Search results for 'Intellect' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Active Intellect (2002). Sinful, as a Sin 40, 53 Vicious, Bad 33, 63, 87, 176 Virtuous, Good 33, 89, 176, 177,209 Active Intellect. In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer 1--327.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   461 citations  
  3.  38
    Gary Hatfield (1997). The Workings of the Intellect: Mind and Psychology. In Patricia Easton (ed.), Logic and the Workings of the Mind: The Logic of Ideas and Faculty Psychology in Early Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Co 21-45.
    Two stories have dominated the historiography of early modern philosophy: one in which a seventeenth century Age of Reason spawned the Enlightenment, and another in which a skeptical crisis cast a shadow over subsequent philosophy, resulting in ever narrower "limits to knowledge." I combine certain elements common to both into a third narrative, one that begins by taking seriously seventeenth-century conceptions of the topics and methods central to the rise of a "new" philosophy. In this revisionist story, differing approaches to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  4. Caleb Cohoe (2013). Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4. Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  36
    Carlo Vercellone (2007). From Formal Subsumption to General Intellect: Elements for a Marxist Reading of the Thesis of Cognitive Capitalism. Historical Materialism 15 (1):13-36.
    Since the crisis of Fordism, capitalism has been characterised by the ever more central role of knowledge and the rise of the cognitive dimensions of labour. This is not to say that the centrality of knowledge to capitalism is new per se. Rather, the question we must ask is to what extent we can speak of a new role for knowledge and, more importantly, its relationship with transformations in the capital/labour relation. From this perspective, the paper highlights the continuing validity (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6.  91
    Herbert A. Davidson (1992). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes on Intellect: Their Cosmologies, Theories of the Active Intellect, and Theories of Human Intellect. Oxford University Press.
    A study of problems, all revolving around the subject of intellect in the philosophies of Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, this book starts by reviewing discussions in Greek and early Arabic philosophy which served as the background for the three Arabic thinkers. Davidson examines the cosmologies and theories of human and active intellect in the three philosophers and covers such subjects as: the emanation of the supernal realm from the First Cause; the emanation of the lower world from the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  7.  14
    John Sellars (2015). Pomponazzi Contra Averroes on the Intellect. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):45-66.
    This paper examines Pomponazzi's arguments against Averroes in his De Immortalitate Animae, focusing on the question whether thought is possible without a body. The first part of the paper will sketch the history of the problem, namely the interpretation of Aristotle's remarks about the intellect in De Anima 3.4-5, touching on Alexander, Themistius, and Averroes. The second part will focus on Pomponazzi's response to Averroes, including his use of arguments by Aquinas. It will conclude by suggesting that Pomponazzi's discussion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  30
    Miira Tuominen (2010). Receptive Reason: Alexander of Aphrodisias on Material Intellect. Phronesis 55 (2):170-190.
    According to Alexander of Aphrodisias, our potential intellect is a purely receptive capacity. Alexander also claims that, in order for us to actualise our intellectual potentiality, the intellect needs to abstract what is intelligible from enmattered perceptible objects. Now a problem emerges: How is it possible for a purely receptive capacity to perform such an abstraction? It will be argued that even though Alexander's reaction to this question causes some tension in his theory, the philosophical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  13
    Kienhow Goh (2013). Schopenhauer on the Role of the Intellect in Human Cognition. Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (2).
    In Schopenhauer’s thought, the will’s primacy over the intellect seems to suggest that the intellect plays no role in determining what we do. I provide an alternative picture of the intellect as actively deliberating and choosing in abstract cognition from what it passively receives from the will in natural cognition.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Marleen Rozemond (1993). The Role of the Intellect in Descartes's Case for the Incorporeity of the Mind. In Stephen Voss (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy and Science of René Descartes.
    I argue that Descartes's best known argument for dualism relies on claims about intellectual activity and not on claims about mental states generally to establish dualism. I explain that this must be so give his historical context, where arguments for the immateriality of the mind on the basis of the intellect were common. But sensation and other non-intellectual states were regarded as pertaining to the body-soul composite.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  12
    Yael Raizman-Kedar (2009). The Intellect Naturalized: Roger Bacon on the Existence of Corporeal Species Within the Intellect. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):131-157.
