Search results for 'Injury' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tony Stone & Andrew W. Young (1997). Delusions and Brain Injury: The Philosophy and Psychology of Belief. Mind and Language 12 (3-4):327-64.score: 24.0
    Circumscribed delusional beliefs can follow brain injury. We suggest that these involve anomalous perceptual experiences created by a deficit to the person's perceptual system, and misinterpretation of these experiences due to biased reasoning. We use the Capgras delusion (the claim that one or more of one's close relatives has been replaced by an exact replica or impostor) to illustrate this argument. Our account maintains that people voicing this delusion suffer an impairment that leads to faces being perceived as drained (...)
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  2. Seth Lazar (2009). The Nature and Disvalue of Injury. Res Publica 15 (3):289-304.score: 24.0
    This paper explicates a conception of injury as right-violation, which allows us to distinguish between setbacks to interests that should, and should not, be the concern of theories of justice. It begins by introducing a hybrid theory of rights, grounded in (a) the mobilisation of our moral equality to (b) protect our most important interests, and shows how violations of rights are the concern of justice, while setbacks where one of the twin grounds of rights is defeated are not. (...)
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  3. Kerry Gutridge (2010). Safer Self-Injury or Assisted Self-Harm? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):79-92.score: 24.0
    Psychiatric patients may try (or express a desire) to injure themselves in hospital in order to cope with overwhelming emotional pain. Some health care practitioners and patients propose allowing a controlled amount of self-injury to occur in inpatient facilities, so as to prevent escalation of distress. Is this approach an example of professional assistance with harm? Or, is the approach more likely to minimise harm, by ensuring safer self-injury? In this article, I argue that health care practitioners who (...)
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  4. Jonathan Cole (2005). Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.score: 24.0
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  5. S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & G. R. Gillett (2014). Traumatic Brain Injury: An Objective Model of Consent. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 7 (1):11-18.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper was to explore the issue of consent when considering the use of a life saving but not necessarily restorative surgical intervention for severe traumatic brain injury. A previous study has investigated the issue amongst 500 healthcare workers by using a two-part structured interview to assess opinion regarding decompressive craniectomy for three patients with varying injury severity. A visual analogue scale was used to assess the strengths of their opinions both before and after being (...)
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  6. Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima (forthcoming). On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy. Neuroethics:1-12.score: 24.0
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries (TBI), at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone (...)
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  7. Annette Sterr Philip J. A. Dean (2013). Long-Term Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury on Cognitive Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Although a proportion of individuals report chronic cognitive difficulties after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), results from behavioural testing have been inconsistent. In fact, the variability inherent to the mTBI population may be masking subtle cognitive deficits. We hypothesised that this variability could be reduced by accounting for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) in the sample. 36 participants with mTBI (>1 year post-injury) and 36 non-head injured controls performed information processing speed (Paced Visual Serial Addition Task, PVSAT) and working memory (...)
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  8. Karen Caeyenberghs, Alexander Leemans, Inge Leunissen, Karla Michiels & Stephan Patrick Swinnen (2013). Topological Correlations of Structural and Functional Networks in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Despite an increasing amount of specific correlation studies between structural and functional connectivity, there is still a need for combined studies, especially in pathological conditions. Impairments of brain white matter and diffuse axonal injuries are commonly suspected to be responsible for the disconnection hypothesis in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Moreover, our previous research on TBI patients shows a strong relationship between abnormalities in topological organization of brain networks and behavioral deficits. In this study, we combined task-related functional connectivity (...)
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  9. Anjali Raja Beharelle, Danielle Tisserand, Donald T. Stuss, Anthony R. Mcintosh & Brian Levine (2011). Brain Activity Patterns Uniquely Supporting Visual Feature Integration After Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients typically respond more slowly and with more variability than controls during tasks of attention requiring speeded reaction time. These behavioral changes are attributable, at least in part, to diffuse axonal injury (DAI), which affects integrated processing in distributed systems. Here we use a multivariate method sensitive to distributed neural activity to compare brain activity patterns of patients with chronic phase moderate-to-severe TBI to those of controls during performance on a visual feature-integration task assessing (...)
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  10. Robin E. Green Diana Frasca, Jennifer Tomaszczyk, Bradford J. McFadyen (2013). Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Acute Decline: What Role Does Environmental Enrichment Play? A Scoping Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1) examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE) can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2) examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations (...)
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  11. James C. Gee Junghoon Kim, Brian Avants, John Whyte (2013). Methodological Considerations in Longitudinal Morphometry of Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has recently been reconceptualized as a chronic, evolving disease process. This new view necessitates quantitative assessment of post-injury changes in brain structure that may allow more accurate monitoring and prediction of recovery. In particular, TBI is known to trigger neurodegenerative processes and therefore quantifying progression of diffuse atrophy over time is currently of utmost interest. However, there are various methodological issues inherent to longitudinal morphometry in TBI that researchers need to be aware of. In (...)
