Search results for 'Inherence' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). Inherence, Causation, and Conceivability in Spinoza”. Journal of the History of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    In this paper I suggest a new interpretation of the relations of inherence, causation and conception in Spinoza. I discuss the views of Don Garrett on this issue and argue against Della Rocca's recent suggestion that a strict endorsement of the PSR leads necessarily to the identification of the relations of inherence, causation and conception. I argue that (1) Spinoza never endorsed this identity, and (2) that Della Rocca's suggestion could not be considered as a legitimate reconstruction or (...)
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  2. Andrei Cimpian & Erika Salomon (forthcoming). The Inherence Heuristic: An Intuitive Means of Making Sense of the World, and a Potential Precursor to Psychological Essentialism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-78.score: 24.0
    We propose that human reasoning relies on an inherence heuristic, an implicit cognitive process that leads people to explain observed patterns (e.g., girls wear pink) in terms of the inherent features of their constituents (e.g., pink is an inherently feminine color). We then demonstrate how this proposed heuristic can provide a unified account for a broad set of findings spanning areas of research that might at first appear unrelated (e.g., system justification, nominal realism, is–ought errors in moral reasoning). By (...)
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  3. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2006). Inherence and the Immanent Cause in Spinoza. Leibniz Review 16:43-52.score: 21.0
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  4. Nicholaos Jones (2010). Nyāya-Vaiśesika Inherence, Buddhist Reduction, and Huayan Total Power. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):215-230.score: 15.0
    This paper elaborates upon various responses to the Problem of the One over the Many, in the service of two central goals. The first is to situate Huayan's mereology within the context of Buddhism's historical development, showing its continuity with a broader tradition of philosophizing about part-whole relations. The second goal is to highlight the way in which Huayan's mereology combines the virtues of the Nyāya-Vaisheshika and Indian Buddhist solutions to the Problem of the One over the Many while avoiding (...)
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  5. Philip Hefner (2006). Religion and Science: Separateness or Co-Inherence? Zygon 41 (4):781-784.score: 15.0
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  6. G. E. L. Owen (1965). Inherence. Phronesis 10 (1):97 - 105.score: 15.0
  7. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2009). Spinoza's Metaphysics of Substance: The Substance-Mode Relation as a Relation of Inherence and Predication. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (1):17-82.score: 15.0
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  8. Marilyn McCord Adams (1982). Relations, Inherence and Subsistence: Or, Was Ockham a Nestorian in Christology? Noûs 16 (1):62-75.score: 15.0
  9. Daniel T. Devereux (1992). Inherence and Primary Substance in Aristotle's Categories. Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):113-131.score: 15.0
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  10. Thomas M. Lennon (1974). The Inherence Pattern and Descartes'. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (1):43-52.score: 15.0
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  11. James Duerlinger (1970). Predication and Inherence in Aristotle's "Categories". Phronesis 15 (2):179 - 203.score: 15.0
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  12. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). Spinoza on Inherence, Causation, and Conception. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):365-386.score: 15.0
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  13. James Duerlinger (1970). Predication and Inherence in Aristotle's Categories. Phronesis 15 (1):179-203.score: 15.0
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  14. John Malcolm (1979). A Reconsideration of the Identity and Inherence Theories of the Copula. Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (4):383-400.score: 15.0
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  15. Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality: An Analysis of Meng Tzu 6a‐a‐51: (I) the Mind‐Inherence and the Mind‐Dependence of Morality. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (2):169-193.score: 15.0
  16. Alan Hausman & David Hausman (1996). Berkeley's Semantic Dilemma: Beyond the Inherence Model. History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):221 - 238.score: 15.0
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  17. Alan Hausman (1984). Adhering to Inherence: A New Look at the Old Steps in Berkeley's March to Idealism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):421 - 443.score: 15.0
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  18. Kwong-Loi Shun (1991). Mencius and the Mind-Inherence of Morality: Mencius' Rejection of Kao Tzu's Maxim in Meng Tzu 2a:2 1: I. Kao Tzu's Maxim. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):371-386.score: 15.0
