Search results for 'International criminal law Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.) (2012). Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.score: 1413.0
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  2. Matthew Lister (2010). Review of May & Hoskins, International Criminal Law and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Concurring Opinions Blog.score: 1356.0
    This is a review of an anthology on international criminal law edited by Larry May and Zack Hoskins.
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  3. Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) (2010). International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 1302.0
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy is the first anthology to bring together legal and philosophical theorists to examine the normative and conceptual foundations of international criminal law. In particular, through these essays the international group of authors addresses questions of state sovereignty; of groups, rather than individuals, as perpetrators and victims of international crimes; of international criminal law and the promotion of human rights and social justice; and of what comes after (...)
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  4. George P. Fletcher (2007). The Grammar of Criminal Law: American, Comparative, and International. Oxford University Press.score: 1086.0
    The Grammar of Criminal Law is a 3-volume work that addresses the field of international and comparative criminal law, with its primary focus on the issues of international concern, ranging from genocide, to domestic efforts to combat terrorism, to torture, and to other international crimes. The first volume is devoted to foundational issues. The Grammar of Criminal Law is unique in its systematic emphasis on the relationship between language and legal theory; there is no (...)
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  5. Leslie P. Francis & John G. Francis (2010). Stateless Crimes, Legitimacy, and International Criminal Law: The Case of Organ Trafficking. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):283-295.score: 1050.0
    Organ trafficking and trafficking in persons for the purpose of organ transplantation are recognized as significant international problems. Yet these forms of trafficking are largely left out of international criminal law regimes and to some extent of domestic criminal law regimes as well. Trafficking of organs or persons for their organs does not come within the jurisdiction of the ICC, except in very special cases such as when conducted in a manner that conforms to the definitions (...)
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  6. Kai Ambos (2013). The Overall Function of International Criminal Law: Striking the Right Balance Between the Rechtsgut and the Harm Principles. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-29.score: 1050.0
    Current International Criminal Law (‘ICL’) suffers from at least four theoretical shortcomings regarding its ‘concept and meaning’, ‘ius puniendi’ (supranational right to punish), ‘overall function’ and ‘purposes of punishment’ (For clarification of these basic questions, see Ambos in Oxf J Legal Stud 33:293–315, 2013b. Of course, there are many possible conceptualisations of the basic questions facing any theory of criminal law see, for example, Murphy in Columbia Law Rev 87:509–532, 1987. Yet, taking the perspective of ICL, I (...)
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  7. Shlomit Wallerstein (forthcoming). Delegation of Powers and Authority in International Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.score: 1047.0
    By what right, or under whose authority, do you try me? This is a common challenge raised by defendants standing trial in front of international criminal courts or tribunals. The challenge comes from the fact that traditionally criminal law is justified as a response of the state to wrongdoing that has been identified by the state as a crime. Nevertheless, since the early 1990s we have seen the development of international criminal tribunals that have the (...)
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  8. Pablo Kalmanovitz (2011). International Criminal Law and Philosophy, Larry May and Zachary Hoskins, Eds. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010), 268 Pp., $88 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 25 (1):87-89.score: 1017.0
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  9. Mark R. Reiff (2011). International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):370-378.score: 1005.0
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  10. Kirsten J. Fisher (2010). Larry May and Zachary Hoskins, Eds., International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Ethics 121 (1):209.score: 1005.0
     
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  11. Kirsten J. Fisher (2010). May , Larry , and Hoskins , Zachary , Eds. International Criminal Law and Philosophy . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. 258. $85.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (1):209-214.score: 1005.0
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  12. Jamie Terence Kelly (2010). The Moral Foundations of International Criminal Law. Journal of Human Rights 9 (4):502-510.score: 918.0
    This article reviews three books written by Larry May concerning the foundations of international criminal law: Crimes Against Humanity: A Normative Account (2005), War Crimes and Just War (2007), and Aggression and Crimes Against Peace (2008).
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  13. Kimberley Brownlee (2013). Digging Up, Dismantling, and Redesigning the Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):169-178.score: 834.0
    The criminal law raises wonderfully thorny foundational questions. Some of these questions are conceptual: What is a plausible conception of crime ? What is a plausible conception of criminal law ? Some of these questions are genealogical: What are the historical and genealogical roots of the criminal law in a particular jurisdiction? Other questions are evaluative: What are the political and moral values on which a given conception of criminal law depends? What kind of rational reconstruction, (...)
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  14. Kristen Hessler (2010). State Sovereignty as an Obstacle to International Criminal Law. In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 786.0
     