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  12. Sterling C. Johnson Kimberly D. Farbota, Barbara B. Bendlin, Andrew L. Alexander, Howard A. Rowley, Robert J. Dempsey (2012). Longitudinal Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Neuropsychological Correlates in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Traumatic brain injury often involves focal cortical injury and white matter (WM) damage that can be measured shortly after injury. Additionally, slowly evolving WM change can be observed but there is a paucity of research on the duration and spatial pattern of long-term changes several years post-injury. The current study utilized diffusion tensor imaging to identify regional WM changes in 12 TBI patients and 9 healthy controls at three time points over a four-year period. Neuropsychological testing (...)
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  13. Robin E. A. Green Lesley S. Miller, Brenda Colella, David Mikulis, Jerome Maller (2013). Environmental Enrichment May Protect Against Hippocampal Atrophy in the Chronic Stages of Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Objective: To examine the relationship between environmental enrichment (EE) and hippocampal atrophy in the chronic stages of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data; observational, within-subjects. Participants: Patients (N=25) with moderate to severe TBI. Measures: Primary predictors: (1) An aggregate of self-report rating of EE (comprising hours of cognitive, physical, and social activities) at 5 months post-injury; (2) pre-injury years of education as a proxy for pre-morbid EE (or cognitive reserve). (...)
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  14. Chris Miller (2013). Causation in Personal Injury Law: The Case for a Probabilistic Approach. [REVIEW] Topoi:1-12.score: 24.0
    This paper makes the case for a wider acceptance of a probabilistic approach to causation in negligence. This acceptance would help to remove much of the incoherence which has come to afflict the English law of personal injury law. This incoherence can also be found in other common law jurisdictions (notably those of the United States, Canada and Australia). Concentrating upon recent UK case law, the argument opposes the contention that ‘naked statistics’ can play no role in establishing causation. (...)
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  15. Randolph J. Nudo (2013). Recovery After Brain Injury: Mechanisms and Principles. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:887.score: 24.0
    The past 20 years have represented an important period in the development of principles underlying neuroplasticity, especially as they apply to recovery from neurological injury. It is now generally accepted that acquired brain injuries, such as occur in stroke or trauma, initiate a cascade of regenerative events that last for at least several weeks, if not months. Many investigators have pointed out striking parallels between post-injury plasticity and the molecular and cellular events that take place during normal brain (...)
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  16. Charles Weijer, Andrew Peterson, Fiona Webster, Mackenzie Graham, Damian Cruse, Davinia Fernández-Espejo, Teneille Gofton, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Andrea Lazosky, Lorina Naci, Loretta Norton, Kathy Speechley, Bryan Young & Adrian M. Owen (2014). Ethics of Neuroimaging After Serious Brain Injury. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):41.score: 24.0
    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These (...)
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  17. Erin D. Bigler (2013). Traumatic Brain Injury, Neuroimaging, and Neurodegeneration. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (...)
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  18. Nazareth P. Castellanos, Ricardo Bajo, Pablo Cuesta, José Antonio Villacorta-Atienza, Nuria Paúl, Juan Garcia-Prieto, Francisco Del-Pozo & Fernando Maestú (2011). Alteration and Reorganization of Functional Networks: A New Perspective in Brain Injury Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    Plasticity is the mechanism underlying brain’s potential capability to compensate injury. Recently several studies have shown that functional connections among brain areas are severely altered by brain injury and plasticity leading to a reorganization of the networks. This new approach studies the impact of brain injury by means of alteration of functional interactions. The concept of functional connectivity refers to the statistical interdependencies between physiological time series simultaneously recorded in various brain areas and it could be an (...)
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  19. Daniel C. Krawczyk, Gerri Hanten, Elisabeth A. Wilde, Xiaoqi Li, Kathleen P. Schnelle, Tricia L. Merkley, Ana C. Vasquez, Lori G. Cook, Michelle McClelland, Sandra B. Chapman & Harvey S. Levin (2010). Deficits in Analogical Reasoning in Adolescents with Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 24.0
    Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) exhibit deficits in executive control, which may impact their reasoning abilities. Analogical reasoning requires working memory and inhibitory abilities. In this study, we tested adolescents with moderate to severe TBI and typically-developing (TD) controls on a set of picture analogy problems. Three factors were varied: complexity (number of relations in the problems), distraction (distractor item present or absent), and animacy (living or non-living items in the problems). We found that TD adolescents performed significantly (...)
