Search results for 'Informed Consent ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hillel Braude & Jonathan Kimmelman (2012). The Ethics of Managing Affective and Emotional States to Improve Informed Consent: Autonomy, Comprehension, and Voluntariness. Bioethics 26 (3):149-156.score: 606.0
    Over the past several decades the ‘affective revolution’ in cognitive psychology has emphasized the critical role affect and emotion play in human decision-making. Drawing on this affective literature, various commentators have recently proposed strategies for managing therapeutic expectation that use contextual, symbolic, or emotive interventions in the consent process to convey information or enhance comprehension. In this paper, we examine whether affective consent interventions that target affect and emotion can be reconciled with widely accepted standards for autonomous action. (...)
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  2. Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.score: 606.0
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his (...)
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  3. Franklin G. Miller & Luana Colloca (2011). The Placebo Phenomenon and Medical Ethics: Rethinking the Relationship Between Informed Consent and Risk–Benefit Assessment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):229-243.score: 561.0
    It has been presumed within bioethics that the benefits and risks of treatments can be assessed independently of information disclosure to patients as part of the informed consent process. Research on placebo and nocebo effects indicates that this is not true for symptomatic treatments. The benefits and risks that patients experience from symptomatic treatments can be shaped powerfully by information about these treatments provided by clinicians. In this paper we discuss the implications of placebo and nocebo research for (...)
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  4. Martin Tolich (2009). The Principle of Caveat Emptor: Confidentiality and Informed Consent as Endemic Ethical Dilemmas in Focus Group Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):99-108.score: 552.0
    Informed consent and confidentiality supposedly minimize harm for research participants in all qualitative research methodologies, inclusive of one-on-one unstructured interviews and focus groups. This is not the case for the latter. Confidentiality and informed consent uniquely manifest themselves as endemic ethical dilemmas for focus group researchers. The principle of caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) may be a more useful tool for those involved in focus group research: that is, let the researcher, the participants and the (...)
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  5. Kevin C. Elliott (2006). An Ethics of Expertise Based on Informed Consent. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.score: 549.0
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based (...)
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  6. Athula Sumathipala, Sisira Siribaddana, Suwin Hewage, Manura Lekamwattage, Manjula Athukorale, Chesmal Siriwardhana, Joanna Murray & Martin Prince (2008). Informed Consent in Sri Lanka: A Survey Among Ethics Committee Members. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):10-.score: 531.0
    BackgroundApproval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research.However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form.MethodsWe obtained ethical approval from UK and Sri Lanka. (...)
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  7. Juergen Simon (2005). Some Ethical and Legal Issues in Germany Involving Informed Consent and Patenting. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):93-96.score: 525.0
    This paper elaborates on discussions in Germany regarding some of the ethical and legal issues in the area of the use and patenting of inventions involving human tissue. The issues discussed pertain to the benefits and problems regarding informed consent and the issue of property rights as they relate to the donation of cells and tissue.
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  8. Shawn Fabrice Jotterand, Archie M. McClintock, Mustafa A. Alexander & M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (Vns) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (Trd). Neuroethics 3 (1).score: 522.0
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his (...)
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  9. I. M. Kaufmann & F. J. Ruhli (2010). Without 'Informed Consent'? Ethics and Ancient Mummy Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (10):608-613.score: 516.0
    Ethical issues are of foremost importance in modern bio-medical science. Ethical guidelines and socio-cultural public awareness exist for modern samples, whereas for ancient mummy studies both are de facto lacking. This is particularly striking considering the fact that examinations are done without informed consent or that the investigations are invasive due to technological aspects and that it affects personality traits. The aim of this study is to show the pro and contra arguments of ancient mummy research from an (...)
