Search results for 'Introduction' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jon Baldwin (2010). Introduction - White Magic: Baudrillard and Cinema. Film-Philosophy 14 (2):1-5.score: 24.0
    An introduction to the special issue on Baudrillard with an overview of the articles included.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kevin J. Harrelson (2012). Narrative Pedagogy for Introduction to Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):113-141.score: 21.0
    This essay offers a rationale for the employment of narrative pedagogies in introductory philosophy courses, as well as examples of narrative techniques, assignments, and course design that have been successfully employed in the investigation of philosophical topics. My hope is to undercut the sense that “telling stories in class” is just a playful diversion from the real material, and to encourage instructors to treat storytelling as a genuine philosophical activity that should be rigorously developed. I argue that introductory courses focused (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Isaac Record (2010). Scientific Instruments: Knowledge, Practice, and Culture [Editor's Introduction]. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):1-7.score: 21.0
    To one side of the wide third-floor hallway of Victoria College, just outside the offices of the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, lies the massive carcass of a 1960s-era electron microscope. Its burnished steel carapace has lost its gleam, but the instrument is still impressive for its bulk and spare design: binocular viewing glasses, beam control panel, specimen tray, and a broad work surface. Edges are worn, desiccated tape still feebly holds instructive reminders near control (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. Wondrusch & C. Schuster-Amft (2013). A Standardized Motor Imagery Introduction Program (MIIP) for Neuro-Rehabilitation: Development and Evaluation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  5. Florian Cova (ed.) (2011). Qu'en Pensez-Vous ? Introduction à la Philosophie Expérimentale. Germina.score: 21.0
    À quoi les philosophes sont-ils bons ? Faire de la philosophie rend-il meilleur ? Les jugements esthétiques gardent-ils encore quelque secret, ou bien Kant a-t-il tout dit sur la question ? La culture et le statut socio-économique de votre professeur de philosophie a-t-il une influence sur ses options philosophiques ? Pourquoi avons-nous l'impression que la pensée ne saurait être un état de notre cerveau ? Que nous ne serions pas libres si nous n'étions qu'un tas de neurone ? C'est pour (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Charls Pearson (2008). Introduction to the Special Issue on Peircean Semeiotic. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (3):201-208.score: 21.0
    This special issue should go a long way towards increasing the understanding of Peirce’s semeiotic and its applicability for solving problems in legal studies. In fact, the New Science of Semiotics should result in developing a rigorous and systematic methodology for legal studies making it a true semiotic science which I suggest calling “jurisology.”.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jonathan Westphal (1998). Philosophical Propositions: An Introduction to Philosophy. Routledge.score: 20.0
    Philosophical Propositions provides a fresh and lucid introduction to key philosophical problems in a classic style. Designed for students coming to philosophy for the first time, Jonathan Westphal introduces readers to the key problems in philosophy, encouraging them to work through those problems themselves. Each chapter considers a key philosophical problem: The Nature of a Philosophical Problem; Basic Concepts of Logic and Philosophy; The Problem of Evil; The Existence of God; Reality; Certainty; Time; Personal Identity; The Mind-Body Problem; Freewill (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jenny Teichman & Graham White (eds.) (1995). An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.score: 20.0
    An Introduction to Modern European Philosophy , contains scholarly but accessible essays by nine British academics on Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Maritain, Hannah Arendt, Habermas, Foucault, and the 'Events' of 1968. Written for English-speaking readers, it describes the varied traditions within 19th- and 20th-century European philosophy, reflecting the dynamism and plurality within the European tradition and presenting opposing points of view. It deals with both French and German philosophers, plus Kierkegaard, and is (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christoph Hoerl (2001). Introduction: Understanding, Explaining, and Intersubjectivity in Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):83-88.score: 18.0
    This article provides an introduction to a special issue of the journal Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology, On Understanding and Explaining Schizophrenia. The article identifies a common thread running through the different contributions to this special issue, inspired by Jaspers's (1963) suggestion that a profound impairment in the ability to engage in interpersonal and social relations is a key factor in psychiatric disorders. It is argued that this suggestion can help solve a central dilemma in psychopathology, which is to make (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Kane (2005). A Contemporary Introduction to Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Accessible to students with no background in the subject, A Contemporary Introduction to Free Will provides an extensive and up-to-date overview of all the latest views on this central problem of philosophy. Opening with a concise introduction to the history of the problem of free will--and its place in the history of philosophy--the book then turns to contemporary debates and theories about free will, determinism, and related subjects like moral responsibility, coercion, compulsion, autonomy, agency, rationality, freedom, and more. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). Introduction to 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics'. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 1-7.score: 18.0
    Introduction to my 'Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics' volume.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jonathan Dancy (1985/1986). An Introduction to Contemporary Epistemology. B. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    Introduction As its title indicates, this book is intended to provide an introduction to the main topics currently discussed under the rather unclear ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. D. A. Cruse (2004). Meaning in Language: An Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    A comprehensive introduction to the ways in which meaning is conveyed in language. Alan Cruse covers semantic matters, but also deals with topics that are usually considered to fall under pragmatics. A major aim is to highlight the richness and subtlety of meaning phenomena, rather than to expound any particular theory. Rich in examples and exercises, Meaning in Language provides an invaluable descriptive approach to this area of linguistics for undergraduates and postgraduates alike.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Anthony F. Beavers (2009). The Phenomenological Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):533-537.score: 18.0
