Search results for 'Insanity' (try it on Scholar)

226 found
Sort by:
  1. Steven R. Smith (2012). Neuroscience, Ethics and Legal Responsibility: The Problem of the Insanity Defense. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):475-481.score: 24.0
    The insanity defense presents many difficult questions for the legal system. It attracts attention beyond its practical significance (it is seldom used successfully) because it goes to the heart of the concept of legal responsibility. “Not guilty by reason of insanity” generally requires that as a result of mental illness the defendant was unable to distinguish right from wrong at the time of the crime. The many difficult and complex questions presented by the insanity defense have led (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Daniel N. Robinson (1996). Wild Beasts and Idle Humours: The Insanity Defense From Antiquity to the Present. Harvard Univ. Press.score: 24.0
    "An American psychologist, Daniel N. Robinson, traces the development of the insanity plea...[He offers] an assured historical survey." Roy Porter, The Times [UK] "Wild Beasts and Idle Humours is truly unique. It synthesizes material that I do not believe has ever been considered in this context, and links up the historical past with contemporaneous values and politics. Robinson effortlessly weaves religious history, literary history, medical history, and political history, and demonstrates how the insanity defense cannot be fully understood (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael S. Moore (forthcoming). The Quest for a Responsible Responsibility Test: Norwegian Insanity Law After Breivik. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-49.score: 24.0
    The Breivik case in Norway has motivated a reassessment of Norwegian insanity law by the Norwegian government. Because Norway since 2002 has utilized a “medical model” for legal insanity—a model according to which the legal excuse of insanity is identified with some medical concept such as psychosis—the Norwegian reexamination of its law is not without interest throughout the world. In this paper, I utilize the Anglo-American experience with different medical models for insanity to assess the current (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Steve Matthews (2004). Failed Agency and the Insanity Defence. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27:413-424.score: 24.0
    In this article I argue that insanity defences such as M’Nagten should be abolished in favour of a defence of failed agency. It is not insanity per se, or any other empirical condition, which constitutes the moral reason for exculpation. Rather, we should first recognize the conditions for being a responsible moral agent. These include some capacity to direct and control one’s behavior, a non-delusional component, and the capacity to recognize that one’s behavior is expressive of what they (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Dominic Murphy (2005). Can Evolution Explain Insanity? Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):745-766.score: 21.0
    I distinguish three evolutionary explanations of mental illness: first, breakdowns in evolved computational systems; second, evolved systems performing their evolutionary function in a novel environment; third, evolved personality structures. I concentrate on the second and third explanations, as these are distinctive of an evolutionary psychopathology, with progressively less credulity in the light of the empirical evidence. General morals are drawn for evolutionary psychiatry.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Herbert Fingarette (1972). Insanity and Responsibility. Inquiry 15 (1-4):6 – 29.score: 18.0
    This paper attempts to set forth, in the context of Anglo-U.S. criminal law, the meaning of the concept of insanity, its necessary relation to absence of responsibility, and its bearing on some relevant psychiatric concepts and legal controversies. Irrationality is a distinctive and necessary (but not sufficient) condition for insanity. Irrationality consists in failure even to grasp the relevance of what is 'essentially' relevant. To that extent there obviously can be no responsibility. A mental makeup which renders one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard J. Bonnie (2010). Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):760-763.score: 18.0
    The determinative issue in applying the insanity defense is whether the defendant experienced a legally relevant functional impairment at the time of the offense. Categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of mental disease is clinically and morally arbitrary because it may lead to unfair conviction of a defendant with a personality disorder who actually experienced severe, legally relevant impairments at the time of the crime. There is no need to consider such a drastic approach in most states (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lee S. Weinberg & Richard E. Vatz (1982). The Insanity Plea: Szaszian Ethics and Epistemology. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (3):417-433.score: 18.0
    The traditional legal verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity as well as the more recent verdict of guilty but mentally ill rest on often unquestioned epistemological assumptions about human behavior and its causes, unjustified reliance on forensic psychiatrists, and questionable, if not deplorable ethical standards. This paper offers a critique of legal perspectives on insanity, historical and current, based on the altermative epistemological and ethical assumptions of Thomas S. Szasz. In addition, we examine Szasz''s unique rhetorical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Hung-Yul So (2007). Beyond Rational Insanity. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:221-227.score: 18.0