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  10. Athula Sumathipala, Sisira Siribaddana, Suwin Hewege, Manura Lekamwattage, Manjula Athukorale, Chesmal Siriwardhana, Joanna Murray & Martin Prince (2008). Ethics Review Committee Approval and Informed Consent: An Analysis of Biomedical Publications Originating From Sri Lanka. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):3-.score: 501.0
    BackgroundInternational guidelines on research have focused on protecting research participants. Ethical Research Committee (ERC) approval and informed consent are the cornerstones. Externally sponsored research requires approval through ethical review in both the host and the sponsoring country. This study aimed to determine to what extent ERC approval and informed consent procedures are documented in locally and internationally published human subject research carried out in Sri Lanka.MethodsWe obtained ERC approval in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom. Theses (...)
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  11. Irene Pollach (2005). A Typology of Communicative Strategies in Online Privacy Policies: Ethics, Power and Informed Consent. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):221 - 235.score: 492.0
    The opaque use of data collection methods on the WWW has given rise to privacy concerns among Internet users. Privacy policies on websites may ease these concerns, if they communicate clearly and unequivocally when, how and for what purpose data are collected, used or shared. This paper examines privacy policies from a linguistic angle to determine whether the language of these documents is adequate for communicating data-handling practices in a manner that enables informed consent on the part of (...)
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  12. V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux (2009). Experiences with Community Engagement and Informed Consent in a Genetic Cohort Study of Severe Childhood Diseases in Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.score: 486.0
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing (...)
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  13. Sven Ove Hansson (2006). Informed Consent Out of Context. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):149 - 154.score: 480.0
    Several attempts have been made to transfer the concept of informed consent from medical and research ethics to dealing with affected groups in other areas such as engineering, land use planning, and business management. It is argued that these attempts are unsuccessful since the concept of informed consent is inadequate for situations in which groups of affected persons are dealt with collectively (rather than individually, as in clinical medicine). There are several reasons for this. The (...)
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  14. Adnan Qureshi & Amer Johri (2008). Issues Involving Informed Consent for Research Participants with Alzheimer's Disease. Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):197-203.score: 480.0
    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia which is estimated to impact 350,000 people over 65 years of age in Canada. The lack of effective treatment and the growing number of people who are expected to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the near future are compelling reasons why continued research is in this area is necessary. With additional research, there needs to be greater recognition of the complexity of seeking ongoing informed consent from those with (...)
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  15. Keith Miller (1998). Software Informed Consent: Docete Emptorem, Not Caveat Emptor. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):357-362.score: 480.0
    Should software be sold “as is”, totally guaranteed, or something else? This paper suggests that “informed consent”, used extensively in medical ethics, is an appropriate way to envision the buyer/developer relationship when software is sold. We review why the technical difficulties preclude delivering perfect software, but allow statistical predictions about reliability. Then we borrow principles refined by medical ethics and apply them to computer professionals.
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  16. Ayodele S. Jegede (2009). Understanding Informed Consent for Participation in International Health Research. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):81-87.score: 471.0
    To participate in health research, there is a need for well-administered informed consent. Understanding of informed consent, especially in international health research, is influenced by the participants' understanding of information and the meaning attached to the information communicated to them regarding the purpose and procedure of the research. Incorrect information and the power differential between researcher and participants may lead to participants becoming victims of harmful research procedures. Meningitis epidemics in Kano in early 1996 led to (...)
