Search results for 'Intervention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alex J. Bellamy (2006). Whither the Responsibility to Protect? Humanitarian Intervention and the 2005 World Summit. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (2):143–169.score: 24.0
    At the 2005 World Summit, the world's leaders committed themselves to the "responsibility to protect", recognizing both that all states have a responsibility to protect their citizens from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and that the UN should help states to discharge this responsibility using either peaceful means or enforcement action. This declaration ostensibly marks an important milestone in the relationship between sovereignty and human rights but its critics argue that it will make little difference in (...)
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  2. Dale Jamieson (2005). Duties to the Distant: Aid, Assistance, and Intervention in the Developing World. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):151 - 170.score: 24.0
    In his classic article, Famine, Affluence, and Morality (Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (1972), pp. 229–243), Peter Singer claimed that affluent people in the developed world are morally obligated to transfer large amounts of resources to poor people in the developing world. For present purposes I will not call Singers argument into question. While people can reasonably disagree about exactly how demanding morality is with respect to duties to the desperate, there is little question in my mind that it is (...)
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  3. Steven P. Lee (2010). Humanitarian Intervention - Eight Theories. Diametros 23:22-43.score: 24.0
    Much has been written about the ethics of humanitarian intervention in the past fifteen years. In this paper I discuss a variety of justifications that have been proposed (in fact, seven theories of justification), finding difficulties with each of them, and then I offer a theory of justification of my own. My approach to justification will differ from most of the earlier accounts in two ways. First, I begin the discussion of justification at a different point. Second, I seek (...)
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  4. Ned Dobos (2010). On Altruistic War and National Responsibility: Justifying Humanitarian Intervention to Soldiers and Taxpayers. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):19 - 31.score: 24.0
    The principle of absolute sovereignty may have been consigned to history, but a strong presumption against foreign intervention seems to have been left in its stead. On the dominant view, only massacre and ethnic cleansing justify armed intervention, these harms must be already occurring or imminent, and the prudential constraints on war must be satisfied. Each of these conditions has recently come under pressure. Those looking to defend the dominant view have typically done so by invoking international peace (...)
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  5. Ned Dobos (2010). Is U.N. Security Council Authorisation for Armed Humanitarian Intervention Morally Necessary? Philosophia 38 (3):499-515.score: 24.0
    Relative to the abundance of literature devoted to the legal significance of UN authorisation, little has been written about whether the UN’s failure to sanction an intervention can ever make it immoral. This is the question that I take up here. I argue that UN authorisation (or lack thereof) can have some indirect bearing on the moral status of a humanitarian intervention. That is, it can affect whether an intervention satisfies other widely accepted justifying conditions, such as (...)
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  6. Richard B. Miller (2000). Humanitarian Intervention, Altruism, and the Limits of Casuistry. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (1):3 - 35.score: 24.0
    This essay argues that the ethics of humanitarian intervention cannot be readily subsumed by the ethics of just war without due attention to matters of political and moral motivation. In the modern era, a just war draws directly from self-benefitting motives in wars of self-defense, or indirectly in wars that enforce international law or promote the global common good. Humanitarian interventions, in contrast, are intuitively admirable insofar as they are other-regarding. That difference poses a challenge to the casuistry of (...)
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  7. Rory J. Conces (2001). Justifying Coercive and Non-Coercive Intervention: Strategic and Humanitarian Arguments. Acta Analytica 16 (27):133-52.score: 24.0
    The world's political and military leaders are under increasing pressure to intervene in the affairs of sovereign nations. Although the sovereignty of states and the corollary principle of nonintervention have been part of the foundation of international law, there is some latitude for states, as well as collective security organizations, to intervene in another state's domestic and foreign affairs, thus making sovereignty and the principle less than absolute. In this paper I first sketch a reasonable foundation for sovereignty of states (...)
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  8. Jennifer Szende (2012). Selective Humanitarian Intervention: Moral Reason and Collective Agents. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):63-76.score: 24.0
    This paper examines four interpretations of the observation that humanitarian intervention might be used ‘selectively’ or ‘inconsistently’ in order to elucidate the normative commitments of the deliberative process in international relations. The paper argues that there are several types of concerns that are implicit in the accusation of inconsistency, and only some of them amount to objections to humanitarian intervention as a whole. The paradox of humanitarian intervention is that intervention is prohibited except where the (...) is humanitarian, yet humanitarian reasons never exist in isolation, and it is nearly impossible to determine the real reason for intervention (or any other collective action) in the international arena. The problems revealed by an examination of inconsistency in the example of humanitarian intervention turn out to be general problems with applying the norms of practical reasoning to moral questions dealing with collective agents. (shrink)
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  9. Edward Song (2010). Subjectivist Cosmopolitanism and the Morality of Intervention. Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (2):137-151.score: 24.0
    While cosmopolitans are right to think that state sovereignty is derived from individuals, many cosmopolitan accounts can be too demanding in their expectations for illiberal regimes because they do not account for the attitudes of the persons with who will subject to the intervention. These ‘objectivist’ accounts suggest that sovereignty is wholly a matter of a state’s conformity to the objective demands of justice. In contrast, for ‘subjectivist’ accounts, the attitudes of citizens do matter. Subjectivist cosmopolitans do not deny (...)
