Search results for 'Innate ideas (Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  68
    Steve Stewart-Williams (2005). Innate Ideas as a Naturalistic Source of Metaphysical Knowledge. Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):791-814.
    This article starts from the assumption that there are various innate contributions to our view of the world and explores the epistemological implications that follow from this. Specifically, it explores the idea that if certain components of our worldview have an evolutionary origin, this implies that these aspects accurately depict the world. The simple version of the argument for this conclusion is that if an aspect of mind is innate, it must be useful, and the most parsimonious explanation (...)
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  2.  8
    John Walbridge (2014). A Response to Seyed N. Mousavian, "Did Suhrawardi Believe in Innate Ideas as A Priori Concepts? A Note". Philosophy East and West 64 (2):481-486.
    I should, I suppose, begin by taking some personal responsibility for this controversy. When my late friend Hossein Ziai and I published our edition and translation of Suhrawardī’s Ḥikmat al-Ishrāq (hereafter Philosophy of Illumination), we chose “innate” as our rendering of fiṭrī. I don’t remember discussing the rendering, and we did not bother to mention it in the glossary. Hossein had used this rendering in his first book, Knowledge and Illumination, stating that “innate ideas serve as the (...)
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  3.  2
    Michele Merritt, Minimally Innate Ideas.
    This project provides a detailed examination and critique of current philosophical, linguistic, and cognitive accounts of first language acquisition. In particular, I focus on the concept of "innate" and how it is embraced, marginally utilized, or abandoned altogether in efforts to describe the way that a child comes to be a competent user of a language. A central question that naturally falls out of this general inquiry is therefore what exactly is supposed to be "innate," according to various (...)
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  4.  70
    Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of learning in relation (...)
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  5.  23
    Anthony Savile (1972). Leibniz's Contribution to the Theory of Innate Ideas. Philosophy 47 (180):113 - 124.
    Does Leibniz really worst Locke in respect of innate ideas, as is frequently supposed, or does Locke emerge more or less whole from their epistemological dispute? I shall here argue that Leibniz does far less well than we might like to believe and that his substantive proposals, where not entirely innocuous, contain little that would appeal to anyone interested in a modern form of the innateness thesis.
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  6. R. Edgley (1969). Innate Ideas: R. Edgley. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 3:1-33.
    Empiricism, the philosophical theory that all our ideas and knowledge are derived from experience, has in recent years been the target of radical and persuasive objections. In the seventeenth century, and for long after, rationalism seemed the only alternative to empiricism, but, like Kant, many contemporary philosophers have been convinced that empiricism and rationalism are equally unacceptable, and that both positions, and the conflict between them, are the result of trying to answer confused, misleading, and perhaps senseless questions. Of (...)
     
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  7.  17
    Seyed N. Mousavian (2014). Did Suhrawardi Believe in Innate Ideas as A Priori Concepts? A Note. Philosophy East and West 64 (2):473-480.
    In a past issue of Philosophy East and West (Aminrazavi 2003), Mehdi Aminrazavi, developing his ideas expressed earlier in Suhrawardi and the School of Illumination (Aminrazavi 1997), attempted to argue “that Ibn Sīnā’s peripatetic orientation and Suhrawardī’s ishrāqī perspective have both maintained and adhered to the same epistemological framework while the philosophical language in which their respective epistemologies are discussed is different” (Aminrazavi 2003, p. 203). I disagree; however, this is not the point I am going to address in (...)
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  8.  6
    Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30 (2):191-205.
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it is suggested (...)
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  9.  13
    Benjamin Hill (2010). Deborah Boyle, Descartes on Innate Ideas. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (4):242-245.
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  10. Isaac Watts, I. I. & W. (1733). Philosophical Essays on Various Subjects Viz. Space, Substance, Body, Spirit, the Operations of the Soul in Union with the Body, Innate Ideas, Perpetual Consciousness, Place and Motion of Spirits, the Departing Soul, the Resurrection of the Body, the Production and Operations of Plants and Animals. With Some Remarks on Mr. Locke's Essay on the Human Understanding. To Which is Subjoined a Brief Scheme of Ontology; or, the Science of Being in General with its Affections. [REVIEW] R. Ford and R. Hett.
