Search results for 'Interoception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Beate M. Herbert & Olga Pollatos (2012). The Body in the Mind: On the Relationship Between Interoception and Embodiment. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):692-704.score: 24.0
    The processing, representation, and perception of bodily signals (interoception) plays an important role for human behavior. Theories of embodied cognition hold that higher cognitive processes operate on perceptual symbols and that concept use involves reactivations of the sensory-motor states that occur during experience with the world. Similarly, activation of interoceptive representations and meta-representations of bodily signals supporting interoceptive awareness are profoundly associated with emotional experience and cognitive functions. This article gives an overview over present findings and models on (...) and mechanisms of embodiment and highlights its relevance for disorders that are suggested to represent a translation deficit of bodily states into subjective feelings and self-awareness. (shrink)
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  2. Hugo D. Critchley Anil K. Seth, Keisuke Suzuki (2011). An Interoceptive Predictive Coding Model of Conscious Presence. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 14.0
    We describe a theoretical model of the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying conscious presence. The model is based on interoceptive prediction error and is informed by predictive models of agency, general models of hierarchical predictive coding and dopaminergic signalling in cortex, the role of the anterior insular cortex in interoception and emotion, and cognitive neuroscience evidence from studies of virtual reality and of psychiatric disorders of presence, specifically depersonalization/derealization disorder. The model associates presence with successful ‘explaining away’ by top-down predictions of (...)
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  3. Laura Crucianelli, Nicola Kay Metcalf, Aikaterini Fotopoulou & Paul Mark Jenkinson (2013). Bodily Pleasure Matters: Velocity of Touch Modulates Body Ownership During the Rubber Hand Illusion. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
    The sense of body ownership represents a fundamental aspect of our self-consciousness. Influential experimental paradigms, such as the rubber hand illusion (RHI), in which a seen rubber hand is experienced as part of one’s body when one’s own unseen hand receives congruent tactile stimulation, have extensively examined the role of exteroceptive, multisensory integration on body ownership. However, remarkably, despite the more general current interest in the nature and role of interoception in emotion and consciousness, no study has investigated how (...)
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  4. Mascha Van 'T. Wout, Sara Faught & David Menino (2013). Does Interoceptive Awareness Affect the Ability to Regulate Unfair Treatment by Others? Frontiers in Psychology 4:880.score: 8.0
    In this study we aimed to investigate how awareness of bodily responses, referred to as interoceptive awareness, influences decision-making in a social interactive context. Interoceptive awareness is thought to be crucial for adequate regulation of one’s emotions. However, there is a dearth of studies that examine the association between interoceptive awareness and the ability to regulate emotions during interpersonal decision-making. Here, we quantified interoceptive awareness with a heartbeat detection task in which we measured the difference between subjective self-reports and an (...)
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  5. Anil K. Seth & Hugo D. Critchley (2013). Extending Predictive Processing to the Body: Emotion as Interoceptive Inference. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):227-228.score: 8.0
    The Bayesian brain hypothesis provides an attractive unifying framework for perception, cognition, and action. We argue that the framework can also usefully integrate interoception, the sense of the internal physiological condition of the body. Our model of entails a new view of emotion as interoceptive inference and may account for a range of psychiatric disorders of selfhood.
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  6. Mog Stapleton (2013). Steps to a "Properly Embodied" Cognitive Science. Cognitive Systems Research 22 (June):1-11.score: 7.0
    Cognitive systems research has predominantly been guided by the historical distinction between emotion and cognition, and has focused its efforts on modelling the “cognitive” aspects of behaviour. While this initially meant modelling only the control system of cognitive creatures, with the advent of “embodied” cognitive science this expanded to also modelling the interactions between the control system and the external environment. What did not seem to change with this embodiment revolution, however, was the attitude towards affect and emotion in cognitive (...)
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  7. Shawn Hayley Diane Sliz (2012). Major Depressive Disorder and Alterations in Insular Cortical Activity: A Review of Current Functional Magnetic Imaging Research. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 7.0
    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysregulated fronto-limbic network. The hyperactivation of limbic regions leads to increased attention and processing of emotional information, with a bias toward negative stimuli. Pathological ruminative behavior is a common symptom of depressive disorder whereby the individual is unable to disengage from internal mental processing of emotionally-salient events. In fact, lower deactivations of the neural baseline resting state may account for the increased internal self-focus. The insular cortex, with its extensive connections to fronto-limbic (...)