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  10. Alex Bellamy & Paul Williams (2006). The UN Security Council and the Question of Humanitarian Intervention in Darfur. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (2):144-160.score: 24.0
    This article explores the different moral and legal arguments used by protagonists in the debate about whether or not to conduct a humanitarian intervention in Darfur. The first section briefly outlines four moral and legal positions on whether there is (and should be) a right and/or duty of humanitarian intervention: communitarianism, restrictionist and counter-restrictionist legal positivism and liberal cosmopolitanism. The second section then provides an overview of the Security Council's debate about responding to Darfur's crisis, showing how its (...)
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  11. António Carvalho & João Arriscado Nunes (2013). Technology, Methodology and Intervention: Performing Nanoethics in Portugal. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 7 (2):149-160.score: 24.0
    During the last few decades we have witnessed a proliferation of exercises dealing with the public participation of citizens in various different dimensions of their societies, including issues of science and technology. On the one hand, these mechanisms provide more robust forms of public engagement with matters that were traditionally dealt with by experts; on the other hand, they raise concerns relating to their design, efficiency or potential for the empowerment of citizens. As part of the EC-funded project DEEPEN (Deepening (...)
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  12. Michael Baumgartner & Isabelle Drouet (2013). Identifying Intervention Variables. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (2):183-205.score: 24.0
    The essential precondition of implementing interventionist techniques of causal reasoning is that particular variables are identified as so-called intervention variables. While the pertinent literature standardly brackets the question how this can be accomplished in concrete contexts of causal discovery, the first part of this paper shows that the interventionist nature of variables cannot, in principle, be established based only on an interventionist notion of causation. The second part then demonstrates that standard observational methods that draw on Bayesian networks identify (...)
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  13. Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire (2012). Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259-268.score: 24.0
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  14. Michael O'Rourke & Stephen J. Crowley (2013). Philosophical Intervention and Cross-Disciplinary Science: The Story of the Toolbox Project. Synthese 190 (11):1937-1954.score: 24.0
    In this article we argue that philosophy can facilitate improvement in cross-disciplinary science. In particular, we discuss in detail the Toolbox Project, an effort in applied epistemology that deploys philosophical analysis for the purpose of enhancing collaborative, cross-disciplinary scientific research through improvements in cross-disciplinary communication. We begin by sketching the scientific context within which the Toolbox Project operates, a context that features a growing interest in and commitment to cross-disciplinary research (CDR). We then develop an argument for the leading idea (...)
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  15. Yongqiang Gao (2011). Government Intervention, Perceived Benefit, and Bribery of Firms in Transitional China. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):175-184.score: 24.0
    This article examines whether (1) government intervention causes bribery (or corruption) as rent-seeking theory suggested; (2) a firm’s perceived benefit partially mediates the relationship between government intervention and its bribing behavior, as rational choice/behavior theory suggested; and (3) other firms’ bribing behavior moderates the relationship between government intervention and a firm’s perceived benefit. Our study shows that government intervention causes bribery/corruption indeed, but it exerts its effect on bribery/corruption through the firm’s perceived benefit. In other words, (...)
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  16. Paul M. Ndebele, Douglas Wassenaar, Esther Munalula & Francis Masiye (2012). Improving Understanding of Clinical Trial Procedures Among Low Literacy Populations: An Intervention Within a Microbicide Trial in Malawi. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):29-.score: 24.0
    Background The intervention reported in this paper was a follow up to an empirical study conducted in Malawi with the aim of assessing trial participants’ understanding of randomisation, double-blinding and placebo use. In the empirical study, the majority of respondents (61.1%; n= 124) obtained low scores (lower than 75%) on understanding of all three concepts under study. Based on these findings, an intervention based on a narrative which included all three concepts and their personal implications was designed. The (...)