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  11. Giuseppe Giannetto (2011). Idee Innate E Ontologia Della Mente in Cartesio. La Scuola di Pitagora.
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  12.  15
    Daniel E. Flage & Clarence A. Bonnen (1992). Innate Ideas and Cartesian Dispositions. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):65-80.
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  13.  38
    Giorgio Tonelli (1974). Leibniz on Innate Ideas and the Early Reactions to the Publication of the Nouveaux Essais (1765). Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (4):437-454.
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  14.  40
    Nicholas Rescher (1966). A New Look at the Problem of Innate Ideas. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (3):205-218.
  15. J. M. Katz (1966). Innate Ideas. In The Philosophy of Language. Harper & Row
  16.  15
    Timothy McGrew (1992). Unraveling Innate Ideas. History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (3):307 - 317.
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  17.  11
    Byron Kaldis (2011). Leibniz' Argument for Innate Ideas. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 281--289.
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  18.  12
    Daniel E. Flage & Clarence A. Bonnen (1992). Descartes and the Epistemology of Innate Ideas. History of Philosophy Quarterly 9 (1):19 - 33.
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  19.  6
    R. Edgley (1969). Innate Ideas. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 3:1-33.
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  20. Tad M. Schmaltz (1997). Descartes on Innate Ideas, Sensation, and Scholasticism: The Response to Regius. In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Clarendon Press
     
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  21. Peter Carruthers (1992). Human Knowledge and Human Nature: A New Introduction to an Ancient Debate. Oxford University Press.
    Contemporary debates in epistemology devote much attention to the nature of knowledge, but neglect the question of its sources. This book focuses on the latter, especially on the question of innateness. Carruthers' aim is to transform and reinvigorate contemporary empiricism, while also providing an introduction to a range of issues in the theory of knowledge. He gives a lively presentation and assessment of the claims of classical empiricism, particularly its denial of substantive a priori knowledge and of innate knowledge. (...)
     
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  22.  20
    Nancy Kendrick (2000). Why Cartesian Ideas of Sense Are Innate. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):413-428.
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  23.  4
    Catherine Kemp (2000). The Innateness Charge: Conception and Belief for Reid and Hume. Reid Studies 3 (2):43.
    Hume's notion of conception is closer to Reid's than Reid realizes and may lie behind Hume's charge in the letter to Hugh Blair (1762) that Reid's philosophy "leads us back to innate ideas".
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  24.  6
    Markku Roinila (2015). Jolley, Nicholas , Causality and Mind: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy . Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 35 (2):97-99.
    Causality and Mind presents seventeen of Nicholas Jolley's essays on early modern philosophy, which focus on two main themes. One theme is the continuing debate over the nature of causality in the period from Descartes to Hume. Jolley shows that, despite his revolutionary stance, Descartes did no serious re-thinking about causality; it was left to his unorthodox disciple Malebranche to argue that there is no place for natural causality in the new mechanistic picture of the physical world. Several essays explore (...)
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  25.  12
    Eirik Lang Harris (2016). Aspects of Shen Dao's Political Philosophy. History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (2):217-234.
    Even among those who work in the field of early Chinese philosophy,the name Shen Dao (慎到, ca. 360–285 BCe) rarely calls to mind much of interest, and what it does call up are often simply depictions of him in several of the more famous texts of the time: in the Han Feizi as an advocate of positional power; in the Xunzi as being blinded by a focus on laws; or in the Zhuangzi as one who wished to discard knowledge. Few (...)
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  26. Joshua Knobe & Shaun Nichols (2007). An Experimental Philosophy Manifesto. In Joshua Knobe & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Experimental Philosophy. Oxford University Press 3--14.
    It used to be a commonplace that the discipline of philosophy was deeply concerned with questions about the human condition. Philosophers thought about human beings and how their minds worked. They took an interest in reason and passion, culture and innate ideas, the origins of people’s moral and religious beliefs. On this traditional conception, it wasn’t particularly important to keep philosophy clearly distinct from psychology, history, or political science. Philosophers were concerned, in a very general way, with questions (...)