    In this paper I challenge the claim that Bacon considered the operation of species as limited to the physical and sensory levels and demonstrate that in his view, the very same species issued by physical objects operate within the intellect as well. I argue that in Bacon the concept of illumination plays a secondary role in the acquisition of knowledge, and that he regarded innate knowledge as dispositional and confused. What was left as the main channel through which knowledge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  8
    John Dillon (2010). Intellect and the One in Porphyrys Sententiae. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):27-35.
    This article seeks to provide some support for the troublesome report of Damascius in the De Principiis that, for Porphyry, the first principle is the Father of the Noetic Triad—and thus more closely implicated with the realm of Intellect and Being than would seem proper for a Neoplatonist and faithful follower of Plotinus. And yet there is evidence from other sources that Porphyry did not abandon the concept of a One above Being. A clue to the complexity of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    Antonio Gómez Villar (2014). Paolo Virno, lector de Marx: General Intellect, biopolítica y éxodo. Isegoría 50:305-318.
    Este trabajo pretende mostrar que la suspensión es la temporalidad inmanente a la noción de éxodo en Paolo Virno, a través de la potencia negativa tal como es entendida en el pensamiento de G. Agamben. La argumentación se articulará en tres momentos: en primer lugar, atenderemos a la lectura de “El Fragmento de las máquinas” de los Grundrisse de Marx que realiza Paolo Virno, en la que sostiene que la propia naturaleza del General Intellect implica que una parte importante (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Therese Scarpelli Cory (2015). Averroes and Aquinas on the Agent Intellect's Causation of Intelligibles. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 82:1-60.
    This article examines two medieval thinkers—Averroes and Aquinas—on the kind of causation exercised by the agent intellect in “abstracting” or producing intelligibles from images in the imagination. It argues that abstraction in these thinkers should be interpreted in causal terms, as an act whereby images in the imagination, through the power of the agent intellect, educe their intelligible likeness in a receptive intellect. This Averroan-Thomistic causal approach to abstraction offers an intriguing alternative to the usual approach to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  12
    Joseph M. Magee (2003). Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs. Greenwood Press.
  16.  35
    John E. Naus (1959). The Nature of the Practical Intellect According to Saint Thomas Aquinas. Roma, Università Gregoriana.
    CHAPTER I SPECULATIVE AND PRACTICAL INTELLECT In the Summa Theologiae, St. Thomas devotes an entire article to answering the question, «Whether the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  7
    M. C. Pacheco & J. Meirinhos (eds.) (2004). Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale. Actes du XIe Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la S.I.E.P.M., Porto du 26 au 31 Août 2002. Brepols.
    Le XI.ème Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale pour l’Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale (S.I.E.P.M..) s’est déroulé à Porto (Portugal), du 26 au 30 août 2002, sous le thème général: Intellect et Imagination dans la Philosophie Médiévale. A partir des héritages platonicien, aristotélicien, stoïcien, ou néo-platonicien (dans leurs variantes grecques, latines, arabes, juives), la conceptualisation et la problématisation de l’imagination et de l’intellect, ou même des facultés de l’âme en général, apparaissaient comme une ouverture possible (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Adam Takahashi (2008). Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):451-481.
    The Dominican theologian Albert the Great was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, “every work of nature is the work of intelligence” , expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). “’Christus Secundum Spiritum’: Spinoza, Jesus, and the Infinite Intellect”. In Neta Stahl (ed.), The Jewish Jesus. Routledge
  20.  21
    Paolo Virno (2007). General Intellect. Historical Materialism 15 (3):3-8.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  21. Eleonore Stump (1990). Intellect, Will, and the Principle of Alternative Possibilities. In M. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press 254-285.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  22.  4
    Pieter Lemmens (forthcoming). Social Autonomy and Heteronomy in the Age of ICT: The Digital Pharmakon and the Empowerment of the General Intellect. Foundations of Science:1-10.