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  20. Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart & Todd G. Nick (2003). Measurement of Impaired Self-Awareness After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison of the Patient Competency Rating Scale and the Awareness Questionnaire. Brain Injury 17 (1):25-37.score: 24.0
  21. Laura J. Bach & Anthony S. David (2006). Self-Awareness After Acquired and Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):397-414.score: 21.0
  22. Katherine J. Morris (1996). Pain, Injury, and First/Third-Person Asymmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):125-56.score: 21.0
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  23. Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro (2005). Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.score: 21.0
  24. Mark Sherer, Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Toad G. Nick & Stuart A. Yablon (2005). Neuroanatomic Basis of Impaired Self-Awareness After Traumatic Brain Injury: Findings From Early Computed Tomography. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):287-300.score: 21.0
  25. George P. Prigatano & Sterling C. Johnson (2003). The Three Vectors of Consciousness and Their Disturbances After Brain Injury. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 13 (1):13-29.score: 21.0
  26. Michelle M. Mello (2008). Rationalizing Vaccine Injury Compensation. Bioethics 22 (1):32–42.score: 21.0
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  27. Erin D. Bigler & Elisabeth A. Wilde (2010). Quantitative Neuroimaging and the Prediction of Rehabilitation Outcome Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 21.0
  28. Ann S. Choe, Visar Belegu, Shoko Yoshida, Suresh Joel, Cristina L. Sadowsky, Seth A. Smith, Peter C. M. van Zijl, James J. Pekar & John W. McDonald (2013). Extensive Neurological Recovery From a Complete Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report and Hypothesis on the Role of Cortical Plasticity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  29. K. L. Haywood, J. Hargreaves & S. E. Lamb (2004). Multi‐Item Outcome Measures for Lateral Ligament Injury of the Ankle: A Structured Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):339-352.score: 21.0
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  30. Angela T. Morgan & Jemma Skeat (2011). Evaluating Service Delivery for Speech and Swallowing Problems Following Paediatric Brain Injury: An International Survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (2):275-281.score: 21.0
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  31. E. G. Wever & M. Lawrence (1941). Tonal Interference in Relation to Cochlear Injury. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (4):283.score: 21.0
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  32. Stephen Winter (2006). On the Possibilities of Group Injury. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):393–413.score: 21.0
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  33. Irving E. Alexander & Frederick J. Githler (1953). Effects of Intense Pure Tone Stimuli When Magnitude of Initial Injury is Controlled. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (1):49.score: 21.0
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  34. William S. Battersby (1951). The Regional Gradient of Critical Flicker Frequency After Frontal or Occipital Lobe Injury. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (1):59.score: 21.0
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  35. Shelley Marie Gremley, Self-Awareness and Memory Deficits in Sub-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.score: 21.0
  36. Kyriakos Kontostathis (1992). Topological Framework for Finite Injury. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 38 (1):189-195.score: 21.0
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  37. E. V. Sharova (2005). Electrographic Correlates of Brain Reactions to Afferent Stimuli in Postcomatose Unconscious States After Severe Brain Injury. Human Physiology 31 (3):245-254.score: 21.0
     
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  38. Jeff McMahan (2006). Paradoxes of Abortion and Prenatal Injury. Ethics 116 (4):625-655.score: 18.0
    Many people who believe that abortion may often be justified by appeal to the pregnant woman’s interests also believe that a woman’s infliction of significant but nonlethal injury on her fetus can seldom be justified by appeal to her interests. Yet the second of these beliefs can seem to cast doubt on the first. For the view that the infliction of prenatal injury is seriously morally objectionable may seem to presuppose a view about the status of the fetus (...)
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  39. George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) (1991). Awareness of Deficits After Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume provides, for the first time, multidisciplinary perspectives on the problem of awareness of deficits following brain injury.
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  40. B. William Silcock, Carol B. Schwalbe & Susan Keith (2008). "Secret" Casualties: Images of Injury and Death in the Iraq War Across Media Platforms. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (1):36 – 50.score: 18.0
    This study examined more than 2,500 war images from U.S. television news, newspapers, news magazines, and online news sites during the first five weeks of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 and found that only 10% showed injury or death. The paper analyzes which media platforms were most willing to show casualties and offers insights on when journalists should use gruesome war images or keep them secret.
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  41. R. M. Kennedy & Dina Georgis (2010). Touched by Injury: Toward an Educational Theory of Anti-Racist Humanism. Ethics and Education 4 (1):19-30.score: 18.0
    Informed by the critical humanisms of Hannah Arendt, Frantz Fanon, and Paul Gilroy, the authors argue for an orientation to teaching and learning that troubles the continuing effects of dehumanizing race logic. Reflecting on Paul Haggis's Oscar award winning film Crash from 2004, they suggest that the metaphor of racial 'crashing' captures what happens when we act out from experiences of racial injury instead of being touched by it. They propose a psychoanalytic pedagogy of emotions as a method for (...)
