Search results for 'International relations Study and teaching' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Klaus Segbers & Kerstin Imbusch (eds.) (2000). The Globalization of Eastern Europe: Teaching International Relations Without Borders. Lit.score: 186.0
     
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  2. Patrick Thaddeus Jackson (2010). The Conduct of Inquiry in International Relations: Philosophy of Science and its Implications for the Study of World Politics. Routledge.score: 126.0
    The immense value of this book is its accessibility and the intimate connections it builds between theories of international relations and their philosophical ...
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  3. Russell Daye (2009). Poverty, Race Relations, and the Practices of International Business: A Study of Fiji. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):115 - 127.score: 117.0
    This article examines the practices of international business in the South Pacific island nation of Fiji. After an investigation of past practices of international businesses and the ways these have helped to shape the major social challenges confronting the nation today, the article turns to an exploration of those challenges, especially poverty and race relations. It is argued that there are two paramount responsibilities for international business operating in a context like Fiji: to conduct their business (...)
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  4. Daniel McArthur (2011). The Conduct of Inquiry in International Relations: The Philosophy of Science and its Implications for the Study of World Politics (Review). Education and Culture 27 (2):97-100.score: 114.0
    Book reviews in this journal usually proceed by considering the value of the book in question for Dewey scholarship. In this case I would rather say that this book is of interest to Dewey scholars. Jackson’s general project is heavily informed by Dewey’s pluralistic brand of pragmatism. As Jackson notes “Dewey’s Logic . . . stand[s] firmly in the tradition leading to this book” (216). Dewey scholars will greet Jackson’s extension of this approach to the study of international (...)
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  5. Ulrich Franke & Ralph Weber, At the Papini Hotel – On Pragmatism in the Study of International Relations.score: 114.0
    Pragmatism is ever more popular amongst those who study international relations. Its emphasis on practice is generally acknowledged as a defining characteristic. There is, however, a general tension within pragmatist thought concerning practice, for pragmatism may emphasize the theorizing of practice. It is, then, distinguished from other theories in International Relations (IR) such as neo-realism or constructivism as a contender in their midst. We delineate a pragmatist theory of IR in the first part of this (...)
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  6. Rosemary Foot, John Lewis Gaddis & Andrew Hurrell (eds.) (2003). Order and Justice in International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 109.5
    The relationship between international order and justice has long been central to the study and practice of international relations. For most of the twentieth century, states and international society gave priority to a view of order that focused on the minimum conditions for coexistence in a pluralist, conflictual world. Justice was seen either as secondary or sometimes even as a challenge to order. Recent developments have forced a reassessment of this position. This book sets current (...)
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  7. Cornelia Navari (ed.) (2009). Theorising International Society: English School Methods. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 109.5
  8. Ralph Pettman (2001). World Politics: Rationalism and Beyond. Palgrave.score: 100.5
    This book provides an overview of the entire discipline of world affairs in a way that makes immediate sense. It is also a critique of the limits that rationalism sets on how we know world affairs, showing how we might transcend these limits by augmenting rationalist research with non-rationalist techniques. It should appeal to anyone interested in why analysts so often seem to explain world affairs inaccurately and misunderstand what these affairs mean.
     
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  9. Charles Covell (1998). Kant and the Law of Peace: A Study in the Philosophy of International Law and International Relations. St. Martin's Press.score: 97.5
    Charles Covell examines the jurisprudential aspects of Kant's international thought, with particular reference to the argument of the treatise Perpetual Peace (1795). The book begins with a general outline of Kant's moral and political philosophy. In the discussion of Perpetual Peace that follows, it is explained how Kant saw law as providing the basis for peace among men and states in the international sphere, and how, in his exposition of the elements of the law of peace, Kant broke (...)
     
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  10. Colin Wight (2006). Agents, Structures and International Relations: Politics as Ontology. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    The agent-structure problem is a much discussed issue in the field of international relations. In his comprehensive analysis of this problem, Colin Wight deconstructs the accounts of structure and agency embedded within differing IR theories and, on the basis of this analysis, explores the implications of ontology - the metaphysical study of existence and reality. Wight argues that there are many gaps in IR theory that can only be understood by focusing on the ontological differences that construct (...)
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  11. A. Nuri Yurdusev (2003). International Relations and the Philosophy of History: A Civilizational Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 96.0
    International Relations and the Philosophy of History examines the concept of civilization in relation to international systems through an extensive use of the literature in the philosophy of history. A. Nuri Yurdusev demonstrates the relevance of a civilizational approach to the study of contemporary international relations by looking at the multi-civilizational nature of the modern international system, the competing claims of national and civilizational identities and the rise of civilizational consciousness after the Cold (...)
     
