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  1. Ioannis D. Evrigenis & Mark Somos (2011). Wrestling with Machiavelli. History of European Ideas 37 (2):85-93.
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  2. Adam Schulman, Joseph Reisert, Kathryn Sensen, Eric S. Petrie, Alan Levine, Diana J. Schaub, David S. Fott, Travis D. Smith, Ioannis D. Evrigenis, James Read, Janet Dougherty, Andrew Sabl, Sharon Krause, Steven Lenzner, Ben Berger, Russell Muirhead & Mark Blitz (2009). The Arts of Rule: Essays in Honor of Harvey C. Mansfield. Lexington Books.
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  3. Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2008). Fear of Enemies and Collective Action. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the way in which the fear of enemies shapes political groups at their founding and helps to preserve them by consolidating them in times of crisis. It develops a theory of “negative association” that examines the dynamics captured by the maxim “The enemy of my enemy is my friend” and then traces its role in the history of political thought, demonstrating that the fear of external threats is an essential element of the formation and preservation of political (...)
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  4. Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2008). Hobbes's Clockwork : The State of Nature & Machiavelli's Return to the Beginnings of Cities. In Harvey Claflin Mansfield, Sharon R. Krause & Mary Ann McGrail (eds.), The Arts of Rule: Essays in Honor of Harvey Mansfield. Lexington Books.
  5. Ioannis D. Evrigenis (2005). The Psychology of Politics: The City-Soul in Plato's Republic. History of Political Thought 23 (4):49-59.
    Socrates’ analogy between the city and the soul in the Republic is a crucial part of the dialogue, since it forms the basis for the interlocutors’ definition of justice. Critics allege that there are structural inconsistencies between the city and the soul, and that even if they were somehow structurally analogous, they are nevertheless dif- ferent. Why, then, would one expect that justice in one would be enlightening for the discovery of justice in the other? This paper examines the passages (...)
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