Search results for 'Intellectual freedom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jane Fowler Morse (2001). Intellectual Freedom and Economic Sufficiency as Educational Entitlements. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):201-211.score: 234.0
    This paper explores the historic philosophical contributions ofMill and Marx toward a comprehensive conception of intellectual freedomas a basic educational entitlement. In a perhaps surprising confluence,Marx's theory of a material base for freedom of thought is then extendedin a discussion of contemporary freedoms including, importantly,academic freedom and its implication for teaching, the profession andits training.
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  2. Autonomy-Based Freedom (2007). Joseph Raz, From The Morality of Freedom (1986). In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 413.score: 210.0
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  3. Anton Charles Pegis (1960). Christian Philosophy and Intellectual Freedom. Milwaukee, Bruce Pub. Co..score: 210.0
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  4. Ability Freedom (2007). Part VII Freedom, Ability, and Economic Inequality. In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 350.score: 210.0
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  5. Nicola Abbagnano (1951). Intellectual Freedom. Journal of Philosophy 48 (11):356-361.score: 150.0
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  6. David J. Pittenger (2003). Intellectual Freedom and Editorial Responsibilities Within the Context of Controversial Research. Ethics and Behavior 13 (2):105 – 125.score: 150.0
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  7. Nigel Blake (1988). Intellectual Freedom and the Universities: A Reply to Anthony O'Hear. Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):251–263.score: 150.0
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  8. George E. Axtelle, H. Gordon Hullfish, Kent Pillsbury, B. Othanel Smith & A. Stafford Clayton (1953). The Right to Intellectual Freedom. Educational Theory 3 (2):185-186.score: 150.0
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  9. J. . Clayton Murray (1954). A Selected Bibliography on Intellectual Freedom. Modern Schoolman 31 (2):117-124.score: 150.0
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  10. Diana Woodward (1991). Intellectual Freedom Versus Privacy Protection. Social Philosophy Today 5:433-444.score: 150.0
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  11. Julie E. Cohen (2001). Information Rights and Intellectual Freedom. In Anton Vedder (ed.), Ethics and the Internet. Intersentia. 11--32.score: 150.0
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  12. J. Clayton Murray (1954). Addenda to "A Selected Bibliography on Intellectual Freedom". Modern Schoolman 31 (3):223-223.score: 150.0
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  13. Alan Rubel (2014). Privacy and Positive Intellectual Freedom. Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (3):390-407.score: 150.0
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  14. John Buschman & Mark Rosenzweig (1999). Intellectual Freedom Within the Library Workplace: An Exploratory Study in the US. Journal of Information Ethics 8 (2):36-45.score: 150.0
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  15. Martha Cornog (1992). Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award ALA's Intellectual Freedom Round Table. Journal of Information Ethics 1.score: 150.0
     
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  16. M. Larochelle & J. Désautels (2007). Concerning Ernst von Glasersfeld's Contribution to Intellectual Freedom: One Interpretation, One Example. Constructivist Foundations 2 (2-3):90-97.score: 150.0
    Purpose: According to the constructivist perspective tirelessly promoted by Ernst von Glasersfeld for more than 40 years now, the world we see is of a piece with our way of understanding and locating ourselves within it; ultimately, whenever we claim to describe the world-in-itself, we in fact are describing the product of the mapping process that has enabled us to make our way in this world and to actualize our projects within it. Obviously, this kind of perspective has consequences for (...)
