Search results for 'Ira Brooks‐Walsh' (try it on Scholar)

998 found
Sort by:
  1. John G. Slater & Frederick Michael Walsh (eds.) (2008). A Hundred Years of Philosophy From the Slater & Walsh Collections: Exhibition and Catalogue. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Frederick Michael Walsh (ed.) (2004). Philosophy & Bibliophily: An Exhibition Introducing the Walsh Philosophy Collection: The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto, 26 January-30 April 2004. [REVIEW] University of Toronto.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. A. Walsh (1998). Walsh, V.-Rationality, Allocation, and Reproduction. Philosophical Books 39:271-272.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mary Walsh (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (2):232-234.score: 120.0
    Long recognized as one of the main branches of political science, political theory has in recent years burgeoned in many different directions. Close textual analysis of historical texts sits alongside more analytical work on the nature and normative grounds of political values. Continental and post-modern influences jostle with ones from economics, history, sociology, and the law. Feminist concerns with embodiment make us look at old problems in new ways, and challenges of new technologies open whole new vistas for political theory. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Erin Brooks (2003). The Dies Irae (" Day of Wrath") and the Totentanz (" Dance of Death"): Medieval Themes Revisited in 19™ Century Music and Culture. Inquiry 4.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ira Brooks‐Walsh & Edmund V. Sullivan (1973). The Relationship Between Moral Judgment, Causal Reasoning and General Reasoning. Journal of Moral Education 2 (2):131-136.score: 87.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Denis M. Walsh (2010). Not a Sure Thing: Fitness, Probability, and Causation. Philosophy of Science 77 (2):147-171.score: 60.0
    In evolutionary biology changes in population structure are explained by citing trait fitness distribution. I distinguish three interpretations of fitness explanations—the Two‐Factor Model, the Single‐Factor Model, and the Statistical Interpretation—and argue for the last of these. These interpretations differ in their degrees of causal commitment. The first two hold that trait fitness distribution causes population change. Trait fitness explanations, according to these interpretations, are causal explanations. The last maintains that trait fitness distribution correlates with population change but does not cause (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Rodney A. Brooks, How to Build Complete Creatures Rather Than Isolated Cognitive Simulators.score: 60.0
    Artificial Intelligence as a discipline has gotten bogged down in subproblems of intelligence. These subproblems are the result of applying reductionist methods to the goal of creating a complete artificial thinking mind. In Brooks (1987) 1 have argued that these methods will lead us to solving irrelevant problems; interesting as intellectual puzzles, but useless in the long run for creating an artificial being.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Sylvia Walsh (2008). Kierkegaard: Thinking Christianly in an Existential Mode. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Sylvia Walsh explores Kierkegaard's understanding of Christianity and the existential mode of thinking theologically appropriate to it in the context of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Colin M. Angle & Rodney A. Brooks, Small Planetary Rovers.score: 60.0
    We have previously built a small IKg ([Angle 89] and [Brooks 89]) six legged walking robot named Genghis. It was remarkably successful as a testbed to develop walking and learning algorithms. It encouraged us to build a more fully engineered robot with higher performance. We are building two copies of the robot, both 1.6Kg in mass. Their generic name is Attila. Attila has 24 actuators and over 150 sensors, all connected via a local network (the I2C bus) to 11 onboard (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Bill Walsh (2009). The Score Takes Care of Itself: My Philosophy of Leadership. Portfolio.score: 60.0
    The last lecture on leadership by the NFL's greatest coach: Bill Walsh Bill Walsh is a towering figure in the history of the NFL.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. George V. Walsh (2000). Ayn Rand and the Metaphysics of Kant. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 2 (1):69 - 103.score: 60.0
    George V. Walsh examines the differences and similarities between Immanuel Kant and Ayn Rand in the area of metaphysics. He presents Kant's premises and conclusions on the major issues and provides a detailed discussion of Rand's criticisms of Kant. Walsh argues that Rand has seriously misread Kant on several points. Her interpretation—that Kant saw our sensory grasp of the world as "delusion," rather than knowledge—resembles that of Arthur Schopenhauer, except that the latter declares Kant's doctrine worthy of praise instead of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Sylvia Walsh (2005). Living Christianly: Kierkegaard's Dialectic of Christian Existence. Penn State University Press.score: 60.0
    In this book Sylvia Walsh focuses on the writings of this later period and locates the key to Kierkegaard's understanding of Christianity in the "inverse dialectic" that is involved in "living Christianly.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David Walsh (2008). The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    The Modern Philosophical Revolution breaks new ground by demonstrating the continuity of European philosophy from Kant to Derrida. Much of the literature on European philosophy has emphasized the breaks that have occurred in the course of two centuries of thinking. But as David Walsh argues, such a reading overlooks the extent to which Kant, Hegel, and Schelling were already engaged in the turn toward existence as the only viable mode of philosophizing. Where many similar studies summarize individual thinkers, this book (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ann Brooks (1997). Postfeminisms: Feminism, Cultural Theory, and Cultural Forms. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Once seen as synonymous with "anti-feminism" postfeminism is now understood as the theoretical meeting ground between feminism and anti-foundationalist movements such as postmodernism, post-structuralism and post-colonialsm. In this clear exposition of some of the major debates, theorists and practitioners, Ann Brooks shows how feminism is being redefined for the twenty first century. Individual chapters look at postfeminism in relation to feminist epistemology, Foucault, psychoanalytic theory and semiology, postmodernism and postcolonialism, cultural politics, popular culture, film and media, and sexuality and identity. (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Stanislas Dehaene, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh (2009). The Case for a Notation-Independent Representation of Number. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3):333.score: 60.0
    Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) neglect the solid empirical evidence for a convergence of notation-specific representations onto a shared representation of numerical magnitude. Subliminal priming reveals cross-notation and cross-modality effects, contrary to CK&W's prediction that automatic activation is modality and notation-specific. Notation effects may, however, emerge in the precision, speed, automaticity, and means by which the central magnitude representation is accessed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Miriam Rosenberg-Lee, Jessica M. Tsang, Vinod Menon, Roi Cohen Kadosh & Vincent Walsh (2009). Symbolic, Numeric, and Magnitude Representations in the Parietal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3):350.score: 60.0