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  17. Asya Al-Riyami, Deepali Jaju, Sanjay Jaju & Henry J. Silverman (2011). The Adequacy of Informed Consent Forms in Genetic Research in Oman: A Pilot Study. Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):57-62.score: 471.0
    Genetic research presents ethical challenges to the achievement of valid informed consent, especially in developing countries with areas of low literacy. During the last several years, a number of genetic research proposals involving Omani nationals were submitted to the Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Oman.The objective of this paper is to report on the results of an internal quality assurance initiative to determine the extent of the information being provided in genetic research informed (...) forms. In order to achieve this, we developed checklists to assess the inclusion of basic elements of informed consent as well as elements related to the collection and future storage of biological samples. Three of the authors independently evaluated and reached consensus on seven informed consent forms that were available for review.Of the seven consent forms, four had less than half of the basic elements of informed consent. None contained any information regarding whether genetic information relevant to health would be disclosed, whether participants may share in commercial products, the extent of confidentiality protections, and the inclusion of additional consent forms for future storage and use of tissue samples. Information regarding genetic risks and withdrawal of samples were rarely mentioned (1/7), whereas limits on future use of samples were mentioned in 3 of 7 consent forms.Ultimately, consent forms are not likely to address key issues regarding genetic research that have been recommended by research ethics guidelines. We recommend enhanced educational efforts to increase awareness, on the part of researchers, of information that should be included in consent forms. (shrink)
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  18. Ben Almassi (2014). Medical Ghostwriting and Informed Consent. Bioethics 28 (9):491-499.score: 471.0
    Ghostwriting in its various forms has received critical scrutiny from medical ethicists, journal editors, and science studies scholars trying to explain where ghostwriting goes wrong and ascertain how to counter it. Recent analyses have characterized ghostwriting as plagiarism or fraud, and have urged that it be deterred through stricter compliance with journal submission requirements, conflict of interest disclosures, author-institutional censure, legal remedies, and journals' refusal to publish commercially sponsored articles. As a supplement to such efforts, this paper offers a critical (...)
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  19. Sigurdur Kristinsson (2007). Autonomy and Informed Consent: A Mistaken Association? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):253-264.score: 471.0
    For decades, the greater part of efforts to improve regulatory frameworks for research ethics has focused on informed consent procedures; their design, codification and regulation. Why is informed consent thought to be so important? Since the publication of the Belmont Report in 1979, the standard response has been that obtaining informed consent is a way of treating individuals as autonomous agents. Despite its political success, the philosophical validity of this Belmont view cannot be (...)
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  20. Wayne Xavier Shandera (2013). Can Our Understanding of Informed Consent Be Strengthened Using the Idea of Cluster Concepts? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):679-682.score: 471.0
    Informed consent is thought to exist as a well-defined entity. Altered concepts of patient autonomy, differential cultural understanding of the entity, and the failure of clients to distinguish between research and clinical ethics, and various hierarchical cultural views of informed consent all suggest that alterations may be needed in the traditional concept. By using the methodology outlined by Gasking in which he defines the idea of “cluster concepts,” one may be able to enlarge the definition (...)
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  21. Abraham R. Oduro, Raymond A. Aborigo, Dickson Amugsi, Francis Anto, Thomas Anyorigiya, Frank Atuguba, Abraham Hodgson & Kwadwo A. Koram (2008). Understanding and Retention of the Informed Consent Process Among Parents in Rural Northern Ghana. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):12-.score: 456.0
    The individual informed consent model remains critical to the ethical conduct and regulation of research involving human beings. Parental informed consent process in a rural setting of northern Ghana was studied to describe comprehension and retention among parents as part of the evaluation of the existing informed consent process.
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  22. Deborah Yeager-Woodhouse & John Sivell (2006). Prepackaged Tour Versus Personal Journey: The Meaning of Informed Consent in the Context of the Teacher-Study Group. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):189-203.score: 450.0
    This article discusses the specific ethical dilemma of obtaining informed consent and ensuring confidentiality and participant well-being while conducting a qualitative research study with novice ESL teachers in a Teacher Study Group. The discussion outlines their process of resolution of the ambiguities inherent in the research process – in essence the researchers’ personal journey of discovery. The article concludes with the broader implications for making the research process more transparent for other academic researchers working in the field of (...)
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  23. R. Nakkash, J. Makhoul & R. Afifi (2009). Obtaining Informed Consent: Observations From Community Research with Refugee and Impoverished Youth. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):638-643.score: 450.0
    This paper presents challenges facing researchers in applying basic ethical principles while conducting research with youth in a developing country context. A discussion of the cultural and social challenges to adherence to the elements of informed consent: disclosure, comprehension, capacity, voluntariness and consent is presented. The authors argue that the current institutional review board requirements that guide research reflect values and stem from western contexts that may not be fully applicable to non-western contexts. More dialogue is needed (...)