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  12. Scott Burchill (ed.) (2005). Theories of International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 86.0
    The fully updated and revised third edition of this widely used text provides a comprehensive survey of leading perspectives in the field including an entirely new chapter on Realism by Jack Donnelly. The introduction explains the nature of theory and the reasons for studying international relations in a theoretically informed way. The nine chapters which follow--written by leading scholars in the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand--provide thorough examinations of each of the major approaches currently prevailing (...)
     
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  13. C. Delisle Burns (1940). Book Review:The Twenty Years Crisis, 1919-1939: An Introduction to the Study of International Relations. E. H. Carr. [REVIEW] Ethics 50 (3):344-.score: 85.5
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  14. Mehran Mazinani (2012). Patrick Thaddeus Jackson, The Conduct of Inquiry in International Relations: Philosophy of Science and its Implications for the Study of World Politics. New York: Routledge, 2011. ISBN 978-0-415-77627-1, Paperback, $37. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (4):532-534.score: 85.5
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  15. Sangjoon Kim & Seung-Won Suh (2010). Expanding Focus on Japan and the Bounded Dynamism of Japanese International Relations Studies in South Korea. Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (3):367-387.score: 85.0
    Unlike in Western academia, Japanese studies in Korea have not receded, but rather have rather vigorously refocused on Japan during the last two decades. This paper examines the rapid development and governing dynamics of the Japanese politics studies (JPS), with a particular focus on Japanese international relations studies (JIRS). It answers the following four questions. How does JIRS perceive, measure, and interpret Japan? What are the outstanding features of JIRS? What are the internal dynamics in the JPS community? (...)
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  16. Filiz Coban (2008). An Alternative Ontology in the International Relations Studies. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:101-108.score: 84.8
    Ontological issues are crucial and remarkable for International Relations scholars due to answering main questions of the dicipline as ‘what we observe in world politics’, ‘what’s going on’, ‘how states define who they are’ and ‘how states treat each other in interaction in terms of power and interests’. After Cold War debate on the end of the ideological clashes and the rise of the ‘clash of civilization’ have been begun and all the massacres that have taken place in (...)
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  17. Keisuke Iida (2010). Japanese Political Studies and Japanese International Relations in China, Japan, and Korea. Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (3):275-289.score: 84.0
    This article summarizes the findings of this special issue focusing on five questions: (1) who studies Japanese politics and international relations in China, Japan and the Republic of Korea?; (2) what is being studied in each of these countries?; 3) how are Japanese politics studied in each of these countries?; (3) what determines the nature of the study of Japanese politics and international relations?; and 4) what is the impact of the study of Japanese (...)
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  18. Koji Murata (2010). The Evolution of Japanese Studies of International Relations. Japanese Journal of Political Science 11 (3):355-365.score: 84.0
    This paper aims to examine the evolution of Japanese studies of international relations since the end of World War II. In so doing, in particular, this paper first looks at the dominant trends and characteristics of Japanese scholarship in this field, and, second, the correlations between the scholarship and Japan's experiences in real international relations. In discussing the evolution of Japanese studies of international relations, I shall divide the years since 1945 into three separate (...)
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  19. Robert H. Jackson (2007). Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    This highly successful textbook provides a systematic introduction to the principal theories of international relations. Combining incisive and original analyses with a clear and accessible writing style, it is ideal for introductory courses in international relations or international relations theory. Introduction to International Relations, Third Edition, focuses on the main theoretical traditions--realism, liberalism, international society, and theories of international political economy. The authors carefully explain how particular theories organize and sharpen (...)
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  20. Andrew Linklater (ed.) (2000). International Relations: Critical Concepts in Political Science. Routledge.score: 81.0
    Reprinting more than 80 essential papers published in the 20th century, this set is the most comprehensive collection to appear to date. The papers include "classics" in the field as well as ones placing International Relations in a wider context, from the late 1940s to the present day. An invaluable resource for all students of this field.
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  21. Emanuel Adler (2005). Communitarian International Relations: The Epistemic Foundations of International Relations. Routledge.score: 81.0
