Search results for 'Intellect History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William H. Calvin (2004). A Brief History of the Mind: From Apes to Intellect and Beyond. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    This book looks back at the simpler versions of mental life in apes, Neanderthals, and our ancestors, back before our burst of creativity started 50,000 years...
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  2. G. J. P. O'daly (1994). Plotinus John Bussanich: The One and its Relation to Intellect in Plotinus: A Commentary on Selected Texts. (Philosophia Antiqua, 49.) Pp. Vii+258. Leiden, New York, Copenhagen, Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1988. Paper, Gld. 90. Gary M. Gurtler: Plotinus: The Experience of Unity. (American University Studies, Series V, 43.) Pp. Xiii+320. New York, Bern, Frankfurt Am Main, Paris: Peter Lang, 1988. Cased, $43.40. Frederic M. Schroeder: Form and Transformation: A Study in the Philosophy of Plotinus. (McGill–Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas, 16.) Pp. Xiv+125. Montreal, Kingston, London, Buffalo: McGill–Queen's University Press, 1992. Cased, £25.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (02):311-314.score: 120.0
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  3. John J. Stuhr (1987). Michel Foucault and the Subversion of the Intellect_, And: _Michel Foucault: The Freedom of Philosophy_, And: _Foucault, Marxism and History: Mode of Production Versus Mode of Information (Review). Philosophy and Literature 11 (1):148-162.score: 120.0
  4. David De Leonardis (2005). Thomas M. Izbicki and Christopher M. Bellitto, Eds., Nicholas of Cusa and His Age: Intellect and Spirituality. Essays Dedicated to the Memory of F. Edward Cranz, Thomas P. McTighe and Charles Trinkaus. (Studies in the History of Christian Thought, 105.) Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2002. Pp. Xiv, 282. $85. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (2):594-596.score: 120.0
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  5. David A. Dilworth (2010). Elective Metaphysical Affinities: Emerson's The Natural History of Intellect and Peirce's Synechism'. Cognitio 11 (1).score: 120.0
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  6. Joseph M. Magee (2003). Unmixing the Intellect: Aristotle on the Cognitive Powers and Bodily Organs. Greenwood Press.score: 96.0
  7. John M. McDermott (1983). Love and Understanding: The Relation of Will and Intellect in Pierre Rousselot's Christological Vision. Università Gregoriana.score: 90.0
    Abridgement of thesis (doctoral)--Gregorian University, Rome.
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  8. M. A. B. Degenhardt (1991). Art and Intellect. Studies in Philosophy and Education 11 (2):135-148.score: 90.0
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  9. Maria Cândida da Costa Reis Monteiro Pacheco & José Francisco Meirinhos (eds.) (2004). Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, S.I.E.P.M., Porto, du 26 au 31 Août 2002. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 90.0
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  10. Christopher Gill (ed.) (1990). The Person and the Human Mind: Issues in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This collection of essays explores analogous issues in classical and modern philosophy that relate to the concepts of person and human being. A primary focus is whether there are such analogous issues, and whether we can find in ancient philosophy a notion that is comparable to "person" as understood in modern philosophy. Essays on modern philosophy reappraise the validity of the notion of person, while essays on classical philosophy take up the related questions of what being "human" entails in ancient (...)
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  11. Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.score: 60.0
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  12. C. F. Goodey (2001). From Natural Disability to the Moral Man: Calvinism and the History of Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 14 (3):1-29.score: 60.0
    Some humanist theologians within the French Reformed Church in the 17th century developed the notion that a disability of the intellect could exist in nature independently of any moral defect, freeing its possessors from any obligations of natural law. Sharpened by disputes with the church leadership, this notion began to suggest a species-type classification that threatened to override the importance of the boundary between elect and reprobate in the doctrine of predestination. This classification seems to look forward to the (...)
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  13. Hyŏng-ik Chʻoe (ed.) (2007). Kojŏn Tasi Ilki. Meidei.score: 60.0
    1. Singminjijŏk sayu ŭi chŏnbok ŭl wihae.
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  14. Sellés Dauder & Juan Fernando (2008). Los Hábitos Intelectuales Según Tomás de Aquino. Eunsa.score: 60.0
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  15. Konstantinos Rantis (2004). Geist Und Natur: Von den Vorsokratikern Zur Kritischen Theorie. Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft.score: 60.0
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  16. Daniel J. Nicholson (2011). Review of 'Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life' (Riskin, 2007). [REVIEW] Annals of Science 68 (1):136-139.score: 54.0
    Since antiquity, philosophers and engineers have tried to take life’s measure by reproducing it. Aiming to reenact Creation, at least in part, these experimenters have hoped to understand the links between body and spirit, matter and mind, mechanism and consciousness. Genesis Redux examines moments from this centuries-long experimental tradition: efforts to simulate life in machinery, to synthesize life out of material parts, and to understand living beings by comparison with inanimate mechanisms.Jessica Riskin collects seventeen essays from distinguished scholars in several (...)
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  17. Jessica Riskin (ed.) (2007). Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. University of Chicago Press.score: 54.0
    Since antiquity, philosophers and engineers have tried to take life’s measure by reproducing it. Aiming to reenact Creation, at least in part, these experimenters have hoped to understand the links between body and spirit, matter and mind, mechanism and consciousness. Genesis Redux examines moments from this centuries-long experimental tradition: efforts to simulate life in machinery, to synthesize life out of material parts, and to understand living beings by comparison with inanimate mechanisms. Jessica Riskin collects seventeen essays from distinguished scholars in (...)
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  18. Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson (2007). Plotinus on Intellect. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Plotinus (205-269 AD) led the philosophical movement of Neoplatonism, which reinterpreted Plato's thought later in antiquity and went on to become a dominant force in the history of ideas. Emilsson's in-depth study of Plotinus' central doctrine of Intellect caters for the increasing interest in Plotinus with philosophical clarity and rigor.
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  19. Robert F. Brown (ed.) (2006). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume II: Greek Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered transcripts (...)
     