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  8. Luca Barlassina & Albert Newen (2013). The Role of Bodily Perception in Emotion: In Defense of an Impure Somatic Theory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1).score: 6.0
    In this paper, we develop an impure somatic theory of emotion, according to which emotions are constituted by the integration of bodily perceptions with representations of external objects, events, or states of affairs. We put forward our theory by contrasting it with Prinz's (2004) pure somatic theory, according to which emotions are entirely constituted by bodily perceptions. After illustrating Prinz's theory and discussing the evidence in its favor, we show that it is beset by serious problems—i.e., it gets the neural (...)
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  9. Mog Stapleton (2012). Proper Embodiment: The Role of the Body in Affect and Cognition. Dissertation, University of Edinburghscore: 6.0
    Embodied cognitive science has argued that cognition is embodied principally in virtue of grossmorphological and sensorimotor features. This thesis argues that cognition is also internally embodied in affective and fine-grained physiological features whose transformative roles remain mostlyunnoticed in contemporary cognitive science. I call this ‘proper embodiment’. I approach this larger subject by examining various emotion theories in philosophy and psychology. These tend to emphasiseone of the many gross components of emotional processes, such as ‘feeling’ or ‘judgement’ to thedetriment of the (...)
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  10. Antoine Lutz, Interoceptive Awareness in Experienced Meditators.score: 6.0
    Attention to internal body sensations is practiced in most meditation traditions. Many traditions state that this practice results in increased awareness of internal body sensations, but scientific studies evaluating this claim are lacking. We predicted that experienced meditators would display performance superior to that of nonmeditators on heartbeat detection, a standard noninvasive measure of resting interoceptive awareness. We compared two groups of meditators (Tibetan Buddhist and Kundalini) to an age- and body mass index-matched group of nonmeditators. Contrary to our prediction, (...)
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  11. Richard J. Davidson, Interoceptive Awareness in Experienced Meditators.score: 6.0
    Attention to internal body sensations is practiced in most meditation traditions. Many traditions state that this practice results in increased awareness of internal body sensations, but scientific studies evaluating this claim are lacking. We predicted that experienced meditators would display performance superior to that of nonmeditators on heartbeat detection, a standard noninvasive measure of resting interoceptive awareness. We compared two groups of meditators (Tibetan Buddhist and Kundalini) to an age- and body mass index-matched group of nonmeditators. Contrary to our prediction, (...)
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  12. Joshua Ian Davis & Arthur B. Markman (2012). Embodied Cognition as a Practical Paradigm: Introduction to the Topic, The Future of Embodied Cognition. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):685-691.score: 6.0
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  13. Hugo D. Critchley, Stefan Wiens, Pia Rotshtein, Arne Öhman & Raymond J. Dolan (2004). Neural Systems Supporting Interoceptive Awareness. Nature Neuroscience 7 (2):189-195.score: 5.0
  14. Antoine Bechara & Nasir Naqvi (2004). Listening to Your Heart: Interoceptive Awareness as a Gateway to Feeling. Nature Neuroscience 7 (2):102-103.score: 5.0
  15. Olga Pollatos, Eva Traut-Mattausch, Heike Schroeder & Rainer Schandry (2007). Interoceptive Awareness Mediates the Relationship Between Anxiety and the Intensity of Unpleasant Feelings. Journal of Anxiety Disorders 21 (7):931-943.score: 5.0
  16. Olga Pollatos, Klaus Gramann & Rainer Schandry (2007). Neural Systems Connecting Interoceptive Awareness and Feelings. Human Brain Mapping 28 (1):9-18.score: 5.0
  17. Caroline Durlik, Gary Brown & Manos Tsakiris (forthcoming). Enhanced Interoceptive Awareness During Anticipation of Public Speaking is Associated with Fear of Negative Evaluation. Cognition and Emotion:1-11.score: 5.0
  18. A. K. Seth (2013). Interoceptive Inference, Emotion, and the Embodied Self. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (11):565-573.score: 5.0
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  19. Anil K. Seth (forthcoming). Interoceptive Inference: From Decision-Making to Organism Integrity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences.score: 5.0
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  20. A. D. Craig (2013). An Interoceptive Neuroanatomical Perspective on Feelings, Energy, and Effort. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):685-686.score: 5.0