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  15. Margaret Martin (2012). International Criminal Law : Between Utopian Dreams and Political Realities. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.score: 786.0
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  16. Dwight Newman (2012). Theorizing Duress and Necessity in International Criminal Law. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.score: 786.0
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  17. Jørn Jacobsen (2014). Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law. Jurisprudence 5 (1):209-216.score: 771.0
    Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law: A Review of Fran?ois Tanguay-Renaud and James Stribopoulos , Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational and International Criminal Law.
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  18. Leslie P. Francis & John G. Francis (2010). International Criminal Courts, the Rule of Law, and the Prevention of Harm : Building Justice in Times of Injustice. In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 771.0
     
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  19. Joanna Kyriakakis (2010). Prosecuting Corporations for International Crimes : The Role for Domestic Criminal Law. In Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.), International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 771.0
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  20. Alfred P. Rubin (1997). Ethics and Authority in International Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 750.0
    The specialised vocabularies of lawyers, ethicists, and political scientists obscure the roots of many real disagreements. In this book, the distinguished American international lawyer Alfred Rubin provides a penetrating account of where these roots lie, and argues powerfully that disagreements which have existed for 3,000 years are unlikely to be resolved soon. Current attempts to make 'war crimes' or 'terrorism' criminal under international law seem doomed to fail for the same reasons that attempts failed in the early (...)
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  21. Andrew Botterell (2013). Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.score: 697.5
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
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  22. Antony Duff (2010). Authority and Responsibility in International Criminal Law. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oup Oxford.score: 693.0
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  23. David Luban (2010). Fairness to Rightness: Jurisdiction, Legality, and the Legitimacy of International Criminal Law. In Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.), The Philosophy of International Law. Oup Oxford.score: 693.0
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  24. Antony Duff (ed.) (1998). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.score: 688.5
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
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  25. Michael S. Moore (1993). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 688.5
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions (...)
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  26. John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 688.5
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose (...)
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  27. Massimo Renzo (2012). Crimes Against Humanity and the Limits of International Criminal Law. Law and Philosophy 31 (4):443-476.score: 687.0
    Crimes against humanity are supposed to have a collective dimension with respect both to their victims and their perpetrators. According to the orthodox view, these crimes can be committed by individuals against individuals, but only in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against the group to which the victims belong. In this paper I offer a new conception of crimes against humanity and a new justification for their international prosecution. This conception has important implications as to which (...)
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  28. Fernando R. Tesón (1998). A Philosophy of International Law. Westview Press.score: 657.0
    Why should sovereign states obey international law? What compels them to owe allegiance to a higher set of rules when each country is its own law of the land? What is the basis of their obligations to each other? Conventional wisdom suggests that countries are too different from one another culturally to follow laws out of mere loyalty to each other or a set of shared moral values. Surely, the prevailing view holds, countries act simply out of self-interest, and (...)
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  29. Charles Covell (1998). Kant and the Law of Peace: A Study in the Philosophy of International Law and International Relations. St. Martin's Press.score: 657.0
    Charles Covell examines the jurisprudential aspects of Kant's international thought, with particular reference to the argument of the treatise Perpetual Peace (1795). The book begins with a general outline of Kant's moral and political philosophy. In the discussion of Perpetual Peace that follows, it is explained how Kant saw law as providing the basis for peace among men and states in the international sphere, and how, in his exposition of the elements of the law of peace, Kant (...)
     