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  24. Rachel Vreeman, Eunice Kamaara, Allan Kamanda, David Ayuku, Winstone Nyandiko, Lukoye Atwoli, Samuel Ayaya, Peter Gisore, Michael Scanlon & Paula Braitstein (2012). A Qualitative Study Using Traditional Community Assemblies to Investigate Community Perspectives on Informed Consent and Research Participation in Western Kenya. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):23-.score: 450.0
    Background International collaborators face challenges in the design and implementation of ethical biomedical research. Evaluating community understanding of research and processes like informed consent may enable researchers to better protect research participants in a particular setting; however, there exist few studies examining community perspectives in health research, particularly in resource-limited settings, or strategies for engaging the community in research processes. Our goal was to inform ethical research practice in a biomedical research setting in western Kenya and similar resource-limited (...)
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  25. D. K. Sokol (2005). Commentary on Ethics of HIV Testing in General Practice Without Informed Consent: A Case Series. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (12):701-702.score: 444.0
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  26. Linda Farber Post, Jeffrey Blustein, Elysa Gordon & Nancy Neveloff Dubler (1996). Pain: Ethics, Culture, and Informed Consent to Relief. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (4):348-359.score: 444.0
  27. G. Adshead (1999). Informed Consent in Psychiatry: European Perspectives of Ethics, Law and Clinical Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):428-429.score: 444.0
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  28. Abbey L. Berg, A. Herb & M. Hurst (2005). Cochlear Implants in Children: Ethics, Informed Consent, and Parental Decision Making. Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (3):239.score: 444.0
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  29. George R. Hoffmann (2007). Letter to the Editor on Ethics of Expertise, Informed Consent, and Hormesis. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):135-137.score: 444.0
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  30. K. A. Finlay & C. V. Fernandez (2008). Failure to Report and Provide Commentary on Research Ethics Board Approval and Informed Consent in Medical Journals. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (10):761-764.score: 444.0
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  31. D. Raymond (1986). AIDS, HIV Testing, and the Ethics of Informed Consent. Ethics and Medicine: A Christian Perspective on Issues in Bioethics 3 (1):9-15.score: 444.0
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  32. Don Chalmers & Robert Schwartz (1993). Malpractice Liability for the Failure to Adequately Educate Patients: The Australian Law of “Informed Consent” and Its Implications for American Ethics Committees. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (03):371-.score: 444.0
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  33. P. Fisher (2012). Questioning the Ethics of Vulnerability and Informed Consent in Qualitative Studies From a Citizenship and Human Rights Perspective. Ethics and Social Welfare 6:2-17.score: 444.0
  34. J. Fraser (2005). Ethics of HIV Testing in General Practice Without Informed Consent: A Case Series. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (12):698-702.score: 444.0
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  35. J. Ames & M. Thurston (2008). Trials and Treatments: Some Reflections on Informed Consent and the Role of Research Ethics Committees. Research Ethics 4 (3):95-100.score: 444.0
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  36. Randall Horton & Howard Brody (2012). Informed Consent, Shared Decision-Making, and the Ethics Committee. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.score: 444.0
     
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  37. J. F. Meschia (2003). Reporting of Informed Consent and Ethics Committee Approval in Genetics Studies of Stroke. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):371-a-372.score: 444.0
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  38. Paul B. Hofmann, William Nelson, Neal Cohen & Robert L. Schwartz (1996). Ethics Committees at Work: Physician Experience as a Measure of Competency: Implications for Informed Consent. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (03):458-.score: 444.0
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  39. D. Sarin, Brij B. Agarwal & B. K. Rao (2007). Ethics for Surgeons: The Role of Trainees, Surgical Innovations and the Informed Consent. In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press. 20--3.score: 444.0
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  40. Judith W. Spain (2003). Sell Global, Pay Local—The Ethics of Taller Product Markets, Lower Labor Markets, and Informed Consent in Global Employment Contracts. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 22 (4):25-41.score: 444.0
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  41. Spike Jr (2012). Anesthesiological Ethics: Can Informed Consent Be Implied? Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):68.score: 444.0
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  42. Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno (1994). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.score: 441.0
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received (...)