    Insanity is identified with irrationality, while rationality is considered to be the mark of sanity. Yet we want to say that rationality could be the cause of insanity. We can see a subtle kind of insanity inherent in an institution believed to be highly rational. Rationality in an ideological belief also turns into rational insanity when the ideology itself works for the interest of the advantaged as a tool of deception. We believe in the rationality of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. R. Hamilton (1986). Insanity Legislation. Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (1):13-17.score: 18.0
    The McNaughton Rules, which are used when someone pleads insanity at the time of a homicide, are out of date and unsatisfactory. Suggestions have been made about how the insanity defence can be reformulated. The preference of a defence of diminished responsibility means abandoning an ancient and humane principle of not convicting those who are so mentally disordered as not to be responsible for their actions. There is a need for Parliament to consider changes to the law both (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Dale Cannon (2008). “Polanyi's Influence on Poteat's Conceptualization of Modernity's 'Insanity' and Its Cure. Tradition and Discovery 35 (2):23-30.score: 18.0
    My intent is to paint in rather broad strokes Bill Poteat’s intellectual agenda, as I came to understand it, and how Michael Polanyi fit into that agenda for Poteat alongside other major intellectual mentors. Bill’s agenda was to expose critically and, so far as possible, to counter the fateful consequences of what he called the “prepossessions of the European Enlightenment” regarding human knowing, human doing, and human being. Although his work involved conceptual analysis, the nature of this conceptual-archaeology was far (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. James Goudkamp (2011). Insanity as a Tort Defence. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 31 (4):727-754.score: 18.0
    Unlike the criminal law, tort law does not recognize insanity as an answer to liability. The fact that a defendant was insane at the time of his impugned conduct is essentially ignored by tort law's liability rules. It will be argued that this situation is unsatisfactory. A person should not incur liability in tort in respect of acts committed while insane. This result should be realized by providing for a generally applicable affirmative defence of insanity.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Lawrie Reznek (1997). Evil or Ill?: Justifying the Insanity Defence. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Lawrie Reznek addresses these questions and more in his controversial investigation of the insanity defense in Evil or Ill ? Drawing from countless intriguing case examples, he aims to understand the concept of an excuse, and explains why the law excuses certain actions and not others. In his easily accessible and elegant style, he explains that in law, there exists two excuses derived from Aristotle: the excuses of ignorance and compulsion. Reznek, however proposes a third excuse - the excuse (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David Faraci & David Shoemaker (2010). Insanity, Deep Selves, and Moral Responsibility: The Case of JoJo. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3): 319-332.score: 16.0
    Susan Wolf objects to the Real Self View (RSV) of moral responsibility that it is insufficient, that even if one’s actions are expressions of one’s deepest or “real” self, one might still not be morally responsible for one’s actions. As a counterexample to the RSV, Wolf offers the case of JoJo, the son of a dictator, who endorses his father’s (evil) values, but who is insane and is thus not responsible for his actions. Wolf’s data for this conclusion derives from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Friedrich Nietzsche, Letters of Insanity (Nietzsche).score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Sally Swartz (1995). Colonizing the Insane: Causes of Insanity in the Cape, 1891-1920. History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):39-57.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter K. Klein (1998). Insanity and the Sublime: Aesthetics and Theories of Mental Illness in Goya's Yard with Lunatics and Related Works. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 61:198-252.score: 15.0
  18. R. B. Brandt (1988). The Insanity Defense and the Theory of Motivation. Law and Philosophy 7 (2):123 - 146.score: 15.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jennifer Radden (1982). Diseases as Excuses: Durham and the Insanity Plea. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 42 (3):349 - 362.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Frances Myrna Kamm (1987). The Insanity Defense, Innocent Threats, and Limited Alternatives. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (1):61-76.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Brian O'Shaughnessy (1955). Irrationality and Insanity. Philosophical Studies 6 (5):72 - 74.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. James B. Brady (1997). Carl Elliott, the Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (4):579-581.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. George J. Alexander (1982). Freedom and Insanity. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (3):343-350.score: 15.0