    ‘The art of living with ICTs ’ today not only means finding new ways to cope, interact and create new lifestyles on the basis of the new digital technologies individually, as ‘consumer-citizens’. It also means inventing new modes of living, producing and, not in the least place, struggling collectively, as workers and producers. As the so-called digital revolution unfolds in the context of a neoliberal cognitive and consumerist capitalism, its ‘innovations’ are predominantly employed to modulate and control both production processes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  64
    Charles A. Campbell (1953). Ryle on the Intellect. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (April):115-38.
  24. Thomas (1968). On the Unity of the Intellect Against the Averroists. Milwaukee, Marquette University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25. John Bussanich & Plotinus (1988). The One and its Relation to Intellect in Plotinus a Commentary on Selected Texts. Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  5
    John M. McDermott (1983). Love and Understanding: The Relation of Will and Intellect in Pierre Rousselot's Christological Vision. Università Gregoriana.
    Abridgement of thesis (doctoral)--Gregorian University, Rome.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27. Mortimer J. Adler (1993). Intellect: Mind Over Matter. Noûs 27 (3):406-408.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  5
    André Laks (2010). Les fonctions de l'intellect. Methodos 2.
    Cet article est disponible en texte intégral en format PDF.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    M. A. B. Degenhardt (1991). Art and Intellect. Studies in Philosophy and Education 11 (2):135-148.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Henri Baten & Carlos G. Steel (1993). On the Nature of Matter on the Intellect as Form of Man.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Henri Baten, Carlos G. Steel & âemile van de Vyver (1994). On the Unity of Intellect on the Platonic Doctrine of the Ideas.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Francis P. Clarke (1928). The Intellect in the Philosophy of St. Thomas. Philadelphia.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Clara Cooper (1935/1972). The Relation Between Morality and Intellect. Ams Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Kevin Corrigan (1987). Amelius, Plotinus and Porphyry on Being, Intellect, and the One a Reappraisal. --. W. De Gruyter.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Edward Quinlisk Franz (1950). The Thomistic Doctrine on the Possible Intellect. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Ralph M. Mcinerny & Thomas (1993). Aquinas Against the Averroists on There Being Only One Intellect. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  5
    Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) (2004). Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 Août 2002. [REVIEW] Brepols.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. John Philoponus (1991). On Aristotle on the Intellect (De Anima 3.4-8). Cornell University Press.
  39.  83
    Mor Segev (2014). 'Obviously All This Agrees with My Will and My Intellect': Schopenhauer on Active and Passive Nous in Aristotle's De Anima Iii.5. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):535-556.
    In one of the unpublished parts of his manuscript titled the Spicilegia, Arthur Schopenhauer presents an uncharacteristically sympathetic reading of an Aristotelian text. The text in question, De anima III. 5, happens to include the only occurrence of arguably the most controversial idea in Aristotle, namely the distinction between active and passive nous. Schopenhauer interprets these two notions as corresponding to his own notions of the ?will? and the ?intellect? or ?subject of knowledge?, respectively. The result is a unique (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Gyula Klima (2009). Aquinas on the Materiality of the Human Soul and the Immateriality of the Human Intellect. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):163-182.
    This paper argues that Aquinas's conception of the human soul and intellect offers a consistent alternative to the dilemma of materialism and post-Cartesian dualism. It also argues that in their own theoretical context, Aquinas' arguments for the materiality of the human soul and immateriality of the intellect provide a strong justification of his position. However, that theoretical context is rather "alien" to ours in contemporary philosophy. The conclusion of the paper will point in the direction of what can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Lloyd Gerson (2004). The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima. Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42. Mark J. Nyvlt (2011). Aristotle and Plotinus on the Intellect: Monism and Dualism Revisited. Lexington Books.
