of reproductive failure, suggesting why mammals evolved to be reproductively responsive to the environment and why psychosocial stress should have an especially strong impact on fertility problems. A study of the causal role of psychosocial stress in infertility is then summarized. The paper (...)
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  5.  2
    Samuel K. Wasser (1990). Infertility, Abortion, and Biotechnology. Human Nature 1 (1):3-24.
    Patterns of reproductive failure described in humans and other mammals suggest that reproductive failure may in many instances be the result of adaptations evolved to suppress reproduction under temporarily harsh conditions. By suppressing reproduction under such conditions, females are able to conserve their time and energy for reproductive opportunities in which reproduction is most likely to succeed. Such adaptations have been particularly important for female mammals, given (a) the amount of time and energy that reproduction requires, and (b) the degree (...)
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  6.  2
    Scott Wilkes, Nicola Hall, Ann Crosland, Alison Murdoch & Greg Rubin (2007). General Practitioners' Perceptions and Attitudes to Infertility Management in Primary Care: Focus Group Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (3):358-363.
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  7. Marie-Eve Lemoine & Vardit Ravitsky (2013). Toward a Public Health Approach to Infertility: The Ethical Dimensions of Infertility Prevention. Public Health Ethics 6 (3):pht026.
    While many experts and organizations have recognized infertility as a public health issue, most governments have not yet adopted a public health approach to infertility. This article argues in favor of such an approach by discussing the various implications of infertility for public health. We use a conceptual framework that focuses on the dual meaning of the term ‘public’ in this context: the health of the public, as opposed to that of individuals, and the public/collective nature of (...)
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  8.  5
    Marie-Eve Lemoine & Vardit Ravitsky (2015). Sleepwalking Into Infertility: The Need for a Public Health Approach Toward Advanced Maternal Age. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (11):37-48.
    In Western countries today, a growing number of women delay motherhood until their late 30s and even 40s, as they invest time in pursuing education and career goals before starting a family. This social trend results from greater gender equality and expanded opportunities for women and is influenced by the availability of contraception and assisted reproductive technologies. However, advanced maternal age is associated with increased health risks, including infertility. While individual medical solutions such as ART and elective egg freezing (...)
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  9.  4
    Brian Bocking (2013). Flagging Up Buddhism: Charles Pfoundes (Omoie Tetzunostzuke) Among the International Congresses and Expositions, 1893–1905. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):17-37.
    Charles James William Pfoundes (1840?1907), a young emigrant from Southeast Ireland, spent most of his adult life in Japan, received a Japanese name ?Omoie Tetzunostzuke?, first embraced and then turned against Theosophy and, from 1893, was ordained in several Japanese Buddhist traditions. Lacking independent means but educated, intellectually curious, entrepreneurial, fluent in Japanese and with a keen interest in Asian culture, Pfoundes subsisted as a cultural intermediary, explaining Japan and Asia to both Japanese and foreign audiences and actively seeking involvement (...)
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  10.  22
    Carson Strong (1998). Cloning and Infertility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):279-293.
    Although there are important moral arguments against cloning human beings, it has been suggested that there might be exceptional cases in which cloning humans would be ethically permissible. One type of supposed exceptional case involves infertile couples who want to have children by cloning. This paper explores whether cloning would be ethically permissible in infertility cases and the separate question of whether we should have a policy allowing cloning in such cases. One caveat should be stated at the beginning, (...)
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  11.  4
    Rebecca C. H. Brown, Wendy A. Rogers, Vikki A. Entwistle & Siladitya Bhattacharya (forthcoming). Reframing the Debate Around State Responses to Infertility: Considering the Harms of Subfertility and Involuntary Childlessness. Public Health Ethics:phw005.
    Many countries are experiencing increasing levels of demand for access to assisted reproductive technologies. Policies regarding who can access ART and with what support from a collective purse are highly contested, raising questions about what state responses are justified. Whilst much of this debate has focused on the status of infertility as a disease, we argue that this is something of a distraction, since disease framing does not provide the far-reaching, robust justification for state support that proponents of ART (...)
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  12.  54
    L. Frith (2009). Use or Ornament? Clinical Ethics Committees in Infertility Units: A Qualitative Study. Clinical Ethics 4 (2):91-97.
