Search results for 'Injury' (try it on Scholar)

677 found
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  1.  86
    Tony Stone & Andrew W. Young (1997). Delusions and Brain Injury: The Philosophy and Psychology of Belief. Mind and Language 12 (3-4):327-64.
    Circumscribed delusional beliefs can follow brain injury. We suggest that these involve anomalous perceptual experiences created by a deficit to the person's perceptual system, and misinterpretation of these experiences due to biased reasoning. We use the Capgras delusion (the claim that one or more of one's close relatives has been replaced by an exact replica or impostor) to illustrate this argument. Our account maintains that people voicing this delusion suffer an impairment that leads to faces being perceived as drained (...)
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  2.  14
    Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima (2015). On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy. Neuroethics 8 (1):27-38.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries, at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and (...)
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  3.  83
    Seth Lazar (2009). The Nature and Disvalue of Injury. Res Publica 15 (3):289-304.
    This paper explicates a conception of injury as right-violation, which allows us to distinguish between setbacks to interests that should, and should not, be the concern of theories of justice. It begins by introducing a hybrid theory of rights, grounded in (a) the mobilisation of our moral equality to (b) protect our most important interests, and shows how violations of rights are the concern of justice, while setbacks where one of the twin grounds of rights is defeated are not. (...)
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  4.  53
    Kerry Gutridge (2010). Safer Self-Injury or Assisted Self-Harm? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):79-92.
    Psychiatric patients may try (or express a desire) to injure themselves in hospital in order to cope with overwhelming emotional pain. Some health care practitioners and patients propose allowing a controlled amount of self-injury to occur in inpatient facilities, so as to prevent escalation of distress. Is this approach an example of professional assistance with harm? Or, is the approach more likely to minimise harm, by ensuring safer self-injury? In this article, I argue that health care practitioners who (...)
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  5.  28
    Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  6.  1
    Kyriakos Kontostathis (1992). Topological Framework for Finite Injury. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 38 (1):189-195.
    We formulate an abstract version of the finite injury method in the form of the Baire category theorem. The theorem has the following corollaries: The Friedberg-Muchnik pair of recursively enumerable degrees, the Sacks splitting theorem, the existence of a minimal degree below 0′ and the Shoenfield jump theorem.
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  7.  4
    L. Syd M. Johnson, Brad Partridge & Frédéric Gilbert (2015). Framing the Debate: Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuroethics 8 (1):1-4.
    Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury affect millions of people worldwide. mTBI has been called the “signature injury” of the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, affecting thousands of active duty service men and women, and veterans. Sport-related concussion represents a significant public health problem, with elite and professional athletes, and millions of youth and amateur athletes worldwide suffering concussions annually. These brain injuries have received scant attention from neuroethicists, and the focus of this special issue is on (...)
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  8.  9
    Chris Miller (2013). Causation in Personal Injury Law: The Case for a Probabilistic Approach. [REVIEW] Topoi 33 (2):1-12.
    This paper makes the case for a wider acceptance of a probabilistic approach to causation in negligence. This acceptance would help to remove much of the incoherence which has come to afflict the English law of personal injury law. This incoherence can also be found in other common law jurisdictions (notably those of the United States, Canada and Australia). Concentrating upon recent UK case law, the argument opposes the contention that ‘naked statistics’ can play no role in establishing causation. (...)
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  9.  8
    Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen (2014). Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These (...)
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  10.  7
    S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & G. R. Gillett (2014). Traumatic Brain Injury: An Objective Model of Consent. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 7 (1):11-18.
    The aim of this paper was to explore the issue of consent when considering the use of a life saving but not necessarily restorative surgical intervention for severe traumatic brain injury. A previous study has investigated the issue amongst 500 healthcare workers by using a two-part structured interview to assess opinion regarding decompressive craniectomy for three patients with varying injury severity. A visual analogue scale was used to assess the strengths of their opinions both before and after being (...)
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  11. Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart & Todd G. Nick (2003). Measurement of Impaired Self-Awareness After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison of the Patient Competency Rating Scale and the Awareness Questionnaire. Brain Injury 17 (1):25-37.
  12.  37
    Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Toad G. Nick & Stuart A. Yablon (2005). Neuroanatomic Basis of Impaired Self-Awareness After Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings From Early Computed Tomography. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):287-300.
  13.  44
    Laura J. Bach & Anthony S. David (2006). Self-Awareness After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):397-414.
  14.  2
    K. L. Haywood, J. Hargreaves & S. E. Lamb (2004). Multi‐Item Outcome Measures for Lateral Ligament Injury of the Ankle: A Structured Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):339-352.