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  21. Peter Sokol-Hessner, Catherine A. Hartley, Jeffrey R. Hamilton & Elizabeth A. Phelps (forthcoming). Interoceptive Ability Predicts Aversion to Losses. Cognition and Emotion:1-7.score: 5.0
  22. Vivien Ainley, Lara Maister, Jana Brokfeld, Harry Farmer & Manos Tsakiris (2013). More of Myself: Manipulating Interoceptive Awareness by Heightened Attention to Bodily and Narrative Aspects of the Self. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1231-1238.score: 5.0
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  23. Caroline Durlik, Flavia Cardini & Manos Tsakiris (2014). Being Watched: The Effect of Social Self-Focus on Interoceptive and Exteroceptive Somatosensory Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 25:42-50.score: 5.0
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  24. Anil K. Seth, Keisuke Suzuki & Hugo D. Critchley (2011). An Interoceptive Predictive Coding Model of Conscious Presence. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 5.0
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  25. Bekinschtein Tristan, Canales-Johnson Andrés, Silva Carolina, Huepe David, Rivera-Rei Alvaro, Noreika Valdas, Del Carmen Garcia Maria, Silva Walter, Sedeño Lucas, Kargieman Lucila, Baglivo Fabricio, Chennu Srivas, Ibanez Agustin & Rodriguez Eugenio (2013). Learn From Your Heart: Dissociable Neural Markers for Objective Interoceptive Performance and Metacognitive Awareness in Auditory Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 5.0
  26. Rhonda M. Merwin, Nancy L. Zucker, Jennie L. Lacy & Camden A. Elliott (2010). Interoceptive Awareness in Eating Disorders: Distinguishing Lack of Clarity From Non-Acceptance of Internal Experience. Cognition and Emotion 24 (5):892-902.score: 5.0
  27. Olga Pollatos & Rainer Schandry (2008). Emotional Processing and Emotional Memory Are Modulated by Interoceptive Awareness. Cognition and Emotion 22 (2):272-287.score: 5.0
  28. An K. Raes & Rudi De Raedt (2011). Interoceptive Awareness and Unaware Fear Conditioning: Are Subliminal Conditioning Effects Influenced by the Manipulation of Visceral Self-Perception? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1393-1402.score: 5.0
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  29. Barnow Sven (2011). Enhanced Interoceptive Awareness in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 5.0
  30. Luann D. Fortune (2011). Essences of Somatic Awareness as Captured in a Verbally Directed Body Scan. Schutzian Research 3:107-119.score: 3.0
    Somatic awareness is bodily sensation imbued with consciousness. Directing and cultivating somatic awareness is a practice fundamental to many therapeutic and spiritual enterprises. Recent developments in neuroscience attempt to explain the operational aspects of somatic awareness. But it has long been a topic of conversation in other paradigms, from philosophy to health care. Somatic input provides information for use in wellness treatment applications, including therapeutic bodywork. Yet few massage therapy scholarly investigations aim to capture the quality of body awareness experience. (...)
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  31. Felix Blankenburg Jakub Limanowski (2013). Minimal Self-Models and the Free Energy Principle. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    The term "minimal phenomenal selfhood" describes the basic, pre-reflective experience of being a self (Blanke & Metzinger, 2009). Theoretical accounts of the minimal self have long recognized the importance and the ambivalence of the body as both part of the physical world, and the enabling condition for being in this world (Gallagher, 2005; Grafton, 2009). A recent account of minimal phenomenal selfhood (MPS, Metzinger, 2004a) centers on the consideration that minimal selfhood emerges as the result of basic self-modeling mechanisms, thereby (...)
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  32. Aikaterini Fotopoulou Charlotte Krahé, Anne Springer, John A. Weinman (2013). The Social Modulation of Pain: Others as Predictive Signals of Salience – a Systematic Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    Several studies in cognitive neuroscience have investigated the cognitive and affective modulation of pain. By contrast, fewer studies have focused on the social modulation of pain, despite a plethora of relevant clinical findings. Here we present the first review of experimental studies addressing how interpersonal factors, such as the presence, behaviour and spatial proximity of an observer, modulate pain. Based on a systematic literature search we identified twenty-six studies on experimentally-induced pain that manipulated different interpersonal variables and measured behavioural, physiological (...)