    The Phenomenological Mind, by Shaun Gallagher and Dan Zahavi, is part of a recent initiative to show that phenomenology, classically conceived as the tradition inaugurated by Edmund Husserl and not as mere introspection, contributes something important to cognitive science. (For other examples, see “References” below.) Phenomenology, of course, has been a part of cognitive science for a long time. It implicitly informs the works of Andy Clark (e.g. 1997) and John Haugeland (e.g. 1998), and Hubert Dreyfus explicitly uses it (e.g. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2003). Theory and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    How does science work? Does it tell us what the world is "really" like? What makes it different from other ways of understanding the universe? In Theory and Reality , Peter Godfrey-Smith addresses these questions by taking the reader on a grand tour of one hundred years of debate about science. The result is a completely accessible introduction to the main themes of the philosophy of science. Intended for undergraduates and general readers with no prior background in philosophy, Theory (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.score: 18.0
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ruth Chang (ed.) (1997). Introduction, Incommensurability, Incomparability, and Practical Reasoning. Harvard University Press.score: 18.0
    This paper is the introduction to the volume. It gives an argumentative view of the philosophical landscape concerning incommensurability and incomparability. It argues that incomparability, not incommensurability, is the important phenomenon on which philosophers should be focusing and that the arguments for the existence of incomparability are so far not compelling.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. John R. Searle (2004). Mind: A Brief Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    "The philosophy of mind is unique among contemporary philosophical subjects," writes John Searle, "in that all of the most famous and influential theories are false." In Mind, Searle dismantles these famous and influential theories as he presents a vividly written, comprehensive introduction to the mind. Here readers will find one of the world's most eminent thinkers shedding light on the central concern of modern philosophy. Searle begins with a look at the twelve problems of philosophy of mind--which he calls (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Pamela Abbott (2005). An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This third edition of the bestselling An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions to key areas of sociological concern. This completely revised edition includes: · new chapters on sexuality and the media · additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body · many new international and comparative examples · the influence of theories of globalization and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Simon Blackburn (1999). Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Here at last is a coherent, unintimidating introduction to the challenging and fascinating landscape of Western philosophy. Written expressly for "anyone who believes there are big questions out there, but does not know how to approach them," Think provides a sound framework for exploring the most basic themes of philosophy, and for understanding how major philosophers have tackled the questions that have pressed themselves most forcefully on human consciousness. Simon Blackburn, author of the best-selling Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, begins (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ben Highmore (2002). Everyday Life and Cultural Theory: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Everyday Life and Cultural Theory provides a unique critical and historical introduction to theories of everyday life. Ben Highmore traces the development of conceptions of everyday life, from the Mass Observation project of the 1930s to contemporary theorists. Individual chapters examine: * Theories of the everyday * Fragments of everyday life * Surrealism: the marvelous in the everyday * Walter Benjamin's Trash Aesthetics * Mass Observation: the science of everyday life * Henri Lefebvre's Dialectics of Everyday Life * Michel (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Carr (2003). Making Sense of Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy and Theory of Education and Teaching. Routledgefalmer.score: 18.0
    Making Sense of Education provides a contemporary introduction to the key issues in educational philosophy and theory. Exploring recent developments as well as important ideas from the twentieth century, this book aims to make philosophy of education relevant to everyday practice for teachers and student teachers, as well as those studying education as an academic subject.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Introduction. In Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith (eds.), Global Justice. Ashgate.score: 18.0
    This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. The volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Simon Kirchin (2007). Moral Particularism: An Introduction. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (1):8-15.score: 18.0
    Moral particularism is a contentious position at present and seems likely to be so for the foreseeable future. In this Introduction, I outline and detail its essential claim, which I take to be, roughly, that what can be a reason that helps to make one action right need not be a reason that always helps to make actions right. This claim challenges a central assumption on which most, if not all, normative ethical theories are supposedly based. We owe this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. P. B. Andrews (2002). An Introduction to Mathematical Logic and Type Theory: To Truth Through Proof. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 18.0