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  27. Kelby Mason, Chandra Sekhar Sripada & Stephen Stich (2008). The Philosophy of Psychology. In Dermot Moran (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Routledge
    The 20 sup > th /sup > century has been a tumultuous time in psychology -- a century in which the discipline struggled with basic questions about its intellectual identity, but nonetheless managed to achieve spectacular growth and maturation. It’s not surprising, then, that psychology has attracted sustained philosophical attention and stimulated rich philosophical debate. Some of this debate was aimed at understanding, and sometimes criticizing, the assumptions, concepts and explanatory strategies prevailing in the psychology of the time. But much (...)
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  28.  29
    David Rosenthal (2015). René Descartes’s Meditations on First Philosophy. Topoi 34 (2):541-548.
    The major goal of René Descartes’s rich and penetrating recent book, Meditations on First Philosophy, is to develop a methodology for the discovery of the truth, more specifically, a methodology that accommodates the dictates of a mathematical physics for our view of physical reality. Such a methodology must accordingly deal with and seek to defuse the apparent conflict between a mathematical physics and our commonsense picture of things, a conflict that continues to pose difficult challenges. Though much in the book (...)
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  29.  41
    Stephen Stich, The Philosophy of Psychology.
    The 20th century has been a tumultuous time in psychology – a century in which the discipline struggled with basic questions about its intellectual identity, but nonetheless managed to achieve spectacular growth and maturation. It’s not surprising, then, that psychology has attracted sustained philosophical attention and stimulated rich philosophical debate. Some of this debate was aimed at understanding, and sometimes criticizing, the assumptions, concepts and explanatory strategies prevailing in the psychology of the time. But much philosophical work has also been (...)
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  30. Nicholas Jolley (1998). The Light of the Soul: Theories of Ideas in Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes. Clarendon Press.
    The Light of the Soul examines the debate between Leibniz, Malebranche, and Descartes on the nature of ideas, which was crucial to the development of early modern thinking about the mind and knowledge. Nicholas Jolley guides the reader through the debate and considers its implications for a broad range of issues, such as innate ideas, self-knowledge, scepticism, the mind-body problem, and the creation of the eternal truths, which are as important to philosophy today as they were in (...)
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  31.  37
    Saul Traiger, IDEAS. Locke Used the Term "to Stand for Whatsoever is the Object of the Understanding When a Man Thinks.".
    Essay, Ii8) Although theorizing about ideas figures prominently in philosophy before him, Locke introduced what became known as the "New Way of Ideas," by considering all metaphysical and epistemological questions through an examination of the nature and origin of the mind's content. Although sometimes disagreeing with him on important details, other empiricists of the modern era follow Locke by first theorizing about the origin of ideas, and second by classifying ideas into types, based on origin and (...)
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  32. Veronique M. Foti (2013). Tracing Expression in Merleau-Ponty: Aesthetics, Philosophy of Biology, and Ontology. Northwestern University Press.
    The French philosopher Renaud Barbaras remarked that late in Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s career, “The phenomenology of perception fulfills itself as a philosophy of expression.” In _Tracing Expression in Merleau-Ponty: Aesthetics, Philosophy of Biology, and Ontology, _Véronique M. Fóti_ _addresses the guiding yet neglected theme of expression in Merleau-Ponty’s thought. She traces Merleau-Ponty’s ideas about how individuals express creative or artistic impulses through his three essays on aesthetics, his engagement with animality and the “new biology” in the second of his lecture (...)
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  33. Francis Hutcheson (2015). A System of Moral Philosophy: In Three Books. Cambridge University Press.
    Often described as the father of the Scottish Enlightenment, Francis Hutcheson was born in the north of Ireland to an Ulster-Scottish Presbyterian family. Organised into three 'books' that were divided between two volumes, A System of Moral Philosophy was his most comprehensive work. It synthesised ideas that he had formulated as a minister and as the Chair of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. Published posthumously by his son in 1755, prefaced by an account of his life, it (...)
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  34. Francis Hutcheson (2015). A System of Moral Philosophy 2 Volume Set: In Three Books. Cambridge University Press.
    Often described as the father of the Scottish Enlightenment, Francis Hutcheson was born in the north of Ireland to an Ulster-Scottish Presbyterian family. Organised into three 'books' that were divided between two volumes, A System of Moral Philosophy was his most comprehensive work. It synthesised ideas that he had formulated as a minister and as the Chair of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. Published posthumously by his son in 1755, prefaced by an account of his life, it (...)