    The paper describes the refusal of the liberal community to assert the right of persons accused of mental illness to be free of coercive psychiatric intrusion. It suggests that the penchant for benevolent governmental intrusion into other social problems may be at fault and recommends that intervention be abandoned in favor of a return to human autonomy as a basis of the concept of freedom.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Carl Elliott & Grant Gillett (1992). Moral Insanity and Practical Reason. Philosophical Psychology 5 (1):53 – 67.score: 15.0
    The psychopathic personality disorder historically has been thought to include an insensitivity to morality. Some have thought that the psychopath's insensitivity indicates that he does not understand morality, but the relationship between the psychopath's defects and moral understanding has been unclear. We attempt to clarify this relationship, first by arguing that moral understanding is incomplete without concern for morality, and second, by showing that the psychopath demonstrates defects in frontal lobe activity which indicate impaired attention and adaptation to environmental conditions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel Moseley (2009). Review of E. Fuller Torrey, "The Insanity Offense&Quot;. [REVIEW] Metapsychology.score: 15.0
  26. Frank Kortmann (1998). Elliott, C.: 1996, The Rules of Insanity; Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):178-179.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. R. S. Downie (1997). The Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill Offender. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):196-197.score: 15.0
  28. Herbert Morris (1974). Criminal Insanity. Inquiry 17 (1-4):345-355.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Timothy Lang (2002). Lord Acton and "the Insanity of Nationality". Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (1):129-149.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Timo Airaksinen (1989). Insanity, Crime and the Structure of Freedom in Hegel. Social Theory and Practice 15 (2):155-178.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Andrew Cutrofello (1993). A History of Reason in the Age of Insanity. The Owl of Minerva 25 (1):15-21.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. C. Elliott (1991). The Rules of Insanity: Commentary On: Psychopathic Disorder: A Category Mistake? Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (2):89-90.score: 15.0
    This paper addresses Colin Holmes's suggestion that the psychopathic disorder is best regarded not as a psychiatric concept, but as an ethical one. The paper argues that the concept of psychopathy, like many other concepts, can span both psychiatry and ethics, and that it is not clear what removing if from the realm of psychiatry would entail. Also, the question of whether the concept of psychopathy is useful for psychiatrists must be separated from the question of whether psychopaths should be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ernest Van Den Haag (1984). The Insanity Defense. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (1):3-11.score: 15.0
  34. Daniel N. Robinson (1994). Wild Beasts and Idle Humours: Legal Insanity and the Finding of Fault. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 37:159-.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Bernard Hart (1926). Emotion and Insanity. By S. Thalbitzer. (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., 1926. Pp. X + 126. Price 7s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 1 (03):391-.score: 15.0
  36. Thomas R. Litwack (1984). The Moral Foundations of the Insanity Defense. Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (1):12-19.score: 15.0
  37. Merold Westphal (1971). Kierkegaard and the Logic of Insanity. Religious Studies 7 (3):193 - 211.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Willard Bohn (1993). Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought (Review). Philosophy and Literature 17 (2):367-368.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Sidney Gendin (1973). Insanity and Criminal Responsibility. American Philosophical Quarterly 10 (2):99 - 110.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Gabriel M. A. Segal (2013). Alcoholism, Disease, and Insanity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):297-315.score: 15.0
  41. Robert Fahrnkopf (1979). Cartesian Insanity. Analysis 39 (2):68 - 70.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alex Hardie (2000). Furor Poeticus D. Hershkowitz: The Madness of Epic. Reading Insanity From Homer to Statius . Pp. XIII + 346. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. Cased, £45. Isbn: 0-19-815245-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):109-.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Wolfgang Kretschmer (1968). Genius, Insanity and Fame. Philosophy and History 1 (2):179-180.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Elisabeth Boetzkes (1992). Robert F. Schopp, Automatism, Insanity, and the Psychology of Criminal Responsibility Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (4):294-296.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Andrea Cucchiarelli (2011). Opportune Insanity: An Interpolation in Horace, Carmina 4.12.25–8. Classical Quarterly 61 (01):316-319.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Barry A. Harvey (1994). Insanity, Theocracy, and the Public Realm: Public Theology, the Church, and the Politics of Liberal Democracy. Modern Theology 10 (1):27-57.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. W. D. Morrison (1894). Book Review:Suicide and Insanity. S. A. K. Strahan. [REVIEW] Ethics 5 (1):128-.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ronald Bayer (1983). The Insanity Defense in Retreat. Hastings Center Report 13 (6):13-16.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. R. J. Gerber (1975). Is the Insanity Test Insane? American Journal of Jurisprudence 20 (1):111-140.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 226