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  42. Brick Johnstone & Bret A. Glass (2008). Support for a Neuropsychological Model of Spirituality in Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury. Zygon 43 (4):861-874.score: 18.0
    Recent research suggests that spiritual experiences are related to increased physiological activity of the frontal and temporal lobes and decreased activity of the right parietal lobe. The current study determined if similar relationships exist between self-reported spirituality and neuropsychological abilities associated with those cerebral structures for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants included 26 adults with TBI referred for neuropsychological assessment. Measures included the Core Index of Spirituality (INSPIRIT); neuropsychological indices of cerebral structures: temporal lobes (Wechsler Memory Scale-III), (...)
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  43. Kate Lindemann (2001). Persons with Adult-Onset Head Injury: A Crucial Resource for Feminist Philosophers. Hypatia 16 (4):105-123.score: 18.0
    : The effects of head injury, even mild traumatic brain injury, are wide-ranging and profound. Persons with adult-onset head injury offer feminist philosophers important perspectives for philosophical methodology and philosophical research concerning personal identity, mind-body theories, and ethics. The needs of persons with head injury require the expansion of typical teaching strategies, and such adaptations appear beneficial to both disabled and non-disabled students.
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  44. Frederic Bretzner, Frederic Gilbert, Françoise Baylis & Robert M. Brownstone (2011). Target Populations for First-In-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research in Spinal Cord Injury. Cell Stem Cell 8 (5):468-475.score: 18.0
    Geron recently announced that it had begun enrolling patients in the world's first-in-human clinical trial involving cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). This trial raises important questions regarding the future of hESC-based therapies, especially in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We address some safety and efficacy concerns with this research, as well as the ethics of fair subject selection. We consider other populations that might be better for this research: chronic complete SCI patients for a safety trial, (...)
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  45. Jeffrey Berger (2010). Insult to Injury: Ethical Confusion in American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):68-70.score: 18.0
    (2010). Insult to Injury: Ethical Confusion in American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 68-70.
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  46. K. Schipper, G. A. M. Widdershoven & T. A. Abma (2011). Citizenship and Autonomy in Acquired Brain Injury. Nursing Ethics 18 (4):526-536.score: 18.0
    In ethical theory, different concepts of autonomy can be distinguished. In this article we explore how these concepts of autonomy are combined in theory in the citizenship paradigm, and how this turns out in the practice of care for people with acquired brain injury. The stories of a professional caregiver and a client with acquired brain injury show that the combination of various concepts of autonomy in practice leads to tensions between caregivers and clients. These dynamics are discussed (...)
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  47. Walter M. High, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.) (2005). Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Rehabilitation For Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a state-of-the-science review of the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions.
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  48. Rachael Mulheron (2012). Rewriting the Requirement for a 'Recognized Psychiatric Injury' in Negligence Claims. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (1):77-112.score: 18.0
    The rules governing recovery for negligently inflicted psychiatric injury are among the most criticized of all of tort law. However, one area which, to date, has escaped with a minimum of judicial or academic scrutiny concerns the very threshold requirement for these actions: proof of a ‘recognized psychiatric illness’. This article critiques that longstanding requirement of English law from two perspectives. First, it is argued that the international classifications of psychiatric disorders (ICD-10 and DSM-IV) are being misapplied and misconstrued (...)
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  49. Michael E. Mytilinaios & Theodore A. Slaman (1988). Σ2-Collection and the Infinite Injury Priority Method. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):212 - 221.score: 18.0
    We show that the existence of a recursively enumerable set whose Turing degree is neither low nor complete cannot be proven from the basic axioms of first order arithmetic (P -) together with Σ 2 -collection (BΣ 2 ). In contrast, a high (hence, not low) incomplete recursively enumerable set can be assembled by a standard application of the infinite injury priority method. Similarly, for each n, the existence of an incomplete recursively enumerable set that is neither low n (...)
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  50. A. C. Sparkes (2005). When Narratives Matter: Men, Sport, and Spinal Cord Injury. Medical Humanities 31 (2):81-88.score: 18.0
    Next SectionExperiencing a spinal cord injury (SCI) and becoming disabled through sport is a major disruptive life event that instigates a multiplicity of difficult and complex issues that the person has to deal with. One of these problems is how to restory a life and construct new body/self relationships and identities over time. To explore this process, we focus on the life stories of a small group of men (n = 14) who have suffered SCI and become disabled through (...)
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