    This introduction to mathematical logic starts with propositional calculus and first-order logic. Topics covered include syntax, semantics, soundness, completeness, independence, normal forms, vertical paths through negation normal formulas, compactness, Smullyan's Unifying Principle, natural deduction, cut-elimination, semantic tableaux, Skolemization, Herbrand's Theorem, unification, duality, interpolation, and definability. The last three chapters of the book provide an introduction to type theory (higher-order logic). It is shown how various mathematical concepts can be formalized in this very expressive formal language. This expressive notation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 18.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and attends to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Michael Pakaluk (2005). Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This is an engaging and accessible introduction to the 'Nicomachean Ethics', Aristotle's great masterpiece of moral philosophy. Michael Pakaluk offers a thorough and lucid examination of the entire work, uncovering Aristotle's motivations and basic views while paying careful attention to his arguments. The chapter on friendship captures Aristotle's doctrine with clarity and insight, and Pakaluk gives original and compelling interpretations of the Function Argument, the Doctrine of the Mean, courage and other character virtues, Akrasia, and the two treatments of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. Philip Wogaman (2009). Moral Dilemmas: An Introduction to Christian Ethics. Westminster John Knox Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction -- Part I: Starting points -- Some decisions are easier than others -- Easy decisions -- More difficult decisions -- Moral dilemmas -- The deep basis of the moral life -- Practical decision making -- Why ethics is ultimately religious -- Acceptable and unacceptable forms of revelation -- The useful incomplete ness of religious tradition -- Moral virtue and character -- Intuition and deliberation in moral decision-making -- The absolute and the relative in moral life -- Have we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kazuo Tanaka (1997). An Introduction to Fuzzy Logic for Practical Applications. Springer.score: 18.0
    Fuzzy logic has become an important tool for a number of different applications ranging from the control of engineering systems to artificial intelligence. In this concise introduction, the author presents a succinct guide to the basic ideas of fuzzy logic, fuzzy sets, fuzzy relations, and fuzzy reasoning, and shows how they may be applied. The book culminates in a chapter which describes fuzzy logic control: the design of intelligent control systems using fuzzy if-then rules which make use of human (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Markus Schrenk (2010). Mauro Dorato * The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (E-Version) 62 (1):225-232.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Mauro Dorato's book "The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature".
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman, Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics: Volume 2 of the North-Holland Series, the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science.score: 18.0
    This is the editors' introduction to a new anthology of commissioned articles covering the various branches of philosophy of physics. We introduce the articles in terms of the three pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory and thermal physics. We end by discussing the present state, and future prospects, of fundamental physics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (2007). Introduction: Modularity and the Nature of Emotions. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (5S).score: 18.0
    In this introduction, we give a brief overview of the main concepts of modularity that have been offered in recent literature. After this, we turn to a summary of the papers collected in this volume. Our primary aim is to explain how the modularity of emotion question relates to traditional debates in emotion theory.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert H. Jackson (2007). Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This highly successful textbook provides a systematic introduction to the principal theories of international relations. Combining incisive and original analyses with a clear and accessible writing style, it is ideal for introductory courses in international relations or international relations theory. Introduction to International Relations, Third Edition, focuses on the main theoretical traditions--realism, liberalism, international society, and theories of international political economy. The authors carefully explain how particular theories organize and sharpen our view of the world. They integrate excellent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Michael Morris (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In this textbook, Michael Morris offers a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ilham Dilman (1999). Free Will: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The debate between free will and its opposing doctrine, determinism, is one of the key issues in philosophy. Ilham Dilman brings together all the dimensions of the problem of free will with examples from literature, ethics and psychoanalysis, and draws out valuable insights from both sides of the freedom-determinism divide. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to this highly important question and examines the contributions made by sixteen of the most outstanding thinkers from the time of early Greece to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. William Fish (2010). Philosophy of Perception: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Three key principles -- Sense datum theories -- Adverbial theories -- Belief acquisition theories -- Intentional theories -- Disjunctive theories -- Perception and causation -- Perception and the sciences of the mind -- Perception and other sense modalities.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Martin Peterson (2009). An Introduction to Decision Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This up-to-date introduction to decision theory offers comprehensive and accessible discussions of decision-making under ignorance and risk, the foundations of utility theory, the debate over subjective and objective probability, Bayesianism, causal decision theory, game theory, and social choice theory. No mathematical skills are assumed, and all concepts and results are explained in non-technical and intuitive as well as more formal ways. There are over 100 exercises with solutions, and a glossary of key terms and concepts. An emphasis on foundational (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Robert Stam (2000). Film Theory: An Introduction. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    This book is a lively and provoking introduction to film theory.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. William J. Prior (1991). Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics. Routledge.score: 18.0
