Search results for 'Intellect' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Active Intellect (2002). Sinful, as a Sin 40, 53 Vicious, Bad 33, 63, 87, 176 Virtuous, Good 33, 89, 176, 177,209 Active Intellect. In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer. 1--327.score: 120.0
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  2. Caleb Cohoe (2013). Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4. Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.score: 18.0
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms (...)
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  3. Herbert A. Davidson (1992). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes on Intellect: Their Cosmologies, Theories of the Active Intellect, and Theories of Human Intellect. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    A study of problems, all revolving around the subject of intellect in the philosophies of Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, this book starts by reviewing discussions in Greek and early Arabic philosophy which served as the background for the three Arabic thinkers. Davidson examines the cosmologies and theories of human and active intellect in the three philosophers and covers such subjects as: the emanation of the supernal realm from the First Cause; the emanation of the lower world from the (...)
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  4. John E. Naus (1959). The Nature of the Practical Intellect According to Saint Thomas Aquinas. Roma, Università Gregoriana.score: 18.0
    CHAPTER I SPECULATIVE AND PRACTICAL INTELLECT In the Summa Theologiae, St. Thomas devotes an entire article to answering the question, «Whether the ...
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  5. Miira Tuominen (2010). Receptive Reason: Alexander of Aphrodisias on Material Intellect. Phronesis 55 (2):170-190.score: 18.0
    According to Alexander of Aphrodisias, our potential intellect is a purely receptive capacity. Alexander also claims that, in order for us to actualise our intellectual potentiality, the intellect needs to abstract what is intelligible from enmattered perceptible objects. Now a problem emerges: How is it possible for a purely receptive capacity to perform such an abstraction? It will be argued that even though Alexander's reaction to this question causes some tension in his theory, the philosophical motivation for it (...)
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  6. Carlo Vercellone (2007). From Formal Subsumption to General Intellect: Elements for a Marxist Reading of the Thesis of Cognitive Capitalism. Historical Materialism 15 (1):13-36.score: 18.0
    Since the crisis of Fordism, capitalism has been characterised by the ever more central role of knowledge and the rise of the cognitive dimensions of labour. This is not to say that the centrality of knowledge to capitalism is new per se. Rather, the question we must ask is to what extent we can speak of a new role for knowledge and, more importantly, its relationship with transformations in the capital/labour relation. From this perspective, the paper highlights the continuing validity (...)
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  7. Joseph M. Magee (2003). Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs. Greenwood Press.score: 18.0
  8. John Dillon (2010). Intellect and the One in Porphyrys Sententiae. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):27-35.score: 18.0
    This article seeks to provide some support for the troublesome report of Damascius in the De Principiis that, for Porphyry, the first principle is the Father of the Noetic Triad—and thus more closely implicated with the realm of Intellect and Being than would seem proper for a Neoplatonist and faithful follower of Plotinus. And yet there is evidence from other sources that Porphyry did not abandon the concept of a One above Being. A clue to the complexity of the (...)
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  9. Antonio Gómez Villar (2014). Paolo Virno, lector de Marx: General Intellect, biopolítica y éxodo. Isegoría 50:305-318.score: 18.0
    Este trabajo pretende mostrar que la suspensión es la temporalidad inmanente a la noción de éxodo en Paolo Virno, a través de la potencia negativa tal como es entendida en el pensamiento de G. Agamben. La argumentación se articulará en tres momentos: en primer lugar, atenderemos a la lectura de “El Fragmento de las máquinas” de los Grundrisse de Marx que realiza Paolo Virno, en la que sostiene que la propia naturaleza del General Intellect implica que una parte importante (...)
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  10. Marleen Rozemond (1993). The Role of the Intellect in Descartes's Case for the Incorporeity of the Mind. In Stephen Voss (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy and Science of René Descartes.score: 18.0
    I argue that Descartes's best known argument for dualism relies on claims about intellectual activity and not on claims about mental states generally to establish dualism. I explain that this must be so give his historical context, where arguments for the immateriality of the mind on the basis of the intellect were common. But sensation and other non-intellectual states were regarded as pertaining to the body-soul composite.
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  11. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2012). “’Christus Secundum Spiritum’: Spinoza, Jesus, and the Infinite Intellect”. In Neta Stahl (ed.), The Jewish Jesus. Routledge.score: 15.0
  12. Charles A. Campbell (1953). Ryle on the Intellect. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (April):115-38.score: 15.0
  13. Adam Takahashi (2008). Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):451-481.score: 15.0
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  14. Paolo Virno (2007). General Intellect. Historical Materialism 15 (3):3-8.score: 15.0
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  15. Yael Raizman-Kedar (2009). The Intellect Naturalized: Roger Bacon on the Existence of Corporeal Species Within the Intellect. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):131-157.score: 15.0
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  16. André Laks (2010). Les fonctions de l'intellect. Methodos 2.score: 15.0
    Cet article est disponible en texte intégral en format PDF.
