Search results for 'Innate Idea' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul M. Pietroski & Stephen Crain (2005). Innate Ideas. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge. 164--181.score: 64.0
    Here's one way this chapter could go. After defining the terms 'innate' and 'idea', we say whether Chomsky thinks any ideas are innate -- and if so, which ones. Unfortunately, we don't have any theoretically interesting definitions to offer; and, so far as we know, Chomsky has never said that any ideas are innate. Since saying that would make for a very short chapter, we propose to do something else. Our aim is to locate Chomsky, as (...)
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  2. Stephen P. Stich (ed.) (1975). Innate Ideas. University of California Press.score: 64.0
    Introduction: The Idea oflnnateness Philosophical controversies are notoriously long-lived. And in point of venerability the controversy around innate ideas ...
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  3. John Tooby, Leda Cosmides & H. Clark Barrett (2005). Resolving the Debate on Innate Ideas: Learnability Constraints and the Evolved Interpenetration of Motivational and Conceptual Functions. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. 305--337.score: 57.0
    In P. Carruthers, S. Laurence, & S. Stich (Eds.). The innate mind: Structure and content. (pp. 305-337). New York: Oxford University Press.
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  4. Noam A. Chomsky (1967). Recent Contributions to the Theory of Innate Ideas. Synthese 17 (March):2-11.score: 51.0
  5. Steve Stewart-Williams (2005). Innate Ideas as a Naturalistic Source of Metaphysical Knowledge. Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):791-814.score: 47.0
    This article starts from the assumption that there are various innate contributions to our view of the world and explores the epistemological implications that follow from this. Specifically, it explores the idea that if certain components of our worldview have an evolutionary origin, this implies that these aspects accurately depict the world. The simple version of the argument for this conclusion is that if an aspect of mind is innate, it must be useful, and the most parsimonious (...)
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  6. John Russell Roberts, Innate Ideas Without Abstract Ideas: An Essay on Berkeley's Platonism.score: 42.0
    Draft. Berkeley denied the existence of abstract ideas and any faculty of abstraction. At the same time, however, he embraced innate ideas and a faculty of pure intellect. This paper attempts to reconcile the tension between these commitments by offering an interpretation of Berkeley's Platonism.
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  7. M. J. Cain (2004). The Return of the Nativist. Philosophical Explorations 7 (1):1-20.score: 42.0
    Radical Concept Nativism (RCN) is the doctrine that most of our concepts are innate. In this paper I will argue in favour of RCN by developing a speculative account of concept acquisition that has considerable nativist credentials and can be defended against the most familiar anti-nativist objections. The core idea is that we have a whole battery of hard-wired dispositions that determine how we group together objects with which we interact. In having these dispositions we are effectively committed (...)
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  8. Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30:191-205.score: 37.0
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it is (...)
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  9. Murray Miles (1988). The Idea of Extension: Innate or Adventitious? On R. F. McRae's Interpretation of Descartes. Dialogue 27 (01):15-.score: 36.0
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  10. Hilary Putnam (1967). The 'Innateness Hypothesis' and Explanatory Models in Linguistics. Synthese 17 (March):12-22.score: 33.0
  11. Thomas Wasow (1973). The Innateness Hypothesis and Grammatical Relations. Synthese 26 (October):38-52.score: 33.0
  12. Ned Block (ed.) (1981). Readings In Philosophy Of Psychology, V. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.score: 30.0
    Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and ... V. Influence of imaged pictures and sounds on detection of visual and auditory signals. ...
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  13. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1974). Philosophy Of Psychology. London,: Macmillan.score: 30.0
  14. Howard M. Robinson (1988). A Dualist Perspective on Psychological Development. Philosophical Perspectives 2:119-139.score: 30.0
     
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  15. Peter Schwankl (1973). On the Phenomenology of the Unconscious. Human Context 5:318-329.score: 30.0
     
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  16. Douglas Greenlee (1972). Locke and the Controversy Over Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 33.score: 29.0
    Evidence, For the most part from books I and iv of locke's "essay concerning human understanding", Is presented to show that the issue about innate ideas as understood by locke was not primarily psychological but methodological. Locke's philosophic ire was directed against those who used the doctrine of innate ideas to advocate a close-Minded, As opposed to an open-Minded, Method of inquiry.
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  17. Nicholas Jolley (1988). Leibniz and Malebranche on Innate Ideas. Philosophical Review 97 (1):71-91.score: 28.0
    This paper seeks to reconstruct an important controversy between leibniz and malebranche over innate ideas. It is argued that this controversy is in some ways more illuminating than the better-Known debate between leibniz and locke, For malebranche's objections to innate ideas raise fundamental questions concerning the status of dispositions and the relationship between logic and psychology. The paper shows that in order to meet malebranche's objections, Leibniz adopts a strategy which is doubly reductionist: ideas are reduced to dispositions (...)