    INTRODUCTION: VIRTUE, KNOWLEDGE, AND HAPPINESS When we think about ethics, we are apt to think about right and wrong, morality and immorality, and universal ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Robert Brandom (2000). Articulating Reasons: An Introduction to Inferentialism. Harvard University Press.score: 18.0
    This new work provides an approachable introduction to the complex system that Making It Explicit mapped out.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. William E. Seager (1999). Theories of Consciousness: An Introduction and Assessment. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Theories of Consciousness provides an introduction to a variety of approaches to consciousness, questions the nature of consciousness, and contributes to current debates about whether a scientific understanding of consciousness is possible. While discussing key figures including Descartes, Fodor, Dennett and Chalmers, the book incorporates identity theories, representational theories, intentionality, externalism and new information-based theories.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Lyons (1995). Linguistic Semantics: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Linguistic Semantics: An Introduction is the successor to Sir John Lyons's important textbook Language, Meaning and Context (1981).While preserving the general structure of the earlier book, the author has substantially expanded its scope to introduce several topics that were not previously discussed, and to take account of new developments in linguistic semantics over the past decade. The resulting work is an invaluable guide to the subject, offering clarifications of its specialised terms and explaining its relationship to formal and philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Terry Eagleton (2008). The Meaning of Life: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    The phrase "the meaning of life" for many seems a quaint notion fit for satirical mauling by Monty Python or Douglas Adams. But in this spirited Very Short Introduction, famed critic Terry Eagleton takes a serious if often amusing look at the question and offers his own surprising answer. Eagleton first examines how centuries of thinkers and writers--from Marx and Schopenhauer to Shakespeare, Sartre, and Beckett--have responded to the ultimate question of meaning. He suggests, however, that it is only (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. JeeLoo Liu (2006). An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Philosophy to Chinese Buddhism. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy unlocks the mystery of ancient Chinese philosophy and unravels the complexity of Chinese Buddhism by placing them in the contemporary context of discourse. Elucidates the central issues and debates in Chinese philosophy, its different schools of thought, and its major philosophers. Covers eight major philosophers in the ancient period, among them Confucius, Laozi, and Zhuangzi. Illuminates the links between different schools of philosophy. Opens the door to further study of the relationship between Chinese and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Julia Annas (1981). An Introduction to Plato's Republic. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This interpretive introduction provides unique insight into Plato's Republic. Stressing Plato's desire to stimulate philosophical thinking in his readers, Julia Annas here demonstrates the coherence of his main moral argument on the nature of justice, and expounds related concepts of education, human motivation, knowledge and understanding. In a clear systematic fashion, this book shows that modern moral philosophy still has much to learn from Plato's attempt to move the focus from questions of what acts the just person ought to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brian Bruya (2010). Introduction: Toward a Theory of Attention That Includes Effortless Attention. In , Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.score: 18.0
    In this Introduction, I identify seven discrete aspects of attention brought to the fore by by considering the phenomenon of effortless attention: effort, decision-making, action syntax, agency, automaticity, expertise, and mental training. For each, I provide an overview of recent research, identify challenges to or gaps in current attention theory with respect to it, consider how attention theory can be advanced by including current research, and explain how relevant chapters of this volume offer such advances.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Hospers (1967). An Introduction to Philosophical Analysis. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 18.0
    This book provides an in-depth, problem-oriented introduction to philosophical analysis using an extremely clear, readable approach.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. E. J. Lowe (2000). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In this book Jonathan Lowe offers a lucid and wide-ranging introduction to the philosophy of mind. Using a problem-centred approach designed to stimulate as well as instruct, he begins with a general examination of the mind-body problem and moves on to detailed examination of more specific philosophical issues concerning sensation, perception, thought and language, rationality, artificial intelligence, action, personal identity and self-knowledge. His discussion is notably broad in scope, and distinctive in giving equal attention to deep metaphysical questions concerning (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Colin Howson (1997). Logic with Trees: An Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Logic With Trees is a new and original introduction to modern formal logic. It contains discussions on philosophical issues such as truth, conditionals and modal logic, presenting the formal material with clarity, and preferring informal explanations and arguments to intimidatingly rigorous development. Worked examples and exercises guide beginners through the book, with answers to selected exercises enabling readers to check their progress. Logic With Trees equips students with: a complete and clear account of the truth-tree system for first order (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Carolyn Korsmeyer (2004). Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Feminist approaches to art are extremely influential and widely studied across a variety of disciplines, including art theory, cultural and visual studies, and philosophy. Gender and Aesthetics is an introduction to the major theories and thinkers within art and aesthetics from a philosophical perspective, carefully introducing and examining the role that gender plays in forming ideas about art. It is ideal for anyone coming to the topic for the first time. Organized thematically, the book introduces in clear language the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000