    In Emanuel Adler's distinctive constructivist approach to international relations theory, international practices evolve in tandem with collective knowledge of the material and social worlds. This book - comprising a selection of his journal publications, a new introduction and three previously unpublished articles - points IR constructivism in a novel direction, characterized as 'communitarian'. Adler's synthesis does not herald the end of the nation-state; nor does it suggest that agency is unimportant in international life. Rather, it argues (...)
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  22. Beate Jahn (ed.) (2006). Classical Theory in International Relations. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    Classical political theorists such as Thucydides, Kant, Rousseau, Smith, Hegel, Grotius, Mill, Locke and Clausewitz are often employed to explain and justify contemporary international politics and are seen to constitute the different schools of thought in the discipline. However, traditional interpretations frequently ignore the intellectual and historical context in which these thinkers were writing as well as the lineages through which they came to be appropriated in International Relations. This collection of essays provides alternative interpretations sensitive to (...)
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  23. Maja Zehfuss (2002). Constructivism in International Relations: The Politics of Reality. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    Maya Zehfuss critiques constructivist theories of international relations (currently considered to be at the cutting edge of the discipline) and finds them wanting and even politically dangerous. Zehfuss uses Germany's first shift toward using its military abroad after the end of the Cold War to illustrate why constructivism does not work and how it leads to particular analytical outcomes and forecloses others. She argues that scholars are limiting their abilities to act responsibly in international relations by (...)
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  24. Christine Sylvester (1994). Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    This book evaluates the major debates around which the discipline of international relations has developed in the light of contemporary feminist theories. The three debates (realist versus idealist, scientific versus traditional, modernist versus postmodernist) have been subject to feminist theorising since the earliest days of known feminist activities, with the current emphasis on feminist, empiricist standpoint and postmodernist ways of knowing. Christine Sylvester shows how feminist theorising could have affected our understanding of international relations had it (...)
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  25. Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.) (2009). Critical Theorists and International Relations. Routledge.score: 81.0
    Covering a broad range of approaches within critical theory including Marxism and post-Marxism, the Frankfurt School, hermeneutics, phenomenology, postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, poststructuralism, pragmatism, scientific realism, deconstruction and psychoanalysis, this book provides students with a comprehensive and accessible introduction to 32 key critical theorists whose work has been influential in the field of international relations.
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  26. Abigail E. Ruane (2012). The International Relations of Middle-Earth: Learning From the Lord of the Rings. University of Michigan Press.score: 81.0
    Introduction: Middle-Earth, The lord of the rings, and international relations -- Order, justice, and Middle-Earth -- Thinking about international relations and Middle-Earth -- Middle-Earth and three great debates in international relations -- Middle-Earth, levels of analysis, and war -- Middle-Earth and feminist theory -- Middle-Earth and feminist analysis of conflict -- Middle-Earth as a source of inspiration and enrichment -- Conclusion: international relations and our many worlds.
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  27. Alexander Astrov (2005). On World Politics: R.G. Collingwood, Michael Oakeshott, and Neotraditionalism in International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 81.0
    This book outlines an idea of world politics as thinking and speaking about the conditions of world order. World order is understood not as an arrangement of entities but a complex of variously situated activities conducted by individuals as members of diverse associations of their own. Within contemporary international relations it entails a theoretical position, neotraditionalism, as a reformulation of the initial "traditionalist" approach in the wake of rationalism and subsequent reflectivist critique.
     
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  28. Molly Cochran (1999). Normative Theory in International Relations: A Pragmatic Approach. Cambridge University Press.score: 81.0
    Molly Cochran offers an account of the development of normative theory in international relations over the past two decades. In particular, she analyzes the tensions between cosmopolitan and communitarian approaches to international ethics, paying attention to differences in their treatments of a concept of the person, the moral standing of states and the scope of moral arguments. The book draws connections between this debate and the tension between foundationalist and antifoundationalist thinking and offers an argument for a (...)
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  29. Robert H. Jackson (1999). Introduction to International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Offering a unique, theory-based approach to international relations, An Introduction to International Relations provides readers with an ideal entry into the discipline. Succinct and clearly written, it covers the principal theories in the field, including the post-positivist theories that have gained prominence in recent years.
     