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  19. Keith McPartland (2013). On an Attempt to Resolve an Inconsistency in Aristotle's Account of Inherence. Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):375-390.score: 15.0
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  20. Stephen Cade Hetherington (1984). A Note on Inherence. Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):218-223.score: 15.0
  21. L. Nathan Oaklander (1977). The Inherence Interpretation of Berkeley. Modern Schoolman 54 (3):261-269.score: 15.0
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  22. Davlde Scarso (2006). Abstract: Inherence and Homology. Chiasmi International 8:338-338.score: 15.0
  23. Davlde Scarso (2006). Résumé: Inhérence et homologie. Chiasmi International 8:337-337.score: 15.0
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  24. C. C. W. Taylor (2014). Inherence: A Literary Footnote. Phronesis 59 (1):110-111.score: 15.0
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  25. B. K. Dalai (2005). Problem of Inherence in Indian Logic. Pratibha Prakashan.score: 15.0
     
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  26. Martin[from old catalog] Gear (1950). Inherence. Calcutta, Universal Publications.score: 15.0
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  27. Jean-Baptiste Rauzy (2005). L'inhérence Conceptuelle, la Raison Suffisante Et David Wiggings. In D. Berlioz F. Nef (ed.), Leibniz Et les Puissances du Langage. Vrin.score: 15.0
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  28. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2013). Spinoza's Metaphysics: Substance and Thought. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    This book is comprised of two parts. The first four chapters concentrate on the metaphysics of substance, while the last two address Spinoza’s metaphysics of thought. These two parts are closely connected, and several crucial claims in the last two chapters rely on arguments advanced in the first four. I intentionally use the term ‘metaphysics of thought’ rather than ‘philosophy of mind’ for two main reasons. First, the domain of thought in Spinoza is far more extensive than anything associated with (...)
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  29. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Justice as Inherent Rights: A Response to My Commentators. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):261-279.score: 7.0
    The critical comments by my fellow symposiasts on my book, Justice: Rights and Wrongs , have provided me with the opportunity to clarify parts of my argument and to correct some misunderstandings; they have also helped me see more clearly than I did before the import of some parts of my argument. In his comments, Paul Weithman points out features of the right order conception of justice that I had not noticed. They have also prodded me to clarify in what (...)
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  30. Matteo Morganti (2009). Inherent Properties and Statistics with Individual Particles in Quantum Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (3):223-231.score: 6.0
    This paper puts forward the hypothesis that the distinctive features of quantum statistics are exclusively determined by the nature of the properties it describes. In particular, all statistically relevant properties of identical quantum particles in many-particle systems are conjectured to be irreducible, ‘inherent’ properties only belonging to the whole system. This allows one to explain quantum statistics without endorsing the ‘Received View’ that particles are non-individuals, or postulating that quantum systems obey peculiar probability distributions, or assuming that there are primitive (...)
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  31. Richard J. Bernstein (2009). Does He Pull It Off? A Theistic Grounding of Natural Inherent Human Rights? Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):221-241.score: 6.0
    This paper focuses on two key issues in Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs . It argues that Wolterstorff's theistic grounding of inherent rights is not successful. It also argues that Wolterstorff does not provide adequate criteria for determining what exactly these natural inherent rights are or criteria that can help us to evaluate competing and contradictory claims about these rights. However, most of Wolterstorff's book is not concerned with the theistic grounding of inherent rights. Instead, it is devoted to (...)
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  32. Hans Henrik Bruun (2008). Objectivity, Value Spheres, and "Inherent Laws": On Some Suggestive Isomorphisms Between Weber, Bourdieu, and Luhmann. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (1):97-120.score: 6.0
    I give an account of Max Weber's views concerning the basis of the objectivity of the cultural sciences. In this connection, I offer a critical discussion of his distinction between different "value spheres," each with its own "intrinsic logic." I then consider parallels between Weber's "value spheres" and central elements of Bourdieu's field theory and Luhmann's systems theory, and try to show to what extent Bourdieu's and Luhmann's problems, and the solutions they suggest, can be seen as similar to Weber's. (...)