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  17. John Christian Laursen (1989). Scepticism and Intellectual Freedom-the Philosophical Foundations of Kant Politics of Publicity. History of Political Thought 10 (3):439-455.score: 150.0
     
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  18. G. Reid (1996). Intellectual Freedom-Being at Home with Dissonance. Journal of Thought 31:57-62.score: 150.0
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  19. A. Sanmarchi (2001). Style as an Indication of Intellectual Freedom: Philosophizing According to Cornelio Fabbro. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 93 (1):95-128.score: 150.0
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  20. Alan Scott (1995). Value Freedom and Intellectual Autonomy. History of the Human Sciences 8 (3):69-88.score: 120.0
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  21. Raymond Dennehy (1980). The Intellectual Disarming of Freedom. New Scholasticism 54 (3):326-341.score: 120.0
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  22. David B. Downing (2006). Academic Freedom as Intellectual Property: When Collegiality Confronts the Standardization Movement. Symploke 13 (1):56-79.score: 120.0
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  23. G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). The Appearance and Disappearance of Intellectual Intuition in Schelling’s Philosophy. Analecta Hermeneutica.score: 102.0
    In the first section of this paper, I account for the nexus of the problems of grounding, freedom and meaning. These problems demand, respectively, a principle by which cognition forms a system rather than an aggregate, a principle by which a system of cognition is compatible with freedom rather than incompatible and a principle by which a system of freedom can show why there is meaning rather than none. In the second section, I reconstruct Schelling’s argument in (...)
     
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  24. Rena Selya (2012). Defending Scientific Freedom and Democracy: The Genetics Society of America's Response to Lysenko. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):415 - 442.score: 96.0
    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the leaders of the Genetics Society of America (GSA) struggled to find an appropriate group response to Trofim Lysenko's scientific claims and the Soviet treatment of geneticists. Although some of the leaders of the GSA favored a swift, critical response, procedural and ideological obstacles prevented them from following this path. Concerned about establishing scientific orthodoxy on one hand and politicizing the content of their science on the other, these American geneticists drew on democratic (...)
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  25. Cary Nelson (2010). No University is an Island: Saving Academic Freedom. New York University Press.score: 90.0
    Peppered throughout with previously unreported, and sometimes incendiary, higher education anecdotes, Nelson is at his flame-throwing best.The book calls on ...
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  26. Robert F. Garnett (2009). Liberal Learning as Freedom: A Capabilities Approach to Undergraduate Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):437-447.score: 78.0
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  27. Palmyre M. F. Oomen (2003). On Brain, Soul, Self, and Freedom: An Essay in Bridging Neuroscience and Faith. Zygon 38 (2):377-392.score: 66.0
    The article begins at the intellectual fissure between many statements coming from neuroscience and the language of faith and theology. First I show that some conclusions drawn from neuroscientific research are not as firm as they seem: neuroscientific data leave room for the interpretation that mind matters. I then take a philosophical-theological look at the notions of soul, self, and freedom, also in the light of modern scientific research (self-organization, neuronal networks), and present a view in which these (...)
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  28. Enrique Bonete (2013). Neuroethics in Spain: Neurological Determinism or Moral Freedom? Neuroethics 6 (1):225-232.score: 66.0
    Spanish culture has recently shown interest about Neuroethics, a new line of research and reflection. It can be said that two general, and somewhat opposing, perspectives are currently being developed in Spain about neuroethics-related topics. One originates from the neuroscientific field and the other from the philosophical field. We will see, throughout this article, that the Spanish authors, who I am going to select here, deal with very diverse neuroethical topics and that they analyse them from different intellectual assumptions. (...)
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  29. András Szigeti (2005). Freedom: A Global Theory? Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (13):157-176.score: 66.0
    This essay provides a critical discussion of Philip Pettit’s book A Theory of Freedom: From the Psychology to the Politics of Agency (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001). It evaluates the general prospeets of a ‘global theory of freedom’ of the kind advocated by Pettit, i.e. one that seeks explicitly to link a metaphysical theory of free agency to a distinct conception of political liberty. Pettit’s in many ways innovative views concerning ongoing debates in metaphysics and political theory (e.g. (...)
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  30. Aret Karademir (2013). Heidegger and Foucault: On the Relation Between the Anxiety–Engendering–Truth and Being-Towards-Freedom. [REVIEW] Human Studies 36 (3):375-392.score: 66.0
    In his very last, now famous, interview, Michel Foucault states that his philosophical thought was shaped by his reading of Heidegger, even though he does not specify what aspects of Heidegger’s philosophy inspired him in the first place. However, his last interview is not the only place where Foucault refers to Heidegger as his intellectual guide. In his 1981/1982 lecture course, The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Foucault confesses that the way Heidegger conceptualized the relationship between subject and truth was (...)