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  15.  33
    Katherine J. Morris (1996). Pain, Injury, and First/Third-Person Asymmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):125-56.
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  16.  26
    Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro (2005). Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.
  17.  24
    George P. Prigatano & Sterling C. Johnson (2003). The Three Vectors of Consciousness and Their Disturbances After Brain Injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 13 (1):13-29.
  18.  4
    Stephen Winter (2006). On the Possibilities of Group Injury. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):393–413.
  19.  6
    Michelle M. Mello (2008). Rationalizing Vaccine Injury Compensation. Bioethics 22 (1):32–42.
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  20.  1
    William S. Battersby (1951). The Regional Gradient of Critical Flicker Frequency After Frontal or Occipital Lobe Injury. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (1):59.
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  21.  2
    E. G. Wever & M. Lawrence (1941). Tonal Interference in Relation to Cochlear Injury. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (4):283.
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  22.  2
    Angela T. Morgan & Jemma Skeat (2011). Evaluating Service Delivery for Speech and Swallowing Problems Following Paediatric Brain Injury: An International Survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):275-281.
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  23. Irving E. Alexander & Frederick J. Githler (1953). Effects of Intense Pure Tone Stimuli When Magnitude of Initial Injury is Controlled. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (1):49.
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  24. Shelley Marie Gremley, Self-Awareness and Memory Deficits in Sub-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.
  25. E. V. Sharova (2005). Electrographic Correlates of Brain Reactions to Afferent Stimuli in Postcomatose Unconscious States After Severe Brain Injury. Human Physiology 31 (3):245-254.
     
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  26.  32
    Gareth S. Owen, Fabian Freyenhagen, Wayne Martin & Anthony S. David, Clinical Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity in Acquired Brain Injury with Personality Change.
    Assessment of decision-making capacity can be difficult in acquired brain injury particularly with the syndrome of organic personality disorder. Clinical neuroscience may help but there are challenges translating its constructs to the decision-making abilities considered relevant by law and ethics. An in-depth interview study of DMC in OPD was undertaken. Six patients were purposefully sampled and rich interview data were acquired for scrutiny using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Interview data revealed that awareness of deficit and thinking about psychological states can (...)
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  27. A. C. Sparkes (2005). When Narratives Matter: Men, Sport, and Spinal Cord Injury. Medical Humanities 31 (2):81-88.
    Next SectionExperiencing a spinal cord injury (SCI) and becoming disabled through sport is a major disruptive life event that instigates a multiplicity of difficult and complex issues that the person has to deal with. One of these problems is how to restory a life and construct new body/self relationships and identities over time. To explore this process, we focus on the life stories of a small group of men (n = 14) who have suffered SCI and become disabled through (...)
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  28.  3
    Giles Birchley, Kerry Jones, Richard Huxtable, Jeremy Dixon, Jenny Kitzinger & Linda Clare (2016). Dying Well with Reduced Agency: A Scoping Review and Thematic Synthesis of the Decision-Making Process in Dementia, Traumatic Brain Injury and Frailty. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):46.
    BackgroundIn most Anglophone nations, policy and law increasingly foster an autonomy-based model, raising issues for large numbers of people who fail to fit the paradigm, and indicating problems in translating practical and theoretical understandings of ‘good death’ to policy. Three exemplar populations are frail older people, people with dementia and people with severe traumatic brain injury. We hypothesise that these groups face some over-lapping challenges in securing good end-of-life care linked to their limited agency. To better understand these challenges, (...)
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  29.  11
    Kathleen E. Bachynski & Daniel S. Goldberg (2014). Youth Sports & Public Health: Framing Risks of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in American Football and Ice Hockey. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (3):323-333.
    The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates.
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  30.  6
    Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2015). Traumatic Brain Injury, Neuroscience, and the Legal System. Neuroethics 8 (1):55-64.
    This essay addresses the question: What is the probative value of including neuroscience data in court cases where the defendant might have had a traumatic brain injury? That is, this essay attempts to articulate how well we can connect scientific data and clinical test results to the demands of the Daubert standard in the United States’ court system, and, given the fact that neuroimaging is already being used in our courts, what, if anything, we should do about this fact. (...)
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  31.  72
    Jeff McMahan (2006). Paradoxes of Abortion and Prenatal Injury. Ethics 116 (4):625-655.
    Many people who believe that abortion may often be justified by appeal to the pregnant woman’s interests also believe that a woman’s infliction of significant but nonlethal injury on her fetus can seldom be justified by appeal to her interests. Yet the second of these beliefs can seem to cast doubt on the first. For the view that the infliction of prenatal injury is seriously morally objectionable may seem to presuppose a view about the status of the fetus (...)