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  17. John M. McDermott (1983). Love and Understanding: The Relation of Will and Intellect in Pierre Rousselot's Christological Vision. Università Gregoriana.score: 15.0
    Abridgement of thesis (doctoral)--Gregorian University, Rome.
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  18. M. A. B. Degenhardt (1991). Art and Intellect. Studies in Philosophy and Education 11 (2):135-148.score: 15.0
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  19. Eleonore Stump (1990). Intellect, Will, and the Principle of Alternative Possibilities. In M. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press. 254-285.score: 15.0
     
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  20. Francis P. Clarke (1928). The Intellect in the Philosophy of St. Thomas. Philadelphia.score: 15.0
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  21. Clara Cooper (1935/1972). The Relation Between Morality and Intellect. Ams Press.score: 15.0
     
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  22. Edward Quinlisk Franz (1950). The Thomistic Doctrine on the Possible Intellect. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 15.0
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  23. Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) (2004). Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 Août 2002. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 15.0
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  24. John Philoponus (1991). On Aristotle on the Intellect (De Anima 3.4-8). Cornell University Press.score: 15.0
  25. Thomas (1968). On the Unity of the Intellect Against the Averroists. Milwaukee, Marquette University Press.score: 15.0
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  26. Lloyd Gerson (2004). The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima. Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.score: 12.0
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion (...)
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  27. Gyula Klima (2009). Aquinas on the Materiality of the Human Soul and the Immateriality of the Human Intellect. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):163-182.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that Aquinas's conception of the human soul and intellect offers a consistent alternative to the dilemma of materialism and post-Cartesian dualism. It also argues that in their own theoretical context, Aquinas' arguments for the materiality of the human soul and immateriality of the intellect provide a strong justification of his position. However, that theoretical context is rather "alien" to ours in contemporary philosophy. The conclusion of the paper will point in the direction of what can (...)
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  28. R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  29. Martin Lenz (2008). Why is Thought Linguistic? Ockham's Two Conceptions of the Intellect. Vivarium 46 (3):302-317.score: 12.0
    One of Ockham's fundamental tenets about the human intellect is that its acts constitute a mental language. Although this language of thought shares some of the features of conventional language, thought is commonly considered as prior to conventional language. This paper tries to show that this consensus is seriously challenged in Ockham's early writings. I shall argue that, in claiming the priority of conventional language over mental language, Ockham established a novel explanation of the systematicity of thought—an explanation which (...)
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  30. Victor Caston (1999). Aristotle's Two Intellects: A Modest Proposal. Phronesis 44 (3):199-227.score: 12.0
    In "De anima" 3.5, Aristotle argues for the existence of a second intellect, the so-called "Agent Intellect." The logical structure of his argument turns on a distinction between different types of soul, rather than different faculties within a given soul; and the attributes he assigns to the second species make it clear that his concern here -- as at the climax of his other great works, such as the "Metaphysics," the "Nicomachean" and the "Eudemian Ethics" -- is the (...)
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  31. Leen Spruit (2004). Agent Intellect and Phantasms. On the Preliminaries of Peripatetic Abstraction. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 82 (1):125-146.score: 12.0
    This paper discusses some aspects of the controversies regarding the operation of the agent intellect on sensory images. I selectively consider views developed between the 13th century and the beginning of the 17th century, focusing on positions which question the need for a (distinct) agent intellect or argue for its essential "inactivity" with respect to phantasms. My aim is to reveal limitations of the Peripatetical framework for analyzing and explaining the mechanisms involved in conceptual abstraction. The first section (...)
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  32. Nicholas Jolley (1994). Intellect and Illumination in Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):209-224.score: 12.0
    One of the hallmarks of Descartes' philosophy is the doctrine that the human mind has a faculty of pure intellect. This doctrine is so central to Descartes' teaching that it is difficult to believe that any of his disciplines would abandon it. Yet this is what happened in the case of Malebranche. This paper argues that in his later philosophy Malebranche adopted a theory of divine illumination which leaves no room for a Cartesian doctrine of pure intellect. It (...)
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  33. Mark Amorose (2001). Aristotle's Immortal Intellect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:97-106.score: 12.0
    Recent scholarship understands Aristotle to hold that the human intellect is in part corruptible and in part immortal. The main textual support claimed for this understanding is De Anima III.5, where Aristotle, it is said, presents his doctrine of an immortal active intellect and a mortal passive intellect. In this paper I show that Aristotle distinguishes at III.5 not an active and a passive intellect, but an agent and a potential intellect, both immortal. I further (...)