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  31. Axel Gosseries (ed.) (2008). Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan.score: 66.0
    In this volume, fourteen philosophers, economists and legal scholars and one computer scientist address various facets of the same question: under which conditions (if any) can intellectual property rights be fair? This general question unfolds in a variety of others: What are the parallels and differences between intellectual and real property? Are libertarian theories especially sympathetic to IP rights? Should Rawlsian support copyright? How can a concern for incentives be taken into account by each of the main theories (...)
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  32. Steve Fuller (2009). The Sociology of Intellectual Life: The Career of the Mind in and Around the Academy. Sage.score: 66.0
    1. The Place of Intellectual Life: The University -- The University as an Institutional Solution to the Problem of Knowledge -- The Alienability of Knowledge in Our So-called Knowledge Society -- The Knowledge Society as Capitalism of the Third Order -- Will the University Survive the Era of Knowledge Management? -- Postmodernism as an Anti-university Movement -- Regaining the University's Critical Edge by Historicizing the Curriculum -- Affirmative Action as a Strategy for Redressing the Balance Between Research and Teaching (...)
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  33. Cristian Timmermann & Henk van den Belt (2013). Intellectual Property and Global Health: From Corporate Social Responsibility to the Access to Knowledge Movement. Liverpool Law Review 34 (1):47-73.score: 66.0
    Any system for the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) has three main kinds of distributive effects. It will determine or influence: (a) the types of objects that will be developed and for which IPRs will be sought; (b) the differential access various people will have to these objects; and (c) the distribution of the IPRs themselves among various actors. What this means to the area of pharmaceutical research is that many urgently needed medicines will not be developed at (...)
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  34. Timothy Pawl (2014). The Freedom of Christ and the Problem of Deliberation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):233-247.score: 66.0
    Call the claim, common to many in the Christian intellectual tradition, that Christ, in virtue of his created human intellect, had certain, infallible exhaustive foreknowledge the Foreknowledge Thesis. Now consider what I will call the Conditional: If the Foreknowledge Thesis is true, then Christ’s created human will lacked an important sort of freedom that we mere humans have. Insofar as many, perhaps all, of the people who affirm the Foreknowledge Thesis also wish to affirm the robust freedom (...)
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  35. Timothy Pawl (2013). The Freedom of Christ and Explanatory Priority. Religious Studies:1-17.score: 66.0
    Call the claim, common to many in the Christian intellectual tradition, that Christ, in virtue of his created human intellect, had certain, infallible, exhaustive foreknowledge the Foreknowledge Thesis. Now consider what I will call the Conditional: if the Foreknowledge Thesis is true, then Christ's created human will was not free. In so far as many, perhaps all, of the people who affirm the Foreknowledge Thesis also wish to affirm the freedom of Christ's human will, the truth of the (...)
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  36. Annabelle Lever (2012). New Frontiers in the Philosophy of Intellectual Property. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    The new frontiers in the philosophy of intellectual property lie squarely in territories belonging to moral and political philosophy, as well as legal philosophy and philosophy of economics – or so this collection suggests. Those who wish to understand the nature and justification of intellectual property may now find themselves immersed in philosophical debates on the structure and relative merits of consequentialist and deontological moral theories, or disputes about the nature and value of privacy, or the relationship between (...)
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  37. Li Bennich-Björkman (2006). Intellectual Conformism Depends on Institutional Incentives, Not on Socialized Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):569-570.score: 60.0
    The study by Ceci et al. shows that academic behavior associated with the core principles of intellectual freedom is more shaped by institutional incentives than by organizational culture. From an organizational theoretical point of view, this is quite an unexpected finding, not least because we do believe universities to be fairly strong and explicit cultures that should be successful in socialization. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  38. Kiyoshi Murata & Yohko Orito (2010). Japanese Risk Society: Trying to Create Complete Security and Safety Using Information and Communication Technology. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):38-49.score: 60.0
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  39. Vsevolod Rechyt͡sʹkyǐ (2007). Simvolicheskai͡a Realnostʹ I Pravo. Vntl-Klassika.score: 60.0
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  40. Wayne F. Allen (1982). Hannah Arendt: Existential Phenomenology and Political Freedom. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):170-190.score: 54.0
    This paper has three purposes: first, to explicate the ex istential basis of Arendt's theory of action. This will be done by first tracing the intellectual derivation of Arendt's existentialism and the modifications she made to fit it in to her public realm. Second, I will demonstrate the con nection between Arendt's existentialism and her formula tion of political freedom. Third, I will illustrate throughout that Arendt's political ideas, if they are to be properly understood, must be subsumed (...)