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  32.  49
    Sarah Clark Miller (2009). Moral Injury and Relational Harm: Analyzing Rape in Darfur. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (4):504-523.
    Rather than focusing on the legal and political questions that surround genocidal rape, in this paper I treat a vital area of inquiry that has received much less attention: the moral significance of genocidal rape. My aim is to augment existing moral accounts of rape in order to address the specific contexts of genocidal rape. I move beyond understanding rape primarily as a violation of an individual's interests or agential abilities. The account I offer builds on these approaches (as well (...)
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  33.  27
    Joseph J. Fins & Alexandra Suppes (2011). Brain Injury and the Culture of Neglect: Musings on an Uncertain Future. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (3):731-746.
    Our essay will address both the right-to-die movement in America and the emerging culture of neglect in the treatment of a class of patients with disorders of consciousness with which the right-to-die movement is entwined. We trace the etiology of these two themes through changes in our scientific understanding of brain injury and recovery against a growing societal acculturation to dominion over one's self at life's end.
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  34.  2
    S. Honeybul, G. Gillett, K. Ho & C. Lind (2012). Ethical Considerations for Performing Decompressive Craniectomy as a Life-Saving Intervention for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):657-661.
    In all fields of clinical medicine, there is an increasing awareness that outcome must be assessed in terms of quality of life and cost effectiveness, rather than merely length of survival. This is especially the case when considering decompressive craniectomy for severe traumatic brain injury. The procedure itself is technically straightforward and involves temporarily removing a large section of the skull vault in order to provide extra space into which the injured brain can expand. A number of studies have (...)
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  35.  15
    Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for a safety trial, (...)
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  36.  9
    Michael E. Mytilinaios & Theodore A. Slaman (1988). Σ2-Collection and the Infinite Injury Priority Method. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):212 - 221.
    We show that the existence of a recursively enumerable set whose Turing degree is neither low nor complete cannot be proven from the basic axioms of first order arithmetic (P -) together with Σ 2 -collection (BΣ 2 ). In contrast, a high (hence, not low) incomplete recursively enumerable set can be assembled by a standard application of the infinite injury priority method. Similarly, for each n, the existence of an incomplete recursively enumerable set that is neither low n (...)
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  37.  18
    R. M. Kennedy & Dina Georgis (2010). Touched by Injury: Toward an Educational Theory of Anti-Racist Humanism. Ethics and Education 4 (1):19-30.
    Informed by the critical humanisms of Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, and Paul Gilroy, the authors argue for an orientation to teaching and learning that troubles the continuing effects of dehumanizing race logic. Reflecting on Paul Haggis's Oscar award winning film Crash from 2004, they suggest that the metaphor of racial 'crashing' captures what happens when we act out from experiences of racial injury instead of being touched by it. They propose a psychoanalytic pedagogy of emotions as a method for (...)
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  38.  6
    K. Schipper, G. A. M. Widdershoven & T. A. Abma (2011). Citizenship and Autonomy in Acquired Brain Injury. Nursing Ethics 18 (4):526-536.
    In ethical theory, different concepts of autonomy can be distinguished. In this article we explore how these concepts of autonomy are combined in theory in the citizenship paradigm, and how this turns out in the practice of care for people with acquired brain injury. The stories of a professional caregiver and a client with acquired brain injury show that the combination of various concepts of autonomy in practice leads to tensions between caregivers and clients. These dynamics are discussed (...)
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  39.  9
    Matthew Congdon (2016). Wronged Beyond Words On the Publicity and Repression of Moral Injury. Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (8):815-834.
    In this article, I discuss cases in which moral grievances, particularly assertions that a moral injury has taken place, are systematically obstructed by received linguistic and epistemic practices. I suggest a social epistemological model for theorizing such cases of moral epistemic injustice. Towards this end, I offer a reconstruction of Lyotard’s concept of the differend, comparing it with Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice, and considering it in light of some criticisms posed by Axel Honneth. Through this reconstruction and (...)
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  40.  27
    B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). "Secret" Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36 – 50.
    This study examined more than 2,500 war images from U.S. television news, newspapers, news magazines, and online news sites during the first five weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and found that only 10% showed injury or death. The paper analyzes which media platforms were most willing to show casualties and offers insights on when journalists should use gruesome war images or keep them secret.
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  41.  6
    R. M. Kennedy & Dina Georgis (2010). Touched by Injury: Toward an Educational Theory of Anti-Racist Humanism. Ethics and Education 4 (1):19-30.