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  18. Frederick P. Van De Pitte (1985). Descartes' Innate Ideas. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):363-384.score: 28.0
    A careful examination of descartes' works shows that innate ideas are not born with the mind, But are generated by (i.E., Born within) the mind. This is descartes' way of talking about empirical concept formation, As well as what the mind can infer from these concepts. Particular examples are examined to provide the material and formal conditions for identifying innate ideas. Descartes forces the transition from medieval to very modern epistemology.
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  19. John Shand (2004). Innate Ideas and Immortality in Descartes and Locke. Locke Studies 4:47-58.score: 28.0
    This paper traces the connections between the assertion or denial of innate ideas, and the possibility of the soul being immortal, in the contrasting cases of Descartes and Locke. Descartes and Locke disagree about whether there are innate ideas and the nature of the soul, but they agree that the soul is immortal. The issue explored is which theory of the mind, Descartes's or Locke's, is in the best position to contend that we to survive death, and indeed (...)
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  20. John Walbridge (2014). A Response to Seyed N. Mousavian, "Did Suhrawardi Believe in Innate Ideas as A Priori Concepts? A Note". Philosophy East and West 64 (2):481-486.score: 28.0
    I should, I suppose, begin by taking some personal responsibility for this controversy. When my late friend Hossein Ziai and I published our edition and translation of Suhrawardī’s Ḥikmat al-Ishrāq (hereafter Philosophy of Illumination), we chose “innate” as our rendering of fiṭrī. I don’t remember discussing the rendering, and we did not bother to mention it in the glossary. Hossein had used this rendering in his first book, Knowledge and Illumination, stating that “innate ideas serve as the grounds (...)
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  21. Michele Merritt, Minimally Innate Ideas.score: 28.0
    This project provides a detailed examination and critique of current philosophical, linguistic, and cognitive accounts of first language acquisition. In particular, I focus on the concept of "innate" and how it is embraced, marginally utilized, or abandoned altogether in efforts to describe the way that a child comes to be a competent user of a language. A central question that naturally falls out of this general inquiry is therefore what exactly is supposed to be "innate," according to various (...)
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  22. Jon Miller (2001). Innate Ideas in Stoicism and Grotius. Grotiana 22 (1):157-175.score: 27.0
    Philosophers have long debated whether any ideas are innate in the human mind and if so, what they might be. The issues here are real and important but it often seems that the discussion of them isn’t. One of the main reasons that these discussions are frequently so frustrating is that the various sides seem to be talking past each other rather than engaging in genuine argument. When this happens, it seems to me that it is usually because the (...)
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  23. Diwakar Acharya (2014). On the Śaiva Concept of Innate Impurity (Mala) and the Function of the Rite of Initiation. Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (1):9-25.score: 27.0
    This paper tries to trace the roots of the Śaiva Mantramārga concept of innate impurity. Since innate impurity is regarded as one of the three bonds fettering bound individual souls, this paper begins with the Pāśupata and early Śaiva views on these bonds. It examines the Buddhist logician Dharmakīrti’s criticism of the Śaiva idea that initiation removes sin, and discusses the Pāśupata concept of sin-cleansing and two different concepts of innate impurity found in two early Śaiva (...)
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  24. Stephen P. Stich (1975). The Idea of Innateness. In , Innate Ideas. University of California Press. 1--22.score: 25.0
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  25. John Rogers, Innate Ideas and the Infinite: The Case of Locke and Descartes.score: 24.0
    Pierre Gassendi, who did not like nonsense, said of the idea of infinity: ‘if someone calls something "infinite" he attributes to a thing which he does not grasp a label which he does not understand’. Gassendi’s is a harsh judgement for, surely, we all do quite cheerfully and successfully use the concept of infinity, and in a variety of contexts. Yet if Gassendi’s judgement is too hard it is easy enough to have sympathy with his claim. For it is (...)
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  26. Murray Miles (2010). Analytic Method, the Cogito, and Descartes's Argument for the Innateness of the Idea of God. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):289-320.score: 24.0
    The analytic method by which Descartes discovered the first principle of his philosophy—cogito, ergo sum—is a unique cognitive process of direct insight and nonlogical inference. It differs markedly from inductive as well as deductive procedures, but also from older models of the direct noetic apprehension of first principles, notably those of Plato and Aristotle. However, a critical examination of Descartes’s argument for the innateness of the idea of God shows that there are serious obstacles in the way of his (...)