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  17. Erik Malmqvist (2006). The Notion of Health and the Morality of Genetic Intervention. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (2):181-192.score: 24.0
    In the present paper it is argued that genetic interventions on human embryos are in principle permissible if they promote the health of the persons that these embryos will one day become and impermissible if they compromise their health. This so called health-intervention principle is reached by, inter alia, rejecting alternative approaches to the problem of the permissibility of genetic intervention. The health-intervention principle can be interpreted in different ways depending on how the notion of health is (...)
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  18. Elena Guerzoni (2006). Intervention Effects on NPIs and Feature Movement: Towards a Unified Account of Intervention. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 14 (4):359-398.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I explore the possibility of understanding locality restrictions on the distribution of Negative Polarity Items (NPIs) as a consequence of covert movement. The present proposal restates Linebarger’s Immediate Scope Constraint in terms of morphology-driven checking requirements. These requirements cannot be met if a blocking element intervenes between the NPI feature and its morphosemantic licenser at Logical Form (LF). The empirical generalization is that the class of NPI ‘blocking expressions’ (a.k.a. ‘interveners’) overlaps to a large extent with interveners (...)
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  19. Saulius Katuoka & Agnė Čepinskytė (2010). Response to Large-Scale Atrocities: Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect. Jurisprudence 121 (3):157-175.score: 24.0
    The United Nations has shown recurrent inability to respond to international threats caused by severe human rights violations and thus failed to perform one of its main function—preservation of international peace and security in the world. This evidenced gaps in the United Nations, caused mainly by the veto right in the voting system within the Security Council and limited powers of the General Assembly. The international community gave a twofold answer to this problem: radical humanitarian intervention and the recent (...)
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  20. Elizabeth Prior Jonson, Margaret Lindorff & Linda McGuire (2012). Paternalism and the Pokies: Unjustified State Interference or Justifiable Intervention? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):259 - 268.score: 24.0
    The Australian Productivity Commission and a Joint Select Committee on Gambling Reform have recommended implementation of a mandatory pre-commitment system for electronic gambling. Organizations associated with the gambling industry have protested that such interventions reduce individual rights, and will cause a reduction in revenue which will cost jobs and reduce gaming venue support for local communities. This article is not concerned with the design details or the evidence base of the proposed scheme, but rather with the fundamental criticism that a (...)
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  21. Gregory A. Miller Laura D. Crocker, Wendy Heller, Stacie L. Warren, Aminda J. O'Hare, Zachary P. Infantolino (2013). Relationships Among Cognition, Emotion, and Motivation: Implications for Intervention and Neuroplasticity in Psychopathology. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Emotion-cognition and motivation-cognition relationships and related brain mechanisms are receiving increasing attention in the clinical research literature as a means of understanding diverse types of psychopathology and improving biological and psychological treatments. This paper reviews and integrates some of the growing evidence for cognitive biases and deficits in depression and anxiety, how these disruptions interact with emotional and motivational processes, and what brain mechanisms appear to be involved. This integration sets the stage for understanding the role of neuroplasticity in implementing (...)
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  22. Rima T. Nakkash, Ahmad Al Mulla, Lena Torossian, Roubina Karhily, Lama Shuayb, Ziyad R. Mahfoud, Ibrahim Janahi, Al A. Al Ansari & Rema A. Afifi (2014). Challenges to Obtaining Parental Permission for Child Participation in a School-Based Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Prevention Intervention in Qatar. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):70.score: 24.0
    Involving children in research studies requires obtaining parental permission. A school-based intervention to delay/prevent waterpipe use for 7th and 8th graders in Qatar was developed, and parental permission requested. Fifty three percent (2308/4314) of the parents returned permission forms; of those 19.5% of the total (840/4314) granted permission. This paper describes the challenges to obtaining parental permission. No research to date has described such challenges in the Arab world.
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  23. Malcolm Hooper Paul Whiteley, Paul Shattock, Ann-Mari Knivsberg, Anders Seim, Karl L. Reichelt, Lynda Todd, Kevin Carr (2012). Gluten- and Casein-Free Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Conditions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Dietary intervention as a tool for maintaining and improving physical health and wellbeing is a widely researched and discussed topic. Speculation that diet may similarly affect mental health and wellbeing particularly in cases of psychiatric and behavioural symptomatology opens up various avenues for potentially improving quality of life. We examine evidence suggestive that a gluten-free, casein-free or combined gluten- and casein-free diet can ameliorate core and peripheral symptoms and improve developmental outcome in some cases of autism spectrum conditions. Although (...)