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  35.  32
    Alexandrov Vladimir Ivanovich (2008). Перспектива существования метафизики и философии в XXI веке. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 4:109-116.
    The keynote idea of the theses is contained in the author’s assumption that modern philosophy doesn’t meet its claiming pretensions: to be universal form of knowledge. First of all philosophy is connected not with knowledge but with ideas and secondly being authentic it “exists only in everyday life”.1 In orderthat philosophy could realize its innate essence corresponding conditions of social being should exist but they are still absent and therefore philosophy is absent as well. Its place is occupied (...)
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  36. Christine James (2009). Language and Emotional Knowledge: A Case Study on Ability and Disability in Williams Syndrome. Biosemiotics 2 (2):151-167.
    Williams Syndrome provides a striking test case for discourses on disability, because the characteristics associated with Williams Syndrome involve a combination of “abilities” and “disabilities”. For example, Williams Syndrome is associated with disabilities in mathematics and spatial cognition. However, Williams Syndrome individuals also tend to have a unique strength in their expressive language skills, and are socially outgoing and unselfconscious when meeting new people. Children with Williams are said to be typically unafraid of strangers and show a greater interest in (...)
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  37. Marek Piechowiak (1992). W poszukiwaniu ontologicznych podstaw prawa. Arthura Kaufmanna teoria sprawiedliwości [In Search for Ontological Foundations of Law: Arthur Kaufmann’s Theory of Justice]. Instytut Nauk Prawnych PAN.
    Arthur Kaufmann is one of the most prominent figures among the contemporary philosophers of law in German speaking countries. For many years he was a director of the Institute of Philosophy of Law and Computer Sciences for Law at the University in Munich. Presently, he is a retired professor of this university. Rare in the contemporary legal thought, Arthur Kaufmann's philosophy of law is one with the highest ambitions — it aspires to pinpoint the ultimate foundations of law by explicitly (...)
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  38.  25
    Nicholas Jolley (1986). Leibniz. Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (1):129-130.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) was hailed by Bertrand Russell as "one of the supreme intellects of all time." A towering figure in Seventeenth century philosophy, his complex thought has been championed and satirized in equal measure, most famously in Voltaire's Candide. In this outstanding introduction to his philosophy, Nicholas Jolley introduces and assesses the whole of Leibniz's philosophy. Beginning with an introduction to Leibniz's life and work, he carefully introduces the core elements of Leibniz's metaphysics: his theories of substance, identity (...)
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  39.  8
    Author unknown, Earl of Shaftesbury. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  40.  64
    E. J. Lowe (2005). Locke. Routledge.
    John Locke (1632-1704) was one of the towering philosophers of the Enlightenment and arguably the greatest English philosopher. Many assumptions we now take for granted, about liberty, knowledge and government, come from Locke and his most influential works, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Two Treatises of Government . In this superb introduction to Locke's thought, EJ Lowe covers all the major aspects of his philosophy. Whilst sensitive to the Seventeenth century background to Locke's thought, he concentrates on introducing and (...)
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  41.  19
    Diane B. Paul & Benjamin Day (2008). John Stuart Mill, Innate Differences, and the Regulation of Reproduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (2):222-231.
    In this paper, we show that the question of the relative importance of innate characteristics and institutional arrangements in explaining human difference was vehemently contested in Britain during the first half of the nineteenth century. Thus Sir Francis Galton’s work of the 1860s should be seen as an intervention in a pre-existing controversy. The central figure in these earlier debates—as well as many later ones—was the philosopher and economist John Stuart Mill. In Mill’s view, human nature was fundamentally shaped (...)
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  42. William Sweet (2006). Maritain's Metaphysics and Natural Law Theory of Knowledge Base. Philosophy and Culture 33 (9):15-33.
    Today's ethical theory , both utilitarian and non-ontological theories dominated. However, we found that many of its subsequent development in the evolution of those who encourage virtue ethics, feminist care theory, social contract theory and the theory of rights-based build. But usually lacking in this discussion - the teaching of ethics by the majority of it seems - is the natural law theory. Natural law theory has its very long history, starting from the Stoic school, it had occupied in the (...)