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  27. Giuseppe Giannetto (2011). Idee Innate E Ontologia Della Mente in Cartesio. La Scuola di Pitagora.score: 23.0
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  28. Samuel C. Rickless (2009). Marc A. Hight. Idea and Ontology: An Essay in Early Modern Metaphysics of Ideas. [REVIEW] Berkeley Studies 20:22-33.score: 22.0
    Marc A. Hight has given us a well-researched, well-written, analytically rigorous and thoughtprovoking book about the development of idea ontology in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The book covers a great deal of material, some in significant depth, some not. The figures discussed include Descartes, Malebranche, Arnauld, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Hume. Some might think it a tall order for anyone to grapple with the central works of these figures on a subject as fundamental as the nature of (...)
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  29. Jesse Prinz, Is Morality Innate?score: 21.0
    Thus declares Francis Hutcheson, expressing a view widespread during the Enlightenment, and throughout the history of philosophy. According to this tradition, we are by nature moral, and ourS concern for good and evil is as natural to us as our capacity to feel pleasure and pain. The link between morality and human nature has been a common theme since ancient times, and, with the rise of modern empirical moral psychology, it remains equally popular today. Evolutionary ethicists, ethologists, developmental psychologists, social (...)
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  30. Helen De Cruz (2007). An Enhanced Argument for Innate Elementary Geometric Knowledge and its Philosophical Implications. In Bart Van Kerkhove (ed.), New perspectives on mathematical practices. Essays in philosophy and history of mathematics. World Scientific.score: 21.0
    The idea that formal geometry derives from intuitive notions of space has appeared in many guises, most notably in Kant’s argument from geometry. Kant claimed that an a priori knowledge of spatial relationships both allows and constrains formal geometry: it serves as the actual source of our cognition of principles of geometry and as a basis for its further cultural development. The development of non-Euclidean geometries, however, seemed to definitely undermine the idea that there is some privileged relationship (...)
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  31. Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of learning in relation (...)
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  32. Sterling P. Lamprecht (1927). Locke's Attack Upon Innate Ideas. Philosophical Review 36 (2):145-165.score: 21.0
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  33. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2007). Linguistic Determinism and the Innate Basis of Number. In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Foundations and the Future.score: 21.0
    Strong nativist views about numerical concepts claim that human beings have at least some innate precise numerical representations. Weak nativist views claim only that humans, like other animals, possess an innate system for representing approximate numerical quantity. We present a new strong nativist model of the origins of numerical concepts and defend the strong nativist approach against recent cross-cultural studies that have been interpreted to show that precise numerical concepts are dependent on language and that they are restricted (...)
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  34. Paul Griffiths, The Distinction Between Innate and Acquired Characteristics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
    The idea that some characteristics of an organism are explained by the organism's intrinsic nature, whilst others reflect the influence of the environment is an ancient one. It has even been argued that this distinction is itself part of the evolved psychology of the human species. The distinction played an important role in the history of philosophy as the locus of the dispute between Rationalism and Empiricism discussed in another entry in this encyclopedia. This entry, however, focuses on twentieth-century (...)
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  35. Giorgio Tonelli (1974). Leibniz on Innate Ideas and the Early Reactions to the Publication of the Nouveaux Essais (1765). Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (4):437-454.score: 21.0
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  36. Anthony Savile (1972). Leibniz's Contribution to the Theory of Innate Ideas. Philosophy 47 (180):113 - 124.score: 21.0
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  37. Sterling P. Lamprecht (1926). Innate Ideas in the Cambridge Platonists. Philosophical Review 35 (6):553-573.score: 21.0
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  38. Nicholas Rescher (1966). A New Look at the Problem of Innate Ideas. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (3):205-218.score: 21.0
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  39. Bat-Ami Bar On (1987). Could There Be a Humean Sex-Neutral General Idea of Man? Philosophy Research Archives 13:367-377.score: 21.0
    In this paper I suggest that the Humean male and Humean female of Hume’s Treatise would have different mental lives due to a great extent to what Hume takes to be the socio-culture in place. Specifically, I show that the Humean male would be incapable but the Humean female would be capable of forming a Humean sex-neutral general idea of man. The Humean male’s inability is not innate but the result of the trauma he experiences when discovering sexuality, (...)