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  43. Gabriela Marodin, Paulo Henrique Condeixa de França, Jennifer Braathen Salgueiro, Marcia Luz da Motta, Gysélle Saddi Tannous & Anibal Gil Lopes (2012). Alternatives of Informed Consent for Storage and Use of Human Biological Material for Research Purposes: Brazilian Regulation. Developing World Bioethics 12 (3).score: 441.0
    Informed consent is recognized as a primary ethical requirement to conduct research involving humans. In the investigations with the use of human biological material, informed consent (IC) assumes a differentiated condition on account of the many future possibilities. This work presents suitable alternatives for IC regarding the storage and use of human biological material in research, according to new Brazilian regulations. Both norms – Resolution 441/11 of the National Health Council, approved on 12 May 2011, and (...)
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  44. Jeffrey H. Barker & Lauren Polcrack (2001). Respect for Persons, Informed Consent Andthe Assessment of Infectious Disease Risks in Xenotransplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):53-70.score: 441.0
    Given the increasing need for solid organ and tissue transplants and the decreasing supply of suitable allographic organs and tissue to meet this need, it is understandable that the hope for successful xenotransplantation has resurfaced in recent years. The biomedical obstacles to xenotransplantation encountered in previous attempts could be mitigated or overcome by developments in immunosuppression and especially by genetic manipulation of organ source animals. In this essay we consider the history of xenotransplantation, discuss the biomedical obstacles to success, explore (...)
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  45. Federica Artizzu (2008). The Informed Consent Aftermath of the Genetic Revolution. An Italian Example of Implementation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):181-190.score: 441.0
    A great part of human genetics research is carried out collecting data and building large databases of biological samples that are in a non-anonymous format. These constitute a valuable resource for future research. The construction of such databases and tissue banks facilitates important scientific progress. However, biobanks have been recognized as ethically problematic because they contain thousands of data that could expose individuals and populations to discrimination, stigmatization and psychological stress if misused. Informed consent is regarded as a (...)
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  46. Klaus Hoeyer & Niels Lynöe (2006). Motivating Donors to Genetic Research? Anthropological Reasons to Rethink the Role of Informed Consent. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):13-23.score: 441.0
    In this article we explore the contribution from social anthropology to the medical ethical debates about the use of informed consent in research, based on blood samples and other forms of tissue. The article springs from a project exploring donors’ motivation for providing blood and healthcare data for genetic research to be executed by a Swedish start-up genomics company. This article is not confined to empirical findings, however, as we suggest that anthropology provides reason to reassess the theoretical (...)
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  47. J. V. Lavery (2007). Commentary: Refocusing the Ethics of Informed Consent: Could Ritual Improve the Ethics of the Noma Study. In James V. Lavery (ed.), Ethical Issues in International Biomedical Research: A Casebook. Oxford University Press.score: 438.0
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  48. Jukka Varelius (2009). Collective Informed Consent and Decision Power. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):39-50.score: 435.0
    It has been suggested that, in addition to individual level decision-making, informed consent procedures could be used in collective decision-making too. One of the main criticisms directed at this suggestion concerns decision-making power. It is maintained that consent is a veto power concept and that, as such, it is not appropriate for collective decision-making. This paper examines this objection to collective informed consent. It argues that veto power informed consent can have some uses (...)
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  49. Roberta M. Berry (2005). Informed Consent Law, Ethics, and Practice: From Infancy to Reflective Adolescence. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 17 (1):64-81.score: 435.0
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