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  20. Robert F. Brown (ed.) (2009). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy 1825-6: Volume I: Introduction and Oriental Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series -/- Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered (...)
     
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  21. Robert F. Brown (ed.) (2009). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy: Volume III: Medieval and Modern Philosophy, Revised Edition. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    The Hegel Lectures Series -/- Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered (...)
     
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  22. Owen Goldin & Patricia Kilroe (eds.) (1997). Human Life and the Natural World: Readings in the History of Western Philosophy. Broadview Press.score: 54.0
    Human concern over the urgency of current environmental issues increasingly entails wide-ranging discussions of how we may rethink the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. In order to provide a context for such discussions this anthology provides a selection of some of the most important, interesting and influential readings on the subject from classical times through to the late nineteenth century. Included are such figures as Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Hildegard of Bingen, St Francis of Assisi, Bacon, (...)
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  23. James T. H. Martin (1997). Active Mind in Aristotle's Psychology. P. Lang.score: 48.0
     
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  24. Nicholas Jolley (1994). Intellect and Illumination in Malebranche. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):209-224.score: 42.0
    One of the hallmarks of Descartes' philosophy is the doctrine that the human mind has a faculty of pure intellect. This doctrine is so central to Descartes' teaching that it is difficult to believe that any of his disciplines would abandon it. Yet this is what happened in the case of Malebranche. This paper argues that in his later philosophy Malebranche adopted a theory of divine illumination which leaves no room for a Cartesian doctrine of pure intellect. It (...)
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  25. Mor Segev (2014). 'Obviously All This Agrees with My Will and My Intellect': Schopenhauer on Active and Passive Nous in Aristotle's De Anima Iii.5. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):535-556.score: 42.0
    In one of the unpublished parts of his manuscript titled the Spicilegia, Arthur Schopenhauer presents an uncharacteristically sympathetic reading of an Aristotelian text. The text in question, De anima III. 5, happens to include the only occurrence of arguably the most controversial idea in Aristotle, namely the distinction between active and passive nous. Schopenhauer interprets these two notions as corresponding to his own notions of the ?will? and the ?intellect? or ?subject of knowledge?, respectively. The result is a unique (...)
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  26. Anne Showstack Sassoon (2000). Gramsci and Contemporary Politics: Beyond Pessimism of the Intellect. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Gramsci and Contemporary Politics is a collection of Anne Showstack Sassoon's writing which spans the major transitions from Thatcher and Reagan to Clinton and ...
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  27. Roxanne D. Marcotte (2004). La conversion tardive d'un philosophe: Abu al-Barakat al-Baghdidi (mort vers 545/1150) sur "L'Intellect et sa quiddite" (al-'Aql wa mahiyyatu-hu). [REVIEW] Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 15 (1):201-226.score: 42.0
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  28. George Elder Davie (1986/1987). The Crisis of the Democratic Intellect: The Problem of Generalism and Specialisation in Twentieth-Century Scotland. Barnes & Noble Books.score: 42.0
     