    The scope of this book is to revisit the ancient Aristotelian and Plotinian philosophical and metaphysical problem of dualism and monism with respect to the first principle. Essentially, it defends Aristotle’s position of the primacy of an intelligible first principle over the Plotinian philosophical move to affirm a principle above Intellect.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  41
    Nicholas Jolley (1994). Intellect and Illumination in Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):209-224.
    One of the hallmarks of Descartes' philosophy is the doctrine that the human mind has a faculty of pure intellect. This doctrine is so central to Descartes' teaching that it is difficult to believe that any of his disciplines would abandon it. Yet this is what happened in the case of Malebranche. This paper argues that in his later philosophy Malebranche adopted a theory of divine illumination which leaves no room for a Cartesian doctrine of pure intellect. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  10
    Filip Karfík (2011). L'âme logos de l'intellect et le logismos de l'âme. À propos des Ennéades V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. Chôra 9:67-80.
    The paper raises the question of the relationship between the description of the soul as logos and the description of its cognitive activities as logismos in Plotinus’ Enneads V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. It first offers an interpretation of the definition of the soul as a logos of the intellect in V, 1 [10]. Then it scrutinises the use of the terms logismos and logizesthai in the same treatise and compares it to a similar use of these (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  11
    Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson (2007). Plotinus on Intellect. Oxford University Press.
    Plotinus (205-269 AD) led the philosophical movement of Neoplatonism, which reinterpreted Plato's thought later in antiquity and went on to become a dominant force in the history of ideas. Emilsson's in-depth study of Plotinus' central doctrine of Intellect caters for the increasing interest in Plotinus with philosophical clarity and rigor.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  8
    Filip Karfík (2011). L'âme logos de l'intellect et le logismos de l'âme. À propos des Ennéades V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. Chôra 9:67-80.
    The paper raises the question of the relationship between the description of the soul as logos and the description of its cognitive activities as logismos in Plotinus’ Enneads V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. It first offers an interpretation of the definition of the soul as a logos of the intellect in V, 1 [10]. Then it scrutinises the use of the terms logismos and logizesthai in the same treatise and compares it to a similar use of these (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  41
    Mark Amorose (2001). Aristotle's Immortal Intellect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:97-106.
    Recent scholarship understands Aristotle to hold that the human intellect is in part corruptible and in part immortal. The main textual support claimed for this understanding is De Anima III.5, where Aristotle, it is said, presents his doctrine of an immortal active intellect and a mortal passive intellect. In this paper I show that Aristotle distinguishes at III.5 not an active and a passive intellect, but an agent and a potential intellect, both immortal. I further (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  63
    Martin Lenz (2008). Why is Thought Linguistic? Ockham's Two Conceptions of the Intellect. Vivarium 46 (3):302-317.
    One of Ockham's fundamental tenets about the human intellect is that its acts constitute a mental language. Although this language of thought shares some of the features of conventional language, thought is commonly considered as prior to conventional language. This paper tries to show that this consensus is seriously challenged in Ockham's early writings. I shall argue that, in claiming the priority of conventional language over mental language, Ockham established a novel explanation of the systematicity of thought—an explanation which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    Gaven Kerr (2014). Aquinas, Lonergan, and the Isomorphism Between Intellect and Reality. International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (1):43-57.
    In this article I explore Bernard Lonergan’s characteristic view that there is an isomorphism between intellect and reality such that the set of relations embedded in the cognitional process are replicated by the elements of metaphysics . My exploration is with a view to the Gilsonian objection to the critical realist project as a whole, to the effect that one cannot begin with idealism and end with realism. In this article I argue that, despite my broad sympathy for Lonergan’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  11
    Filip Karfík (2011). L'âme logos de l'intellect et le logismos de l'âme. À propos des Ennéades V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. Chôra 9:67-80.
    The paper raises the question of the relationship between the description of the soul as logos and the description of its cognitive activities as logismos in Plotinus’ Enneads V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. It first offers an interpretation of the definition of the soul as a logos of the intellect in V, 1 [10]. Then it scrutinises the use of the terms logismos and logizesthai in the same treatise and compares it to a similar use of these (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000