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  24. Amelia Walter Valsamma Eapen, Rudi Črnčec (2013). Exploring Links Between Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Clinical Predictors of Response to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10% and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioural and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and (...)
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  25. Kevin B. Korb & Erik Nyberg (2006). The Power of Intervention. Minds and Machines 16 (3):289-302.score: 22.0
    We further develop the mathematical theory of causal interventions, extending earlier results of Korb, Twardy, Handfield, & Oppy, (2005) and Spirtes, Glymour, Scheines (2000). Some of the skepticism surrounding causal discovery has concerned the fact that using only observational data can radically underdetermine the best explanatory causal model, with the true causal model appearing inferior to a simpler, faithful model (cf. Cartwright, (2001). Our results show that experimental data, together with some plausible assumptions, can reduce the space of viable explanatory (...)
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  26. Sumner B. Twiss (2006). On Cross-Cultural Conflict and Pediatric Intervention. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):163 - 175.score: 22.0
    A critical examination of Richard Miller's position in his recent "Children, Ethics, and Modern Medicine" on how to handle pediatric interventions in cases of cross-cultural conflict between parents and doctors with respect to treating young children. Particular emphasis is placed on Miller's interpretation of and arguments about a Hmong case extensively researched by Anne Fadiman in her "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down". The conclusion drawn is that Miller's position requires further nuance and development, and some recommendations are (...)
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  27. Peter Spirtes (2011). Intervention, Determinism, and the Causal Minimality Condition. Synthese 182 (3):335-347.score: 21.0
    We clarify the status of the so-called causal minimality condition in the theory of causal Bayesian networks, which has received much attention in the recent literature on the epistemology of causation. In doing so, we argue that the condition is well motivated in the interventionist (or manipulability) account of causation, assuming the causal Markov condition which is essential to the semantics of causal Bayesian networks. Our argument has two parts. First, we show that the causal minimality condition, rather than an (...)
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  28. Esther D. Reed (2012). Responsibility to Protect and Militarized Humanitarian Intervention: When and Why the Churches Failed to Discern Moral Hazard. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):308-334.score: 21.0
    This essay addresses moral hazards associated with the emerging doctrine of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). It reviews the broad acceptance by the Vatican and the World Council of Churches of the doctrine between September 2003 and September 2008, and attempts to identify grounds for more adequate investigation of the moral issues arising. Three themes are pursued: how a changing political context is affecting notions of sovereignty; the authority that can approve or refuse the use of force; and plural foundations (...)
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  29. Johannes Persson (2009). Semmelweis's Methodology From the Modern Stand-Point: Intervention Studies and Causal Ontology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 40 (3):204-209.score: 21.0
    Semmelweis’s work predates the discovery of the power of randomization in medicine by almost a century. Although Semmelweis would not have consciously used a randomized controlled trial (RCT), some features of his material—the allocation of patients to the first and second clinics—did involve what was in fact a randomization, though this was not realised at the time. This article begins by explaining why Semmelweis’s methodology, nevertheless, did not amount to the use of a RCT. It then shows why it is (...)
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  30. Paul Smeyers (2008). Child-Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.score: 21.0
    For Kant, education was understood as the 'means' to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child-centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this 'internal debate', (...)
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  31. Yves Couturier, Chantal Lefebvre, Angèle Bilodeau & Robert Bastien (2013). La compétence à lire et acter les finalités effectives de l'école dans un dispositif partenarial École-Communauté comme condition de réalisation de l'intervention socio-éducative. Phronesis 2 (2-3):36-42.score: 21.0
    Résumé : L’article propose une démarche méthodologique permettant d’identifier la réflexion professionnelle chez des stagiaires en formation à l’enseignement. En effet, la capacité d’analyser sa pratique de façon réflexive est une composante d’une compétence professionnelle à développer selon le Ministère de l’Éducation du Québec. Une certaine forme de réflexion chez les étudiants est donc à acquérir et, du point de vue des tuteurs de stage, à faire acquérir. Quels sont les critères implicites que les enseignants associés des écoles ou les (...)
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  32. Amresh Shrivastava, Megan Johnston & Yves Bureau (2012). Stigma of Mental Illness-2: Non-Compliance and Intervention. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):85.score: 21.0
    The consequences of stigma are preventable. We argue that individual attention should be provided to patients when dealing with stigma. Also, in order to deal with the impact of stigma on an individual basis, it needs to be assessed during routine clinical examinations, quantified and followed up to observe whether or not treatment can reduce its impact. A patient-centric anti-stigma programme that delivers the above is urgently needed. To this end, this review explores the experiences, treatment barriers and consequences due (...)