    This paper examines the role of clinical ethics committees (CECs) in infertility clinics in the UK, focusing on whether they usefully support infertility clinicians' ethical decision-making. The overall aim of the study reported here was to investigate how infertility clinicians approached and handled ethical problems in their everyday practice and this paper reports on one aspect of these data – what they thought about the use of CECs. This paper gives an overview of what arrangements there are (...)
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  13.  18
    Carolyn McLeod & Julie Ponesse (2008). Infertility and Moral Luck: The Politics of Women Blaming Themselves for Infertility. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):126 - 144.
    Infertility can be an agonizing experience, especially for women. And, much of the agony has to do with luck: with how unlucky one is in being infertile, and in how much luck is involved in determining whether one can weather the storm of infertility and perhaps have a child in the end. We argue that bad luck associated with being infertile is often bad moral luck for women. The infertile woman often blames herself or is blamed by others (...)
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  14.  17
    Maren Klawiter (1990). Using Arendt and Heidegger to Consider Feminist Thinking on Women and Reproductive / Infertility Technologies. Hypatia 5 (3):65 - 89.
    Modern technology and gender relations are deeply intertwined. There has yet to emerge, however, a feminist analysis of modern technology as a phenomenon and this has inhibited the development of a consistent feminist response and theory regarding infertility/reproductive technologies. After taking a look at the character of the ongoing debate surrounding reproductive/infertility technologies, this paper considers how the contributions of Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger might add some further insight to the debate and aid in the effort to (...)
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  15.  25
    Serap Sahinoglu & Nuket Buken (2010). Gender, Infertility, Motherhood, and Assisted Reproductive Technology in Turkey. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (2):218-232.
    In Turkey, as in many other countries, infertility is generally regarded as a negative phenomenon in a woman’s life and is associated with a lot of stigma by society. In other words, female infertility and having a baby using Assisted Reproductive Technologies have to be taken into consideration with respect to gender, motherhood, social factors, religion and law. Yet if a woman chooses to use ART she has to deal with the consequences of her decision, such as being (...)
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  16.  9
    Florencia Luna & Allison B. Wolf (2014). Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):3-27.
    … and the feminists understand perfectly that infertility carries a heavy burden for women. However, they have ambivalent feelings in relation to supporting them in their search for treatments that will resolve their infertility because they feel as if they would be contributing to reinforcing traditional gender roles. It is this tension that has strongly framed the relationship between those who are in favor of these assisted reproductive technologies … and feminists[.]In this essay, I want to explore a (...)
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  17.  27
    Lee M. Silver (1990). New Reproductive Technologies in the Treatment of Human Infertility and Genetic Disease. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).
    In this paper I will discuss three areas in which advances in human reproductive technology could occur, their uses and abuses, and their effects on society. First is the potential to drastically increase the success rate and availability of in vitro fertilization and embryo freezing. Second is the ability to perform biopsies on embryos prior to the onset of pregnancy. Finally, I will consider the adding or altering of genes in embryos, commonly referred to as genetic engineering.As new reproductive technologies (...)
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  18.  7
    Allison B. Wolf (2014). Lessons From Latin America: A Commentary of Florencia Luna, "Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America". International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):28-34.
    Florencia Luna begins her essay, “Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America,” by saying: “I want to explore a new way to think about Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in the Latin American context.” I think she clearly achieves that objective. I want to suggest that she does more than this, however. In addition to revealing how traditional depictions of infertility in the United States and Europe are anachronistic for Latin America, her analysis offers feminist bioethicists (...)
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  19.  12
    Daniel Basco, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez (2010). Insuring Against Infertility: Expanding State Infertility Mandates to Include Fertility Preservation Technology for Cancer Patients. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (4):832-839.
    In this paper, we recommend expanding infertility insurance mandates to people who may become infertile because of cancer treatments. Such an expansion would ensure cancer patients can receive fertility preservation technology (FPT) prior to commencing treatment. We base our proposal for extending coverage to cancer patients on the infertility mandate in Massachusetts because it is one of the most inclusive. While we use Massachusetts as a model, our arguments and analysis of possible routes to coverage can be applied (...)