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  41. Susanne Bobzien (1998). Determinism and Freedom in Stoic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Bobzien presents the definitive study of one of the most interesting intellectual legacies of the ancient Greeks: the Stoic theory of causal determinism. She explains what it was, how the Stoics justified it, and how it relates to their views on possibility, action, freedom, moral responsibility, moral character, fatalism, logical determinism and many other topics. She demonstrates the considerable philosophical richness and power that these ideas retain today.
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  42. Anne Barron (2012). Kant, Copyright and Communicative Freedom. Law and Philosophy 31 (1):1-48.score: 54.0
    The rapid recent expansion of copyright law worldwide has sparked efforts to defend the ‘public domain’ of non-propertized information, often on the ground that an expansive public domain is a condition of a ‘free culture’. Yet questions remain about why the public domain is worth defending, what exactly a free culture is, and what role (if any) authors’ rights might play in relation to it. From the standard liberal perspective shared by many critics of copyright expansionism, the protection of individual (...)
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  43. Jacqueline Mariña (1999). Schleiermacher on the Philosopher’s Stone: The Shaping of Schleiermacher’s Early Ethics by the Kantian Legacy. Journal of Religion 79 (2):193-215.score: 54.0
    This article explores the early Schleiermacher's attempts to deal with difficult philosophical problems arising from Kant's ethics, specifically Kant's notion of transcendental freedom. How do we connect a transcendentally free act with the nature of the subject? Insofar as the act is transcendentally free, it cannot be understood in terms of causes, and this means that it cannot be connected with the previous state of the individual before he or she engaged in the act. I work through Schleiermacher's grappling (...)
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  44. Frank van Dun, The Perfect Law of Freedom.score: 54.0
    ‘The one who peers into the perfect law of freedom and perseveres, and is not a hearer who forgets but a doer who acts, such a one shall be blessed in what he does’ (James 1:25). Freedom, in one sense of the word or another, is a central theme of the bible, the Old Testament as well as the New. During the Middle Ages, Christian theologians developed this theme into a doctrine of the natural right of freedom (...)
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  45. Shaheen E. Lakhan & Meenakshi K. Khurana (2008). Intellectual Property, Copyright, and Fair Use in Education. Cogprints.score: 54.0
    As with other rights, such as liberty and organization, intellectual property (IP) rights are often overlooked or disregarded simply because they are intangible. Yet, IP rights are essential to the workings of our society, and upholding them means greater freedom to invent, create, and advance.
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  46. Tang Yun (2014). Freedom, Legalism and Subject Formation The Question of Internalization. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (2):171-190.score: 54.0
    With self-determination as its implication, freedom can create room for such psychological mechanism as internalization to perform the function of transforming the external social regulation into self-regulation. For this transformation to be viable, however, subject needs to be formed and subsequently social regulation becomes redundant, thanks to the formation of subject. Freedom as a necessary condition for the subject formation and this transfiguration of social regulation is often neglected in favor of social order. Drawing on various intellectual (...)
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  47. Isaiah Berlin (2002). Freedom and its Betrayal: Six Enemies of Human Liberty. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    Isaiah Berlin's celebrated radio lectures on six formative anti-liberal thinkers were broadcast by the BBC in 1952. They are published here for the first time, fifty years later. They comprise one of Berlin's earliest and most convincing expositions of his views on human freedom and on the history of ideas--views that later found expression in such famous works as "Two Concepts of Liberty," and were at the heart of his lifelong work on the Enlightenment and its critics. Working with (...)
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