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  33. Simone Zurbuchen (2010). Vattel's 'Law of Nations ' and the Principle of Non-Intervention. Grotiana 31 (1):69-84.score: 21.0
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  34. Bas van der Vossen (2014). The Morality of Humanitarian Intervention. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell. 404-416.score: 21.0
  35. Philippe Maubant (2013). Intervention et pratique éducative : Reflet et/ou tensions entre instruction, socialisation et qualifications ? Phronesis 2 (2-3):1.score: 21.0
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  36. Andrea Hämmerlein, Uta Müller & Martin Schulz (2011). Pharmacist‐Led Intervention Study to Improve Inhalation Technique in Asthma and COPD Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (1):61-70.score: 21.0
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  37. G. Dowswell, T. Dowswell, J. Lawler, J. Green & J. Young (2002). Patients' and Caregivers' Expectations and Experiences of a Physiotherapy Intervention 1 Year Following Stroke: A Qualitative Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (3):361-365.score: 21.0
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  38. Philippa A. Jackson & David O. Kennedy (2013). The Application of Near Infrared Spectroscopy in Nutritional Intervention Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  39. Hongmin Lai, Yueh‐Hsia Chiu, Ming‐Te Lo, Chun‐Liang Wu, Kai‐Pei Chou, Jiiang‐Huei Jeng & Tony H.‐H. Chen (2008). Community‐Based Randomized Intervention Trial for Periodontal Disease After 18‐Month Follow‐Up [Keelung Community‐Based Integrated Screening (KCIS) No. 4]. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (4):507-512.score: 21.0
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  40. Catherine A. Lock & Eileen F. S. Kaner (2000). Use of Marketing to Disseminate Brief Alcohol Intervention to General Practitioners: Promoting Health Care Interventions to Health Promoters. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (4):345-357.score: 21.0
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  41. Philippe Maubant (2013). Intervention et pratique éducative : Reflet et/ou révélateur des tensions entre instruction, socialisation et qualification ? Phronesis 2 (2-3):1-3.score: 21.0
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  42. Yuan Shen (2007). « Intervention forte » et « intervention faible » : deux voies d'intervention sociologique. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 1 (1):73-104.score: 21.0
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  43. Richard Byng & Roger Jones (2004). Mental Health Link: The Development and Formative Evaluation of a Complex Intervention to Improve Shared Care for Patients with Long‐Term Mental Illness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):27-36.score: 21.0
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  44. Sophie Doyon, Mélissa Perreault, Christopher Marquis, Josianne Gauthier, Denis Lebel, Benoit Bailey, Johanne Collin & Jean‐François Bussières (2009). Quantitative Evaluation of a Clinical Intervention Aimed at Changing Prescriber Behaviour in Response to New Guidelines. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):1111-1117.score: 21.0
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  45. Judith H. M. Helmink, Stef P. J. Kremers, Leonieke C. van Boekel, Femke N. van Brussel‐Visser & Nanne K. de Vries (2012). Factors Determining the Motivation of Primary Health Care Professionals to Implement and Continue the 'Beweegkuur' Lifestyle Intervention Programme. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):682-688.score: 21.0
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  46. Beth H. Jones & M. Tawfik Jelassi (1990). The Effect of Computer Intervention and Task Structure on Bargaining Outcome. Theory and Decision 28 (3):355-374.score: 21.0
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  47. Helen McConachie & Tim Diggle (2007). Parent Implemented Early Intervention for Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):120-129.score: 21.0
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  48. Christopher Shlels, Allen Hutchlnson, Martin Eccles, Eric Gardiner & Lada Smoljanovlc (1996). Accuracy and Reliability of Assessment of Severity of Illness Before and After an Educational Intervention. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2 (4):265-271.score: 21.0
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  49. Mariângela Freitas da Silveira & Iná Silva dos Santos (2006). Impact of an Educational Intervention to Promote Condom Use Among the Male Partners of HIV Positive Women. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (1):102-111.score: 21.0
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  50. Alex J. Bellamy (2005). Responsibility to Protect or Trojan Horse? The Crisis in Darfur and Humanitarian Intervention After Iraq. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (2):31–54.score: 18.0
    What does the world's engagement with the unfolding crisis in Darfur tell us about the impact of the Iraq war on the norm of humanitarian intervention? Is a global consensus about a "responsibility to protect" more or less likely? There are at least three potential answers to these questions. Some argue that the merging of strategic interests and humanitarian goods amplified by the intervention in Afghanistan makes it more likely that the world's most powerful states will act to (...)
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