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  34. Jeffrey E. Foss (1996). Is There a Natural Sexual Inequality of Intellect? A Reply to Kimura. Hypatia 11 (3):24 - 46.score: 12.0
    The noted psychologist, Doreen Kimura, has argued that we should not expect to find equal numbers of men and women in various professions because there is a natural sexual inequality of intellect. In rebuttal I argue that each of these mutually supporting theses is insufficiently supported by the evidence to be accepted. The social and ethical dimensions of Kimura's work, and of the scientific study of the nature-nurture controversy in general, are briefly discussed.
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  35. Jean-Baptiste Brenet (2008). Ame Intellective, Âme Cogitative: Jean de Jandun Et la Duplex Forma Propria de L'Homme. Vivarium 46 (3):318-341.score: 12.0
    The article analyses the idea that according to the averroist Jean de Jandun, Master of Arts in Paris at the beginning of the 14th century, human beings are composed of a «double form» the separated intellect on the one hand, the cogitative soul on the other hand. After recalling several major accounts of the time, we explore Jean's reading of Averroes' major conceptions concerning the problem. Finally, we challenge the idea according to which we observe in his writings the (...)
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  36. Kurt Pritzl (2006). The Place of Intellect in Aristotle. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:57-75.score: 12.0
    This paper explores Aristotle’s account of the human intellect, with special emphasis on how this account relates to Aristotle’s treatment of nature. In his complex account of the intellect, Aristotle distinguishes very broadly between two types of intellection. One type (nous) involves the reception of what things are and is non-discursive in character, while the other type (dianoia) is the result of intellectual activity and is discursive in character. While Aristotle affirms that both types of thinking are distinctive (...)
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  37. Jean-Baptiste Brenet (2011). S'unir à l'Intellect, Voir Dieu. Averroès Et la Doctrine de la Jonction au Cœur du Thomisme. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 21 (02):215-247.score: 12.0
    The article examines the relation that Aquinas' theory of the beatific vision maintains with Averroes' noetics as presented in his Great Commentary on the De anima. Starting with his Commentary on the Sentences, in which the young Thomas Aquinas offers an explicit transposition of the philosophical intellection of separate substances into the Christian theological order, through to his later works where no mention of it is found, we will endeavour to present the exact nature of these borrowings and to evaluate (...)
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  38. M. Scott Ruse (2002). The Critique of Intellect: Henri Bergson's Prologue to an Organic Epistemology. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 35 (3):281-302.score: 12.0
    Bergson never dared to entitle his own work in such a fashion. However, his philosophical contribution on the workings of intelligence deserves such a high title. This article seeks to elucidate Bergson's contribution to philosophy in terms of his anticipation of several developments in human understanding. The work begins by investigating the relation between thought and the world (reality) by reviewing a series of constructivist concepts. In many ways, constructivism is related to both structuralism and post-structuralism, however this work does (...)
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  39. Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson (2007). Plotinus on Intellect. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Plotinus (205-269 AD) led the philosophical movement of Neoplatonism, which reinterpreted Plato's thought later in antiquity and went on to become a dominant force in the history of ideas. Emilsson's in-depth study of Plotinus' central doctrine of Intellect caters for the increasing interest in Plotinus with philosophical clarity and rigor.
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  40. Filip Karfík (forthcoming). L'âme logos de l'intellect et le logismos de l'âme. À propos des Ennéades V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. Chôra 9:67-80.score: 12.0
    The paper raises the question of the relationship between the description of the soul as logos and the description of its cognitive activities as logismos in Plotinus’ Enneads V, 1 [10] et IV, 3 [27]. It first offers an interpretation of the definition of the soul as a logos of the intellect in V, 1 [10]. Then it scrutinises the use of the terms logismos and logizesthai in the same treatise and compares it to a similar use of these (...)
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  41. Lorelle Lamascus (2006). Aquinas and Themistius on Intellect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:255-273.score: 12.0
    Aquinas puts forward two different, and conflicting, interpretations of Themistius’s account of the intellect. In his earlier interpretation of Themistius, Aquinas understands him to hold the position that both the possible and agent intellect are separate and incorruptible, existing apart from individual human souls but shared in by individual souls in the process of knowing. In De unitate intellectus contra averroistas, however, Aquinas radically departs from this reading, hailing Themistius as a genuine interpreter of the Peripatetic position, while (...)
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  42. Gabriel Chindea (2011). La Théorie Thomiste de l'Intellect Agent Et Ses Équivoques Dans Summa Theologica, Quaestiones Disputatae de Anima Et De Unitate Intellectus. Chôra 7:299-314.score: 12.0
    The objective of this article is to analyze some of the ambiguities of the Thomistic theory related to the agent intellect. Precisely, it is about those contradictionsor confusions that appeared as a consequence of Saint Thomas necessity to prove the existence and continuity of intellectual human activity after the death. These ideas are mainly found in Quaestiones disputatae de anima, where they generate two doctrines relatively opposed with regards to agent intellect, but they do not completely vanish in (...)