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  43.  60
    Lawrence Nolan (1997). The Ontological Status of Cartesian Natures. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (2):169–194.
    In the Fifth Meditation, Descartes makes a remarkable claim about the ontological status of geometrical figures. He asserts that an object such as a triangle has a 'true and immutable nature' that does not depend on the mind, yet has being even if there are no triangles existing in the world. This statement has led many commentators to assume that Descartes is a Platonist regarding essences and in the philosophy of mathematics. One problem with this seemingly natural reading is that (...)
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  44. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
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  45.  7
    Franklin Perkins (2007). Leibniz: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.
    READING LEIBNIZ. Context of Leibniz's philosophy -- Difficulties of reading Leibniz -- Using this book -- GOD AND THE BEST POSSIBLE WORLD. Two principles of knowledge -- The existence of god -- The nature of God -- The best of all possible worlds -- SUBSTANCES. Substance in early modern philosophy -- The simplicity and unity of substance in Leibniz -- Substances as points of view on the universe -- Interaction and pre-established harmony -- RATIONAL MINDS. Minute perceptions and levels of (...)
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  46. Harold Morick (1972). Challenges to Empiricism. Belmont, Calif.,Wadsworth Pub. Co..
    Carnap, R. Empiricism, semantics, and ontology.--Quine, W. V. Two dogmas of empiricism. Meaning and translation.--Sellars, W. Empiricism and the philosophy of mind.--Putnam, H. Brains and behaviour.--Popper, K. R. Science: conjectures and refutations.--Feyerabend, P. K. Science without experience. How to be a good empiricist--a plea for tolerance in matters epistemological.--Kuhn, T. S. Incommensurability and paradigms.--Hesse, M. Duhem, Quine and a new empiricism.--Chomsky, N. Recent contributions to the theory of innate ideas.--Putnam, H. The innateness hypothesis and explanatory models in linguistics.--Goodman, (...)
     
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  47.  17
    Julie R. Klein (2003). The Question of Pantheism in the Second Objections to Descartes's Meditations. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (3):357-379.
    Through a close analysis of texts from the Second Objections and Replies to the Meditations, this article addresses the tension between the pursuit of certainty and the preservation of divine transcendence in Descartes’s philosophy. Via a hypothetical “atheist geometer,” the Objectors charge Descartes with pantheism. While the Objectors’ motivations are not clear, the objection raises provocative questions about the relation of the divine and the human mind and about the being of created or dependent entities inDescartes’s metaphysics. Descartes contends that (...)
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  48. Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.) (2011). A Companion to Descartes. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A collection of more than 30 specially commissioned essays, this volume surveys the work of the 17th-century philosopher-scientist commonly regarded as the founder of modern philosophy, while integrating unique essays detailing the context and impact of his work. Covers the full range of historical and philosophical perspectives on the work of Descartes Discusses his seminal contributions to our understanding of skepticism, mind-body dualism, self-knowledge, innate ideas, substance, causality, God, and the nature of animals Explores the philosophical significance of (...)
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  49. Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.) (2007). A Companion to Descartes. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A collection of more than 30 specially commissioned essays, this volume surveys the work of the 17th-century philosopher-scientist commonly regarded as the founder of modern philosophy, while integrating unique essays detailing the context and impact of his work. Covers the full range of historical and philosophical perspectives on the work of Descartes Discusses his seminal contributions to our understanding of skepticism, mind-body dualism, self-knowledge, innate ideas, substance, causality, God, and the nature of animals Explores the philosophical significance of (...)
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  50. Janet Broughton & John Carriero (eds.) (2010). A Companion to Descartes. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A collection of more than 30 specially commissioned essays, this volume surveys the work of the 17th-century philosopher-scientist commonly regarded as the founder of modern philosophy, while integrating unique essays detailing the context and impact of his work. Covers the full range of historical and philosophical perspectives on the work of Descartes Discusses his seminal contributions to our understanding of skepticism, mind-body dualism, self-knowledge, innate ideas, substance, causality, God, and the nature of animals Explores the philosophical significance of (...)
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