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  20.  14
    Susan M. Purviance (1995). Infertility Treatment for Postmenopausal Patients: An Equity-Based Approach. Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):15 – 24.
    This article examines two questions pertaining to the extension of infertility treatment to postmenopausal women. First, what concepts and principles of infertility practice apply to assisted reproduction for the postmenopausal patient? Second, what role should these concepts play in the development of an ethical justification for extending women's reproductive lives past the menopausal boundary? The argument offered here supports their claim to infertility services on the basis of the formal principle of justice, which requires that similar cases (...)
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  21.  4
    Kimberley Pfeiffer (2012). Exploiting Infertility Vs. Natural Procreative Medicine. Bioethics Research Notes 24 (2):28.
    Pfeiffer, Kimberley We've heard it happening more than once. A couple uses IVF to fall pregnant then later down the track they conceive naturally. Confusing, right? Aren't they supposed to be infertile? Isn't that why people request this invasive and expensive procedure in the first place? Well, a recent study shows that more than 40% of women aged between 28 and 36 years that report having a history of infertility achieved subsequent births without using any form of reproductive assistance1. (...)
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  22.  6
    Kavita Shah & Frances Batzer (2010). Infertility in the Developing World: The Combined Role for Feminists and Disability Rights Proponents. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):109-125.
    Many of the millions of women in the developed world who experience infertility have difficulty coping with its psychological and social consequences, as well as attaining a resolution to these potentially devastating effects. Nevertheless, these women enjoy a relative benefit vis-à-vis infertile women in the developing world insofar as they live in a society that does not force them out of their own houses, curse at them in the streets, or condemn them to a life of poverty and destitution (...)
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  23.  7
    Kavita R. Shah (2010). Selecting Barrenness: The Use of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis by Congenitally Infertile Women to Select for Infertility. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):7-21.
    Congenitally infertile woman such as those with Turner syndrome or Mayer Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome have available the technologies of oocyte harvestation, cryropreservation, in-vitro fertilization, and gestational surrogacy in order to have genetically related offspring. Since congenital infertility results in a variety of experiences that impacts on nearly every aspect of a person’s life, in the future it is possible that these women might desire a congenitally infertile child through the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis so as to share this common (...)
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  24.  3
    L. Frith (2009). Process and Consensus: Ethical Decision-Making in the Infertility Clinic--A Qualitative Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):662-667.
    Infertility treatment is a speciality that has attracted considerable attention both from the public and bioethicists. The focus of this attention has mainly been on the dramatic dilemmas created by theses technologies. Relatively little is known, however, about how clinicians approach and resolve ethical issues on an everyday basis. The central aim of this study is to gain insight into these neglected aspects of practice. It was found that, for the clinicians, the process by which ethical decisions were made (...)
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  25.  2
    A. Dembinska (2012). Bioethical Dilemmas of Assisted Reproduction in the Opinions of Polish Women in Infertility Treatment: A Research Report. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):731-734.
    Infertility Accepted treatment is replete with bioethical dilemmas regarding the limits of available medical therapies. Poland has no legal acts regulating the ethical problems associated with infertility treatment and work on such legislation has been in progress for a long time, arousing very intense emotions in Polish society. The purpose of the present study was to find out what Polish women undergoing infertility treatment think about the most disputable and controversial bioethical problems of assisted reproduction. An Attitudes (...)
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  26.  6
    Sheryl de Lacey (2002). IVF as Lottery or Investment: Contesting Metaphors in Discourses of Infertility. Nursing Inquiry 9 (1):43-51.
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  27.  2
    Allison Marziliano & Anne Moyer (2013). An Additional Consideration Regarding Expanding Access to Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation: Infertility and Social Stigma. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):48 - 50.
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  28.  5
    Laurie Essig (forthcoming). Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity. Medical Humanities:medhum-2015-010716.
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  29.  1
    Helen Allan (2007). Experiences of Infertility: Liminality and the Role of the Fertility Clinic. Nursing Inquiry 14 (2):132-139.
  30.  58
    Becky Cox White (1989). Overview of the Ota Report Infertility: Medical and Social Choices. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (5):493-496.