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  33. Brian Colder (2011). Emulation as an Integrating Principle for Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 3.0
    Emulations, defined as ongoing internal representations of potential actions and the futures those actions are expected to produce, play a critical role in directing human bodily activities. Studies of gross motor behavior, perception, allocation of attention, response to errors, interoception and homeostatic activities, and higher cognitive reasoning suggest that the proper execution of all these functions relies on emulations. Further evidence supports the notion that reinforcement learning in humans is aimed at updating emulations, and that action selection occurs via (...)
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  34. Alvin Goldman & Frederique de Vignemont (2009). Is Social Cognition Embodied? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (10):154-159.score: 1.0
    Theories of embodied cognition abound in the literature, but it is often unclear how to understand them. We offer several interpretations of embodiment, the most interesting being the thesis that mental representations in bodily formats (B-formats) have an important role in cognition. Potential B-formats include motoric, somatosensory, affective and interoceptive formats. The literature on mirroring and related phenomena provides support for a limited-scope version of embodied social cognition under the B-format interpretation. It is questionable, however, whether such a thesis can (...)
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  35. Alvin I. Goldman (2012). A Moderate Approach to Embodied Cognitive Science. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):71-88.score: 1.0
    Many current programs for cognitive science sail under the banner of “embodied cognition.” These programs typically seek to distance themselves from standard cognitive science. The present proposal for a conception of embodied cognition is less radical than most, indeed, quite compatible with many versions of traditional cognitive science. Its rationale is based on two elements, each of which is theoretically plausible and empirically well-founded. The first element invokes the idea of “bodily formats,” i.e., representational codes primarily utilized in forming interoceptive (...)
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  36. Georg Northoff (2008). Are Our Emotional Feelings Relational? A Neurophilosophical Investigation of the James–Lange Theory. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):501-527.score: 1.0
    The James–Lange theory considers emotional feelings as perceptions of physiological body changes. This approach has recently resurfaced and modified in both neuroscientific and philosophical concepts of embodiment of emotional feelings. In addition to the body, the role of the environment in emotional feeling needs to be considered. I here claim that the environment has not merely an indirect and thus instrumental role on emotional feelings via the body and its sensorimotor and vegetative functions. Instead, the environment may have a direct (...)
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  37. Mog Stapleton (2012). Feeling the Strain: Predicting the Third Dimension of Core Affect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):166-167.score: 1.0
    This commentary (1) raises the question about the possible conflation of core affect with the neural representation of interoceptive changes in regard to whether biological value is subpersonal or must be experienced, and (2) proposes that Wundt’s third dimension of core affect – strain-relaxation – can be accounted for in the target model under a generalised predictive model of attention.
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  38. Max Velmans (1990). Consciousness, Brain, and the Physical World. Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):77-99.score: 1.0
    Dualist and Reductionist theories of mind disagree about whether or not consciousness can be reduced to a state of or function of the brain. They assume, however, that the contents of consciousness are separate from the external physical world as-perceived. According to the present paper this assumption has no foundation either in everyday experience or in science. Drawing on evidence for perceptual projection in both interoceptive and exteroceptive sense modalities, the case is made that the physical world as-perceived is a (...)
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  39. Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan M. Schulz, Theresa Stumpf, Paul Pauli & Claus Vögele (2013). Enhanced Cardiac Perception Is Associated With Increased Susceptibility to Framing Effects. Cognitive Science 37 (5):922-935.score: 1.0
    Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The “framing effect” is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decision-making. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss versus gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results (...)
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  40. Georg Northoff (2012). From Emotions to Consciousness – A Neuro-Phenomenal and Neuro-Relational Approach. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 1.0
    The James-Lange theory considers emotional feelings as perceptions of physiological body changes. This approach has recently resurfaced and modified in both neuroscientific and philosophical concepts of embodiment of emotional feelings. In addition to the body, the role of the environment in emotional feeling needs to be considered. I here claim that the environment has not merely an indirect and instrumental i.e. modulatory role on emotional feelings via the body and its sensorimotor and vegetative functions. Instead, the environment may have a (...)
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