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  33. Louis G. Lombardi (1983). Inherent Worth, Respect, and Rights. Environmental Ethics 5 (3):257-270.score: 6.0
    Paul W. Taylor has defended a life-centered ethics that considers the inherent worth of all living things to be the same. l examine reasons for ascribing inherent worth to all living beings, but argue that there can be various levels of inherent worth. Differences in capacities among types of life are used to justify such levels. I argue that once levels of inherent worth are distinguished, it becomes reasonable torestrict rights to human beings.
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  34. Dan Ryder, Explaining the "Inhereness" of Qualia Representationally: Why We Seem to Have a Visual Field.score: 6.0
    A representationalist about qualia takes qualitative states to be aspects of the intentional content of sensory or sensory-like representations. When you experience the redness of an apple, they say, your visual system is merely representing that there is a red surface at such-and-such a place in front of you. And when you experience a red afterimage, your visual system is (non-veridically) representing something similar (Harman 1990, Dretske 1995, Tye 1995, Lycan 1996). Your sensory state does not literally have an intrinsic (...)
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  35. Kevin Lynch (2012). On the “Tension” Inherent in Self-Deception. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):433-450.score: 6.0
    Alfred Mele's deflationary account of self-deception has frequently been criticised for being unable to explain the ?tension? inherent in self-deception. These critics maintain that rival theories can better account for this tension, such as theories which suppose self-deceivers to have contradictory beliefs. However, there are two ways in which the tension idea has been understood. In this article, it is argued that on one such understanding, Mele's deflationism can account for this tension better than its rivals, but only if we (...)
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  36. Lisa Downing (2012). Maupertuis on Attraction as an Inherent Property of Matter. In Janiak Schliesser (ed.), Interpreting Newton.score: 6.0
    Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis’ famous and influential Discours sur les différentes figures des astres, which represented the first public defense of attractionism in the Cartesian stronghold of the Paris Academy, sometimes suggests a metaphysically agnostic defense of gravity as simply a regularity. However, Maupertuis’ considered account in the essay, I argue, is much more subtle. I analyze Maupertuis’ position, showing how it is generated by an extended consideration of the possibility of attraction as an inherent property and fuelled by (...)
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  37. Till Grüne-yanoff (2008). Action Explanations Are Not Inherently Normative. Theoria 74 (1):60-78.score: 6.0
    "Though this be madness, yet there is method in't." Hamlet , act II, scene ii Abstract: Inherent normativity is the claim that intentional action explanations necessarily have to comply with normatively understood rationality constraints on the ascribed propositional attitudes. This paper argues against inherent normativity in three steps. First, it presents three examples of actions successfully explained with propositional attitudes, where the ascribed attitudes violate relevant rationality constraints. Second, it argues that the inference rules that systematise propositional attitudes are qualitatively (...)
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  38. Ed Keenan (1999). Quantification in English is Inherently Sortal. History and Philosophy of Logic 20 (3-4):251-265.score: 6.0
    Within Linguistics the semantic analysis of natural languages (English, Swahili, for example) has drawn extensively on semantical concepts first formulated and studied within classical logic, principally first order logic. Nowhere has this contribution been more substantive than in the domain of quantification and variable binding. As studies of these notions in natural language have developed they have taken on a life of their own, resulting in refinements and generalizations of the classical quantifiers as well as the discovery of new types (...)
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  39. Veneeta Dayal (1998). Any as Inherently Modal. Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (5):433-476.score: 6.0
    The primary theoretical focus of this paper is on Free Choice uses of any, in particular on two phenomena that have remained largely unstudied. One involves the ability of any phrases to occur in affirmative episodic statements when aided by suitable noun modifiers. The other involves the difference between modals of necessity and possibility with respect to licensing of any. The central thesis advanced here is that FC any is a universal determiner whose domain of quantification is not a set (...)
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  40. Allen C. Dotson (1991). What Determines Whether a Wave Function is Inherently Necessary? Foundations of Physics 21 (7):821-829.score: 6.0
    The inherent necessity of wave functions may be determined in either of two ways. One way, frequently presupposed, states that the fundamental validity of wave functions is determined generically: The nature of the system determines the assignability of inherently necessary wave functions. The other approach holds that it is the specific experiment which determines the systems for which description by use of wave functions is fundamentally valid. A guideline based on this contextual approach is proposed and tested in three experimental (...)