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  43. Caery Evangelist (2011). Aquinas on Being and Essence As Proper Objects of the Intellect. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):361-390.score: 12.0
    This article investigates a tension among Aquinas’s basic claims about what constitutes the proper object of the human intellect. Aquinas asserts that the mindhas only one proper object, yet he repeatedly endorses two different candidates for this role: the being of a thing (ens) and a thing’s essence (essentia). One might assume the tension disappears if ens signifies the essence of a thing. Alternatively, the tension seems to dissolve if each operation of the intellect (apprehension and judgment) takes (...)
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  44. Siobhan Nash-Marshall (2002). The Intellect, Receptivity, and Material Singulars in Aquinas. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):371-388.score: 12.0
    Intellectual receptivity is both the prerequisite for objective human knowledge and the condition of possibility for all human knowledge. My arguments are cast in Thomistic terms. In the first part, I review the most important arguments with which Aquinas defends the receptivity of the human intellect, especially the argument from intellectual media and the argument from actualization. In the second part, I attempt to resolve the apparent contradictions involved in the claim that the intellect is receptive, contradictions that (...)
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  45. David Peroutka Ocd (2010). Imagination, Intellect and Premotion A Psychological Theory of Domingo Báñez. Studia Neoaristotelica 7 (2):107-115.score: 12.0
    The notion of physical premotion (praemotio physica) is usually associated with the theological topic of divine concurrence (concursus divinus). In the present paper I argue that the Thomist Domingo Báñez (1528–1604) applied the concept of premotion (though not the expression “praemotio”) also in his psychology. According to Báñez, the active intellect (intellectus agens) communicates a kind of “actual motion” to the phantasma (i.e. the mental sensory image perceived by the imagination) in order to render it a collaborator of intellectual (...)
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  46. Marilena Vlad (2007). De l'unité de l'intellect à l'un absolu. Chôra 5:121-139.score: 12.0
    In this article, I discuss Plotinus. critique of the peripatetic idea of the divine intellect as first principle. As I am trying to show, Plotinus accepts the unity of the intellect as self-thinking, and, even more than Aristotle, he emphasizes this unity. Yet, he insists on the necessity of a principle that is even higher and simpler than the intellect. Eventually, intellect proves to be the unity of a plurality, though it is the most unitary being. (...)
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  47. Eric D. Perl (2009). The Good of the Intellect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:25-39.score: 12.0
    Recent continental philosophy often seeks to retrieve Neoplatonic transcendence, or the Good, while ignoring the place of intellect in classical and medieval Neoplatonism. Instead, it attempts to articulate an encounter with radical transcendence in the immediacy of temporality, individuality, and affectivity.On the assumption that there is no intellectual intuition (Kant), intellectual consciousness is reduced to ratiocination and is taken to be “poor in intuition” (Marion). In this context, the present paper expounds Plotinus’ phenomenology of intellectual experience to show how (...)
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  48. Frank Lucash (1993). The Philosophical Method of the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect and its Application to the Ethics. Philosophy and Theology 7 (3):311-322.score: 12.0
    I argue that we can arrive at a better understanding of the Ethics and why Spinoza wrote it by viewing it through certain ideas expressed in his Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. These ideas are: 1) personal remarks, 2) the method and most perfect method, 3) true ideas, 4) false ideas, 5) definitions.
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  49. Kenneth R. Westphal (2000). ‘Kant, Hegel, and the Fate of “the” Intuitive Intellect’. In S. Sedgwick (ed.), The Reception of Kant’s Critical Philosophy: Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Cambridge.score: 12.0
    The young Hegel was entranced by the notion of intellectual intuition, and this notion continues to entrance many of Hegel’ commentators. I argue that Kant provided three distinct conceptions of an intuitive intellect, that none of these involve aconceptual intuitionism, and that they differ markedly from Fichte’s and Schelling’s conceptions of intellectual intuition. I further argue that by 1804 Hegel recognized that appealing to an aconceptual model, or to Schelling’s model, or to his own early model of intellectual intuition (...)
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  50. Édouard H. Wéber (1998). L'identité de l'intellect et de l'intelligible selon la version latine d'Averroés et son interprétation par Thomas d'Aquin. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 8 (02):233-.score: 10.0
    Le thlicien d'identittique d'Averrotudie par les penseurs latins du XIIIe siveloppe avec exigence en vue de sauvegarder le caractritcessaire qu'identifie la pens personnelle de l'optre latin du XIIIe si le discernement d'Averrotique et l'a confirmre rigoureusement personnel de 1'intellection humaine.
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