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  29. John Dillon (1973). The Concept of Two Intellects: A Footnote to the History of Platonism. Phronesis 18 (2):176 - 185.score: 40.0
  30. David Rapport Lachterman (1992). Mathematical Construction, Symbolic Cognition and the Infinite Intellect: Reflections on Maimon and Maimonides. Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):497-522.score: 36.0
  31. Rosalind Ward Gwynne (2004). Logic, Rhetoric, and Legal Reasoning in the Qurʼān: God's Arguments. Routledgecurzon.score: 36.0
    Muslims have always used verses from the Qur'an to support opinions on law, theology, or life in general, but almost no attention has been paid to how the Qur'an presents its own precepts as conclusions proceeding from reasoned arguments. Whether it is a question of God's powers of creation, the rationale for his acts, or how people are to think clearly about their lives and fates, Muslims have so internalized Qur'anic patterns of reasoning that many will assert that the Qur'an (...)
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  32. John Cottingham (1988). The Intellect, the Will, and the Passions: Spinoza's Critique of Descartes. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (2):239-257.score: 36.0
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  33. Carl N. Still (2009). The Divine Sense: The Intellect in Patristic Theology (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 135-136.score: 36.0
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  34. Sebastian Gertz (2009). Plotinus on Intellect (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 621-622.score: 36.0
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  35. Ernst van Alphen (2005). Art in Mind: How Contemporary Images Shape Thought. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    Art has the power to affect our thinking, changing not only the way we view and interact with the world but also how we create it. In Art in Mind , Ernst van Alphen probes this idea of art as a commanding force with the capacity to shape our intellect and intervene in our lives. Rather than interpreting art as merely a reflection of our social experience or a product of history, van Alphen here argues that art is (...)
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  36. Isaiah Berlin (1990/2003). The Crooked Timber of Humanity: Chapters in the History of Ideas. Pimlico.score: 36.0
    "Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made."--Immanuel Kant Isaiah Berlin was one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century--an activist of the intellect who marshaled vast erudition and eloquence in defense of the endangered values of individual liberty and moral and political pluralism. In the Crooked Timber of Humanity he exposes the links between the ideas of the past and the social and political cataclysms of our present century: between the Platonic (...)
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  37. Carl Page (1996). Symbolic Mathematics and the Intellect Militant: On Modern Philosophy's Revolutionary Spirit. Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (2):233-253.score: 36.0
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  38. Juan Fernando Sellés (2012). El intelecto agente como acto de ser personal. Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 45:35-63.score: 36.0
    In this work we study the suggestive position of some authors who constitute an exception in the history of the philosophy in respect to the interpretation of the agent intellect, the great Aristotle´s discovery: Francisco Canals, Leonardo Polo and his disciples, because these authors put the agent intellect at the level of “ actus essendi hominis ”.
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  39. David R. Blumenthal (1977). On the Intellect and the Rational Soul. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):207-211.score: 36.0
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  40. Terence Kleven (1995). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes on Intellect: Their Cosmologies, Theories of the Active Intellect, and Theories of Human Intellect (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (1):168-170.score: 36.0
  41. Riccardo Pozzo (2006). The Impact of Aristotelianism on Modern Philosophy (Studies in Philosophy and the History of Philosophy, Vol 39). Review of Metaphysics 3 (235):563.score: 36.0
    In this volume, thirteen distinguished scholars consider the impact of Aristotelianism on modern philosophy. Spanning the last five centuries, the articles examine Aristotelian issues present in the writings of late scholastic, Renaissance, and early modern philosophers, such as: Vernia, Barbaro, Cajetan, Nifo, Piccolomini, Zabarella, Galileo, Campanella, Semery, Leibniz, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, and Gadamer. The contributors pay particular attention to the role of the five intellectual virtues set forth by Aristotle in book VI of the Nicomachean Ethics-art, (...)
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  42. Henry Walter Brann (1972). Aristotle's Concept of Intellect (Νοῦσ) in the Context of His Main Philosophical Writings. Philosophy and History 5 (2):157-160.score: 36.0
  43. Cushing Strout (2005). William James:“Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will”. Modern Intellectual History 2 (2):277-287.score: 36.0
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  44. D. M. Hutchinson (2013). Aristotle and Plotinus on the Intellect. Monism and Dualism Revisited by Mark D. Nyvlt (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):480-481.score: 36.0
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  45. John Inglis (1995). Aquinas Against the Averroists: On There Being Only One Intellect (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (3):516-517.score: 36.0
  46. Michael Lynch (2000). A New Disease of the Intellect? Some Reflections on the Therapeutic Value of Peter Winch's Philosophy for Social and Cultural Studies of Science. History of the Human Sciences 13 (1):140-156.score: 36.0
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  47. Steindór J. Erlingsson (2009). The Costs of Being a Restless Intellect: Julian Huxley's Popular and Scientific Career in the 1920s. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (2):101-108.score: 36.0
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  48. Blair Campbell (1980). Intellect and the Political Order in Plato'republic'. History of Political Thought 1 (3):361-389.score: 36.0
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  49. Alan Carling (1993). 'Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will' a Reconstructed Marxist Theory for the 1990s? History of the Human Sciences 6 (2):115-120.score: 36.0
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