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  41. Mike Lukich (2002). “Non-Natural” Qualities in G.E. Moore: Inherent or Contingent? Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):15 - 21.score: 6.0
    G.E. Moore's theory of the nature of the quality referred to by the word good asserts that this quality is non-natural. If it is, further, supposed that this non-natural quality belongs necessarily and exclusively to those events, human acts, entities, etc., which possess certain strictly determined natural qualities, and those qualities only, then it becomes difficult to explain the relation and the supposed interdependence allegedly existing between the two so disparate categories of qualities. This paper purports to show that, in (...)
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  42. Henrik R. Wulff (1995). The Inherent Paternalism in Clinical Practice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):299-311.score: 6.0
    It is sometimes suggested that the physician should offer the patient “just the facts,” preferably in a “value-free manner,” explain the different options, and then leave it to the patient to make the choice. This paper explores the extent to which this adviser model is realistic. The clinical decision process and the various components of clinical reasoning are discussed, and a distinction is made between the biological, empirical, empathic/hermeneutic and ethical components. The discussion is based on the ethical norms of (...)
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  43. Yitzhak Melamed (2013). Symposium on Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Spinoza’s Metaphysics,. Leibniz Review 23:207-222.score: 6.0
  44. Peter Øhrstrøm & Johan Dyhrberg (2007). Ethical Problems Inherent in Psychological Research Based on Internet Communication as Stored Information. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (3):221-241.score: 6.0
    This paper deals with certain ethical problems inherent in psychological research based on internet communication as stored information. Section 1 contains an analysis of research on Internet debates. In particular, it takes into account a famous example of deception for psychology research purposes. In section 2, the focus is on research on personal data in texts published on the Internet. Section 3 includes an attempt to formulate some ethical principles and guidelines, which should be regarded as fundamental in research on (...)
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  45. Philip M. Rosoff (2013). Institutional Futility Policies Are Inherently Unfair. HEC Forum 25 (3):191-209.score: 6.0
    For many years a debate has raged over what constitutes futile medical care, if patients have a right to demand what doctors label as futile, and whether physicians should be obliged to provide treatments that they think are inappropriate. More recently, the argument has shifted away from the difficult project of definitions, to outlining institutional policies and procedures that take a measured and patient-by-patient approach to deciding if an existing or desired intervention is futile. The prototype is the Texas Advance (...)
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  46. Ewald Lang (1990). Primary Perceptual Space and Inherent Proportion Schema: Two Interacting Categorization Grids Underlying the Conceptualization of Spatial Objects. Journal of Semantics 7 (2):121-141.score: 6.0
    Within the realms of cognitive studies, spatial structure is one of the few domains where attempts to trace mental representations from the level of sensory input conditions through conceptual structure to their lexical and grammatical organization seem to be feasible and revealing. Presenting a linguist's approach to the meaning and use of spatial dimensional terms, the paper aims to demonstrate why and how the semantic analysis of these linguistic items has to be justified in terms of nonlinguistic conceptual structure formation, (...)
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  47. Harald Atmanspacher, Inherent Global Stabilization of Unstable Local Behavior in Coupled Map Lattices.score: 6.0
    The behavior of two-dimensional coupled map lattices is studied with respect to the global stabilization of unstable local fixed points without external control. It is numerically shown under which circumstances such inherent global stabilization can be achieved for both synchronous and asynchronous updating. Two necessary conditions for inherent global stabilization are derived analytically.
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  48. Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal (2007). Corporate Growth as Inherently Moral. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:181-186.score: 6.0
    Dewey's understanding of growth is inseparably intertwined with his distinctively pragmatic understanding of the self-community relation and of knowledge as experimental. Within this framework, growth emerges as a process by which individual communities achieves fuller, richer, more inclusive, and more complex interactions with their environment by incorporating the perspective of "the other". Growth involves reintegration of problematic situations in ways which lead to expansion of self, of community, and of the relation between the two. In this way growth and workability (...)
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