    Informed by the critical humanisms of Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, and Paul Gilroy, the authors argue for an orientation to teaching and learning that troubles the continuing effects of dehumanizing race logic. Reflecting on Paul Haggis's Oscar award winning film Crash from 2004, they suggest that the metaphor of racial 'crashing' captures what happens when we act out from experiences of racial injury instead of being touched by it. They propose a psychoanalytic pedagogy of emotions as a method for (...)
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  42.  13
    Michael Mytilinaios (1989). Finite Injury and ∑1-Induction. Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (1):38 - 49.
    Working in the language of first-order arithmetic we consider models of the base theory P - . Suppose M is a model of P - and let M satisfy induction for σ 1 -formulas. First it is shown that the Friedberg-Muchnik finite injury argument can be performed inside M, and then, using a blocking method for the requirements, we prove that the Sacks splitting construction can be done in M. So, the "amount" of induction needed to perform the known (...)
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  43.  24
    Kate Lindemann (2001). Persons with Adult-Onset Head Injury: A Crucial Resource for Feminist Philosophers. Hypatia 16 (4):105-123.
    : The effects of head injury, even mild traumatic brain injury, are wide-ranging and profound. Persons with adult-onset head injury offer feminist philosophers important perspectives for philosophical methodology and philosophical research concerning personal identity, mind-body theories, and ethics. The needs of persons with head injury require the expansion of typical teaching strategies, and such adaptations appear beneficial to both disabled and non-disabled students.
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  44.  14
    Vern R. Walker, Nathaniel Carie, Courtney C. DeWitt & Eric Lesh (2011). A Framework for the Extraction and Modeling of Fact-Finding Reasoning From Legal Decisions: Lessons From the Vaccine/Injury Project Corpus. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 19 (4):291-331.
    This article describes the Vaccine/Injury Project Corpus, a collection of legal decisions awarding or denying compensation for health injuries allegedly due to vaccinations, together with models of the logical structure of the reasoning of the factfinders in those cases. This unique corpus provides useful data for formal and informal logic theory, for natural-language research in linguistics, and for artificial intelligence research. More importantly, the article discusses lessons learned from developing protocols for manually extracting the logical structure and generating the (...)
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  45.  1
    Joshua Daniel (2016). Moral Injury and Recovery in the Shadow of the American Civil War: Roycean Insights and Womanist Corrections. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 37 (2):151-168.
    The point of this article is to test how well Josiah Royce’s philosophy of community can be utilized to conceptualize moral injury and recovery.1 The term “moral injury” is of recent coinage, articulated by those working with combat veterans and their challenges returning to civilian life, particularly veterans returned from Vietnam and from America’s recent presence in the Middle East. The basic idea is that, in combat, soldiers harm their own moral capacities by committing or participating in acts (...)
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  46.  13
    Corwin Boake & Leonard Diller (2005). History of Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. In Walter M. High Jr, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press
  47.  1
    Grant Gillett (2016). Minding and Caring About Ethics in Brain Injury. Hastings Center Report 46 (3):44-45.
    Joseph Fins's book Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness is a considerable addition to the literature on disorders of consciousness and the murky area of minimally conscious states. Fins brings to this fraught area of clinical practice and neuroethical analysis a series of stories and reflections resulting in a pressing and sustained ethical challenge both to clinicians and to health care systems. The challenge is multifaceted, with diagnostic and therapeutic demands to be met (...)
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  48.  7
    Knut A. Jacobsen (1994). The Institutionalization of the Ethics of “Non-Injury” Toward All “Beings” in Ancient India. Environmental Ethics 16 (3):287-301.
    The principle of non-injury toward all living beings (ahimsā) in India was originally a rule restraining human interaction with the natural environment. I compare two discourses on the relationship between humans and the natural environment in ancient India: the discourse of the priestly sacrificial cult and the discourse of the renunciants. In the sacrificial cult, all living beings were conceptualized as food. The renunciants opposed this conception and favored the ethics of non-injury toward all beings (plants, animals, etc.), (...)
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  49.  27
    Brick Johnstone & Bret A. Glass (2008). Support for a Neuropsychological Model of Spirituality in Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury. Zygon 43 (4):861-874.
    Recent research suggests that spiritual experiences are related to increased physiological activity of the frontal and temporal lobes and decreased activity of the right parietal lobe. The current study determined if similar relationships exist between self-reported spirituality and neuropsychological abilities associated with those cerebral structures for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants included 26 adults with TBI referred for neuropsychological assessment. Measures included the Core Index of Spirituality (INSPIRIT); neuropsychological indices of cerebral structures: temporal lobes (Wechsler Memory Scale-III), (...)
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  50.  8
    George P. Prigatano (1991). Disturbances of Self-Awareness of Deficit After Traumatic Brain Injury. In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press 111--126.
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