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  30. Anna Goppel & Anne Schwenkenbecher (2012). Philosophy and International Law: Reflections on Interdisciplinary Research Into Terrorism. Ancilla Iuris 111.score: 648.0
    This essay investigates the possibilities and limits of interdisciplinary research into terrorism. It is shown that approaches that combine philosophy and international law are necessary, and when such an approach needs to be adopted. However, it is also important not to underestimate how much of a challenge is posed by the absence of agreement concerning the definition of terrorism, and also by the structural differences in the way the two disciplines address the problem and formulate the issues. Not (...)
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  31. John Gardner (2007). Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 643.5
    The wrongness of rape -- Rationality and the rule of law in offences against the person -- Complicity and causality -- In defence of defences -- Justifications and reasons -- The gist of excuses -- Fletcher on offences and defences -- Provocation and pluralism -- The mark of responsibility -- The functions and justifications of criminal law and punishment -- Crime : in proportion and in perspective -- Reply to critics.
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  32. Douglas N. Husak (2010). The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 639.0
    Does criminal liability require an act? -- Motive and criminal liability -- The costs to criminal theory of supposing that intentions are irrelevant to permissibility -- Transferred intent -- The nature and justifiability of nonconsummate offenses -- Strict liability, justice, and proportionality -- The sequential principle of relative culpability -- Willful ignorance, knowledge, and the equal culpability thesis : a study of the significance of the principle of legality -- Rapes without rapists : consent and reasonable mistake (...)
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  33. Samantha Besson & John Tasioulas (eds.) (2010). The Philosophy of International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 616.5
    The other contributions address philosophical problems arising in specific domains of international law, such as human rights law, international economic law, ...
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  34. Douglas Husak (2013). The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Extending the Debates. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):351-365.score: 616.5
    Larry Alexander and Peter Westen each critically examine different topics from my recent collection of essays, The Philosophy of Criminal Law. Alexander focuses on my “Rapes Without Rapists,” “Mistake of Law and Culpability,” and “Already Punished Enough.” Westen offers a more extended commentary on my “Transferred Intent.” I briefly reply to each critic in turn and try to extend the debates in new directions.
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  35. H. G. Callaway (2012). Review of Cassese, Five Masters of International Law. [REVIEW] Law and Politics Book Review 22 (1):154-161.score: 613.0
    Focused on five prominent scholars of international law, and casting light on the related institutions which frequently engaged them, the present book provides insight into chief currents of international law during the last decades of the twentieth century. Spanning the gap, in some degree, between Anglo-American and continental approaches to international law, the volume consists of short intellectual portraits, combined with interviews, of selected specialists in international law. The interviews were conducted by the editor, Antonio Cassese, (...)
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  36. Douglas N. Husak (1987). Philosophy of Criminal Law. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 603.0
     
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  37. Lennart Nordenfelt (1992). On Crime, Punishment, and Psychiatric Care: An Introduction to Swedish Philosophy of Criminal Law and Forensic Psychiatry. Almqvist & Wiksell International.score: 603.0
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  38. Youngjae Lee (2014). What is Philosophy of Criminal Law? Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):671-685.score: 598.5
    Introduction: State-Centered and Individual-Centered TheoriesWhat is philosophy of criminal law? The seventeen essays in this book, as a whole, provide an excellent place to start in answering that question. Editors John Deigh and David Dolinko state that they put together this volume of “seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the philosophy of the criminal law” in order to create “an authoritative handbook” representing “the state of current research on the major topics in the field that (...)
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  39. Gwyneth C. McClendon (2009). Building the Rule of International Criminal Law: The Role of Judges and Prosecutors in the Apprehension of War Criminals. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (3):349-372.score: 598.5
    International criminal tribunals are weak institutions, especially since they do not have their own police forces to execute arrest warrants. Understandably then, much of the existing literature has focused exclusively on pressure from major powers and on changing domestic politics to explain the apprehension of suspected war criminals. In contrast, this article turns attention back to the tribunals themselves. I propose three ways in which the activities of international criminal tribunals impact compliance with arrest warrants: through (...)
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  40. Larry May (2007). The Moral Foundations of International Criminal Law. Social Philosophy Today 23:243-248.score: 597.0
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  41. H. B. Jacobini (1954/1979). A Study of the Philosophy of International Law as Seen in Works of Latin American Writers. Hyperion Press.score: 576.0
  42. William Galbraith Miller (1884/1979). Lectures on the Philosophy of Law, Designed Mainly as an Introduction to the Study of International Law. F. B. Rothman.score: 576.0
     