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  31.  3
    Judith C. Daniluk (2015). “Sleepwalking Into Infertility”: The Need for a Gentle Wake-Up Call. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (11):52-54.
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  32.  8
    Carolyn McLeod (2005). Embryo Autonomy? What About the Autonomy of Infertility Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):25 – 26.
    A review of S. M. Liao's "Rescuing human embryonic stem cell research: The blastocyst transfer method," American Journal of Bioethics 5(6), 2005: 8:16.
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  33.  7
    Cecil Ib Voge (1933). Natural Infertility: Factors Influencing the Results of Contraceptive Methods. The Eugenics Review 25 (2):85.
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  34.  4
    Judith Lorber (1989). Choice, Gift, or Patriarchal Bargain? Women's Consent to In Vitro Fertilization in Male Infertility. Hypatia 4 (3):23-36.
  35.  5
    Margarete Sandelowski (1990). Fault Lines: Infertility and Imperiled Sisterhood. Feminist Studies 16 (1):33-51.
  36.  7
    Richard F. . Storrow (2011). The Ethics of Exclusion in Infertility Care. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (4).
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  37.  1
    Michelle K. Goldberg (2004). Improving Fairness in Coverage Decisions: An Application of the Ethical Force Program's Recommendations on Infertility Treatment. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):106-108.
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  38.  10
    Theodore Stanton (1895). A French View of the Chicago Congresses. The Monist 6 (1):131-134.
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  39.  27
    Jacob M. Appel (2006). May Doctors Refuse Infertility Treatments to Gay Patients? Hastings Center Report 36 (4):20-21.
  40.  2
    Jacek Z. Kubiak & Martin H. Johnson (2001). Human Infertility, Reproductive Cloning and Nuclear Transfer: A Confusion of Meanings. Bioessays 23 (4):359-364.
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  41.  2
    L. Serene Jones (2001). Hope Deferred: Theological Reflections on Reproductive Loss (Infertility, Stillbirth, Miscarriage). Modern Theology 17 (2):227-245.
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  42.  8
    Mariusz Giero & Robert Milewski (2009). Storing and Retrieving Information on the Treatment of Infertility with the Use of the Bitemporal Database and Temporal Logic. In Dariusz Surowik (ed.), Logic in Knowledge Representation and Exploration. University of Białystok 213.
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  43.  19
    Judith Lorber (1989). Choice, Gift, or Patriarchal Bargain? Women's Consent to in Vitro Fertilization in Male Infertility. Hypatia 4 (3):23 - 36.
    This paper explores the reasons why women who are themselves fertile might consent to undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) with an infertile male partner. The reasons often given are desire to have that particular man's child, or altruism, giving a gift to the partner. Although ethically, the decision should be completely woman's prerogative, because IVF programs usually treat the couple as a unit, she may be offered few other options by the medical staff. In social terms, whether the woman is (...)
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  44.  2
    Maren Klawiter (1990). Using Arendt and Heidegger to Consider Feminist Thinking on Women and Reproductive/ Infertility Technologies. Hypatia 5 (3):65-89.
  45.  7
    Ulrich Dierse (1985). Bibliography of the International Congresses of Philosophy. Proceedings. Philosophy and History 18 (1):6-6.
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  46.  4
    Herbert W. Schneider (1948). International Congresses and the International Federation of Philosophical Societies. Journal of Philosophy 45 (23):636-643.
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  47.  2
    C. Richie (2014). Reading Between the Lines: Infertility and Current Health Insurance Policies in the US. Clinical Ethics 9 (4):127-134.
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  48.  5
    Paul G. Kuntz (1969). The Past and Future of International Congresses. International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (1):120-133.
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  49.  5
    Winnifred B. Cutler, Celso-Ramon García & Abba M. Krieger (1979). Infertility and Age at First Coitus: A Possible Relationship. Journal of Biosocial Science 11 (4):425.
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  50.  1
    Marie-Eve Lemoine & Vardit Ravitsky (2015). Public Health and Advanced Maternal Age: An Imperfect but Justified Marriage. Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Sleepwalking Into Infertility: The Need for a Public Health Approach Toward Advanced Maternal Age”. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):1-5.
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