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  40. J. M. Katz (1966). Innate Ideas. In The Philosophy of Language. Harper & Row.score: 21.0
     
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  41. Raffaella de Rosa (2000). On Fodor's Claim That Classical Empiricists and Rationalists Agree on the Innateness of Ideas. Protosociology 14:240-269.score: 20.0
     
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  42. Maria Kronfeldner (2009). Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction. Medicine Studies 1 (2):167-181.score: 18.0
    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate?acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate?acquired distinction is (...)
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  43. Mark C. Baker (2006). The Innate Endowment for Language: Underspecified or Overspecified? In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Culture and Cognition. New York: Oxford University Press New York.score: 18.0
  44. Michael J. A. Howe, Jane W. Davidson & John A. Sloboda (1998). Innate Talents: Reality or Myth? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):399-407.score: 18.0
    Talents that selectively facilitate the acquisition of high levels of skill are said to be present in some children but not others. The evidence for this includes biological correlates of specific abilities, certain rare abilities in autistic savants, and the seemingly spontaneous emergence of exceptional abilities in young children, but there is also contrary evidence indicating an absence of early precursors of high skill levels. An analysis of positive and negative evidence and arguments suggests that differences in early experiences, preferences, (...)
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  45. Richard Dean (2013). Humanity as an Idea, as an Ideal, and as an End in Itself. Kantian Review 18 (2):171-195.score: 18.0
    Kant emphasizes that moral philosophy must be divided into two parts, a metaphysics of morals, and an empirical application to individuals, which Kant calls 'moral anthropology'. But Kant gives humanity (die Menschheit) a prominent role even in the purely rational part of ethics – for example, one formulation of the categorical imperative is a demand to treat humanity as an end in itself. This paper argues that the only concepts of humanity suited to play such a role are the rational (...)
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  46. Douglas Lewis (2007). Spinoza on Having a False Idea. Metaphysica 8 (1):17-27.score: 18.0
    Naturalism pervades Spinoza’s doctrines of The Ethics, but the contours of it often bewilder us. In this light, I consider the account of falsity, or having a false idea, as presented by Spinoza in Proposition thirty_five of the Second Part, its demonstration, and the subsequent note. Based on my interpretation I argue for the claim that his account has coherence and makes sense. Further, I examine the significance of what Spinoza says about falsity for comprehension of his philosophy overall, (...)
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  47. Mladen Turk (2013). Naturalistic Foundations of the Idea of the Holy: Darwinian Roots of Rudolf Otto's Theology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (35):248-263.score: 18.0
    The very influential theoretical concepts proposed by Rudolf Otto in his 1917 classic The Idea of the Holy are often seen as examples of properly religious content that cannot be approached by any other means except religious. This conclusion is challenged by closer readings of Otto’s writings on naturalism and religion where he, despite of being at times critical of some versions of naturalism, expresses his thorough commitment to naturalist ic explanations. Otto’s views are presented as compatible with recent (...)
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  48. Wangeng Zheng (2010). Tracing the Source of the Idea of Time in Yizhuan. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):51-67.score: 18.0
    By examining the propositions “waiting for the proper time to act”, “keeping up with the time”, “accommodating oneself to timeliness”, and “the meaning of a timely mean”, this paper examines the relationship between the idea of time conceived of in Yizhuan 易传 (Commentaries to the Book of Changes ), Zuozhuan 左传 (Annals of Spring and Autumn with Zuo Qiuming’s Commentaries) and Guoyu 国语 (Comments on State Affairs) as well as the related thoughts of Confucianism, Daoism and the Yin-Yang School. (...)
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  49. Kathryn Paxton George (1992). Moral and Nonmoral Innate Constraints. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):189-202.score: 18.0
    Charles J. Lumsden and E.O. Wilson, in their writings together and individually, have proposed that human behaviors, whether moral or nonmoral, are governed by innate constraints (which they have termed epigenetic rules). I propose that if a genetic component of moral behavior is to be discovered, some sorting out of specifically moral from nonmoral innate constraints will be necessary. That some specifically moral innate constraits exist is evidenced by virtuous behaviors exhibited in nonhuman mammals, whose behavior is (...)
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  50. Zhongjiang Wang (2011). Ultimate Concern, Reflection of Civilization, and the Idea of “Man” in Yin Haiguang. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):565-584.score: 18.0
    Yin Haiguang’s investigation and pursuit of the idea of “Man” reflect not merely a limited historical or parochial academic interest, but indeed address an ultimate concern of humanity which transcends any spatio-temporal limitations. In criticizing “modern man” for its faceless and non-self-identical figure, Yin Haiguang brings the conditions, purposes and noble values of humanity to light. His work has extraordinary significance for the highest aims of humanity and civilization.
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