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  30. Daniel J. Levine (2012). Recovering International Relations: The Promise of Sustainable Critique. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Introduction: sustainable critique and the lost vocation of international relations -- "For we born after:" the challenge of sustainable critique -- Sustainable critique and critical IR theory: against emancipation -- The realist dilemma: politics and the limits of theory -- Communitarian IR theory -- Individualist IR theory: disharmonious cooperation -- Conclusion: toward sustainably critical international theory.
     
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  31. Stephanie G. Neuman (ed.) (1998). International Relations Theory and the Third World. St. Martin's Press.score: 70.5
    In this collected volume, the authors analyze the deficiencies of existing theory and present alternate explanations of Third World foreign policy behavior. The essays show how examining Third World experience can broaden our understanding of how and why states and non-state actors interact in the international system.
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  32. Necati Polat (2012). International Relations, Meaning and Mimesis. Routledge.score: 70.5
    Introduction -- International -- Peace -- Difference -- Law -- Integration.
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  33. Badredine Arfi (2012). Re-Thinking International Relations Theory Via Deconstruction. Routledge.score: 70.5
    Re-thinking via deconstruction qua affirmation -- "Testimonial faith" in/about IR philosophy of science: the possibility condition of a pluralist science of world politics -- Khôra as the condition of possibility of the ontological without ontology -- Rethinking the "agent-structure" problematique: from ontology to parergonality -- Identity/difference and othering: negotiating the impossible politics of aporia -- Autoimmunity of trust without trust -- Rethinking international constitutional order: the autoimmune politics of binding without binding -- The quest for "illogical" logics of action (...)
     
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  34. Renée Jeffery (2008). Evil and International Relations: Human Suffering in an Age of Terror. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 70.5
    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the concept of 'evil' has enjoyed renewed popularity in both international political rhetoric and scholarly writing. World leaders, politicians, and intellectuals have increasingly turned to 'evil' to describe the very worst humanitarian atrocities that continue to mark international affairs. However, precisely what 'evil' actually entails is not well understood. Little consensus exists as to what 'evil' is, how it is manifested in the international sphere, and what we ought to (...)
     
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  35. Robert Schuett (2010). Classical Realism, Freud and Human Nature in International Relations. History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):21-46.score: 69.0
    Classical realism is enjoying a renaissance in the study of international relations. It is well known that the analytical and normative international-political thought of early 20th-century classical realists is based on assumptions about human nature. Yet current knowledge of these assumptions remains limited. This article therefore revisits and examines the nature and intellectual roots of the human nature assumptions of three truly consequential classical realists. The analysis shows — similar to the causa Hans J. Morgenthau — (...)
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  36. Derek Drinkwater (2005). Sir Harold Nicolson and International Relations: The Practitioner as Theorist. OUP Oxford.score: 69.0
    Sir Harold Nicolson (1886-1968) is well known as a diarist, man of letters, diplomatic historian, gardener, and broadcaster. Nicolson's bestselling diaries and letters, his many biographies, including the highly acclaimed official life of King George V, and his numerous essays and broadcasts have made him, in the words of his friend and fellow MP Robert Bernays, an international figure of the 'second degree'. -/- Yet there was more to this urbane man than his finely observed diary, stylish writing, and (...)
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  37. Harald Kleinschmidt (2008). Local Politics and International Relations: The Case of the Relations Between Württemberg and Japan. The European Legacy 1 (2):778-781.score: 69.0
    (1996). Local politics and international relations: The case of the relations between Württemberg and Japan. The European Legacy: Vol. 1, Fourth International Conference of the International Society for the study of European Ideas, pp. 778-781.
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  38. David Long & Brian C. Schmidt (eds.) (2005). Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations. State University of New York Press.score: 67.5
    This book reconstructs in detail some of the formative episodes of the field's early development and arrives at the conclusion that, in actuality, the early ...
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  39. M. A. Muqtedar Khan (2004). Jihad for Jerusalem: Identity and Strategy in International Relations. Praeger.score: 67.5
    Introduction : a divided discipline -- A genealogy of agency -- Reforming a paradigm : constructivism to rational constructivism -- A rational constructivist theory of identity and strategy -- Jerusalem : the unsubstitutable core value -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Israel the tiger 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Iran the cub 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Saudi Arabia the paper tiger 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Jordan the mouse 1967-1997 -- Conclusion : the future of Jerusalem.
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  40. Knud Erik Jørgensen (2010). International Relations Theory: A New Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 67.5
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  41. Anthony F. Lang & John Williams (eds.) (2005). Hannah Arendt and International Relations: Readings Across the Lines. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 67.5
    Hannah Arendt's approach to politics focuses on action and conduct, rather than institutions, constitutions, and states. In light of Arendtian conceptions of politics, essays in this book challenge conventional IR theories. The contributions on agency explore concepts and categories of political action that enable individuals to act politically and to re-make the world in new, unpredictable ways. The contributions on structure explore how Arendt provides new critical purchase upon often reified structures and categories.
     