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  43. Thomas Morawetz (ed.) (1991). Criminal Law. New York University Press.score: 552.0
    This Major Reference series brings together a wide range of key international articles in law and legal theory. Many of these essays are not readily accessible, and their presentation in these volumes will provide a vital new resource for both research and teaching. Each volume is edited by leading international authorities who explain the significance and context of articles in an informative and complete introduction.
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  44. Tracy Isaacs (forthcoming). International Criminal Courts and Political Reconciliation. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-10.score: 546.0
    In A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation, Colleen Murphy devotes a full chapter to arguing that international criminal trials make significant contributions to political reconciliation within post-conflict and transitional societies. While she is right to claim that these trials serve an important function, I take issue with her with respect to what that important function is. Whereas Murphy focuses on the contributions international criminal prosecutions might make to political reconciliation within the borders of transitional societies, I (...)
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  45. Kai Ambos (2013). Punishment Without a Sovereign? The Ius Puniendi Issue of International Criminal Law: A First Contribution Towards a Consistent Theory of International Criminal Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33 (2):293-315.score: 526.5
    Current International Criminal Law (ICL) suffers from at least four fairly serious theoretical shortcomings. First, as a starting point, the concept and meaning of ICL in its different variations must be clarified (‘the concept and meaning issue’). Second, the question of whether and how punitive power can exist at the supranational level without a sovereign (‘the ius puniendi issue’) must be answered in a satisfactory manner. Third, the overall function or purpose of ICL as opposed to national (...) law (‘the overall function issue’) must be more convincingly explained. Fourth, the purposes of punishment in ICL, as opposed to the traditional purposes discussed in national criminal law, must be elaborated (‘the purposes of punishment issue’). There is a partly vertical and partly horizontal relationship between these issues. It is, for example, of course impossible to reflect upon ius puniendi, overall function and purposes of punishment without having clarified the concept of ICL in the first place. Also, a treatment of overall function and purposes of punishment seems to be predicated on the justification of the ius puniendi. Indeed, the lack of a satisfactory answer to the ius puniendi issue is maybe the most important theoretical weakness of current ICL. This article therefore aims to demonstrate that a supranational ius puniendi can be inferred from a combination of the incipient supranationality of the world order (understood normatively as an order of values) and the concept of a world society composed of world citizens whose law—the ‘world citizen law’ (‘Weltbürgerrecht’)—is derived from universal, indivisible and interculturally recognized human rights predicated upon a Kantian concept of human dignity. The incipient world order and the world society are represented by the international community (to be understood as a community of values) which becomes the holder of the ius puniendi. (shrink)
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  46. Massimo Renzo (2010). A Criticism of the International Harm Principle. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):267-282.score: 522.0
    According to the received view crimes like torture, rape, enslavement or enforced prostitution are domestic crimes if they are committed as isolated or sporadic events, but become crimes against humanity when they are committed as part of a ‘widespread or systematic attack’ against a civilian population. Only in the latter case can these crimes be prosecuted by the international community. One of the most influential accounts of this idea is Larry May’s International Harm Principle, which states that crimes (...)
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  47. Matt Matravers (2011). John Gardner: Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):231-235.score: 513.0
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  48. Douglas Husak (2009). Gardner on the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (1):169-187.score: 513.0
    Offences and Defences is an outstanding collection of eleven of John Gardner's previously published papers in the philosophy of criminal law. I briefly examine his views on five central issues: his claims about basic responsibility and whether it should be construed as relational; his positions on agent neutrality; his arguments about whether moral and criminal wrongs are typically strict; his thoughts about the structure of defences, and, finally, what his account of rape reveals about the content of (...)
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  49. Antony Duff & N. E. Simmonds (eds.) (1984). Philosophy and the Criminal Law. Steiner.score: 508.5
     
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  50. Alon Harel (forthcoming). R. A. Duff, Lindsay Farmer, S. E. Marshall, Massimo Renzo and Victor Tadros (Eds): The Constitution of the Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-8.score: 501.0
    This book is a collection consisting of an introduction and nine essays that explore foundational aspects of criminal law. As the introduction makes clear, the book is eclectic and the essays can be classified under three main headings. The first group of essays explores the political constitution of criminal law as part of the institutional structure of the state. The second group of essays investigates the question of the authority of criminal law and its potential to create (...)
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