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  42. Cerwyn Moore & Chris Farrands (eds.) (2010). International Relations Theory and Philosophy: Interpretive Dialogues. Routledge.score: 67.5
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  43. Shane Ralston (2011). Pragmatism in International Relations Theory and Research. Eidos 14:72-105.score: 67.5
    Este artículo examina la literatura reciente sobre la intersección entre pragmatismo filosófico y relaciones internacionales (RI), incluyendo la teoría y la metodología de investigación de las RI. Se sostiene que uno de los obstáculos que motivan las teorías y metodologías pragmatistas de las RI es la dificultad de definir el pragmatismo, en particular si existe la necesidad de una definición más genérica de pragmatismo, o una más específica que se vincule con las metas de teóricos e investigadores de las relaciones (...)
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  44. Sybille Reinke de Buitrago (ed.) (2012). Portraying the Other in International Relations: Cases of Othering, Their Dynamics and the Potential for Transformation. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.score: 67.5
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  45. D. G. Williamson (2009). War and Peace: International Relations 1878-1941. Hodder Education.score: 67.5
     
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  46. Marysia Zalewski (2013). Feminist International Relations: Exquisite Corpse. Routledge.score: 67.5
  47. Gil Friedman (1997). Agency, Structure, and International Politics: From Ontology to Empirical Inquiry. Routledge.score: 64.5
    This book is the first in-depth study of the concepts of agency and structure in the context of international relations and politics. It is an important contribution, examing the ways in which explanations of social phenomenon integrate and account for the interrelationship between agency and structure.
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  48. Patrick James (2004). Systemism, Social Mechanisms, and Scientific Progress: A Case Study of the International Crisis Behavior Project. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (3):352-370.score: 64.5
    Systemism and social mechanisms, as articulated by Bunge, are concepts with great potential for application to assessment of research progress. This study will use the conceptual tools made available by systemism and social mechanisms to evaluate the International Crisis Behavior (ICB) Project as a scientific effort toward the greater understanding of crises in world politics. Systemism and social mechanisms are articulated as key concepts in the quest for scientific progress. The goals and basic characteristics of the ICB Project (...)
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  49. Kimberly Hutchings (1999). International Political Theory: Rethinking Ethics in a Global Era. Sage Publications.score: 64.5
    This book provides an invaluable overview of the competing schools of thought in traditional and contemporary normative international theory and seeks to provide a new basis for doing international political theory and thinking about ethics in world politics today. · Part one explains the role and place of normative theory in the study of international politics before critically examining mainstream approaches in international relations and applied ethics. Here the student is introduced to the central (...)
     
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  50. Hayward R. Alker (1996). Rediscoveries and Reformulations: Humanistic Methodologies for International Studies. Cambridge University Press.score: 63.5
    This book provides a distinctive and rich conception of methodology within international studies. From a rereading of the works of leading Western thinkers about international studies, Hayward Alker rediscovers a 'neo-Classical' conception of international relations which is both humanistic and scientific. He draws on the work of classical authors such as Aristotle and Thucydides; modern writers like Machiavelli, Vico, Marx, Weber, Deutsch and Bull; and post-modern writers like Havel, Connolly and Toulmin. The central challenge addressed is (...)
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