    We concur with Cohen Kadosh & Walsh (CK&W) that representation of numbers in the parietal cortex is format dependent. In addition, we suggest that all formats do not automatically, and equally, access analog magnitude representation in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Understanding how development, learning, and context lead to differential access of analog magnitude representation is a key question for future research.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thom Brooks (2007). Between Natural Law and Legal Positivism: Dworkin and Hegel on Legal Theory. Georgia State University Law Review 23 (3):513-60.score: 30.0
    In this article, I argue that - despite the absence of any clear influence of one theory on the other - the legal theories of Dworkin and Hegel share several similar and, at times, unique positions that join them together within a distinctive school of legal theory, sharing a middle position between natural law and legal positivism. In addition, each theory can help the other in addressing certain internal difficulties. By recognizing both Hegel and Dworkin as proponents of a position (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thom Brooks (2004). Retributivist Arguments Against Capital Punishment. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):188–197.score: 30.0
    This article argues that even if we grant that murderers may deserve death in principle, retributivists should still oppose capital punishment. The reason? Our inability to know with certainty whether or not individuals possess the necessary level of desert. In large part due to advances in science, we can only be sure that no matter how well the trial is administered or how many appeals are allowed or how many years we let elapse, we will continue to execute innocent persons (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Rodney Brooks (1991). Intelligence Without Representation. Artificial Intelligence 47:139-159.score: 30.0
    Artificial intelligence research has foundered on the issue of representation. When intelligence is approached in an incremental manner, with strict reliance on interfacing to the real world through perception and action, reliance on representation disappears. In this paper we outline our approach to incrementally building complete intelligent Creatures. The fundamental decomposition of the intelligent system is not into independent information processing units which must interface with each other via representations. Instead, the intelligent system is decomposed into independent and parallel activity (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thom Brooks (2009). The Problem with Polygamy. Philosophical Topics 37 (2):109-22.score: 30.0
    Polygamy is a hotly contested practice and open to widespread misunderstandings. This practice is defined as a relationship between either one husband and multiple wives or one wife and multiple husbands. Today, 'polygamy' almost exclusively takes the form of one husband with multiple wives. In this article, my focus will centre on limited defences of polygamy offered recently by Chesire Calhoun and Martha Nussbaum. I will argue that these defences are unconvincing. The problem with polygamy is primarily that it is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thom Brooks, Climate Change and Negative Duties.score: 30.0
    It is widely accepted by the scientific community and beyond that human beings are primarily responsible for climate change and that climate change has brought with it a number of real problems. These problems include, but are not limited to, greater threats to coastal communities, greater risk of famine, and greater risk that tropical diseases may spread to new territory. In keeping with J. S. Mill's 'Harm Principle', green political theorists often respond that if we are contributing a harm to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (02):206-.score: 30.0
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory of punishment. By assuming a potential (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Thom Brooks (2007). Punishing States That Cause Global Poverty. William Mitchell Law Review 33 (2):519-32.score: 30.0
    The problem of global poverty has reached terrifying proportions. Since the end of the Cold War, ordinary deaths from starvation and preventable diseases amount to approximately 250 million people, most of them children. Thomas Pogge argues that wealthy states have a responsibility to help those in severe poverty. This responsibility arises from the foreseeable and avoidable harm the current global institutional order has perpetrated on poor states. Pogge demands that wealthy states eradicate global poverty not merely because they have the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Brooks (2000). How to Solve the Hard Problem: A Predictable Inexplicability. Psyche 6 (4):5-20.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Hilary Putnam & Vivian Walsh (2007). A Response to Dasgupta. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):359-364.score: 30.0
    The present note will be concerned only with Sir Partha Dasgupta's recent article in this journal (Dasgupta 2005). What is more, it will concentrate on those parts of the article which contain a serious misreading of Hilary Putnam's position on the entanglement of facts, theories and values. These philosophical matters can perhaps be clarified for economist readers (they should require no clarification for philosophers) by considering, to begin with, Dasgupta's interpretation of the Bergson–Samuelson position. What (Bergson) Burk (1938) and Samuelson (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Thom Brooks (2007). Equality and Democracy. Ethical Perspectives 14 (1):3-12.score: 30.0
    In a recent article, Thomas Christiano defends the intrinsic justice of democracy grounded in the principle of equal consideration of interests. Each citizen is entitled to a single vote, equal in weight to all other citizens. The problem with this picture is that all citizens must meet a threshold of minimal competence. My argument is that Christiano is wrong to claim a minimum threshold of competency is fully consistent with the principle of equality. While standards of minimal competency may be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Denis M. Walsh (2006). Evolutionary Essentialism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):425-448.score: 30.0
    According to Aristotelian essentialism, the nature of an organism is constituted of a particular goal-directed disposition to produce an organism typical of its kind. This paper argues—against the prevailing orthodoxy—that essentialism of this sort is indispensable to evolutionary biology. The most powerful anti-essentialist arguments purport to show that the natures of organisms play no explanatory role in modern synthesis biology. I argue that recent evolutionary developmental biology provides compelling evidence to the contrary. Developmental biology shows that one must appeal to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thom Brooks (2006). Plato, Hegel, and Democracy. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 53:24-50.score: 30.0
    Nearly every major philosophy, from Plato to Hegel and beyond, has argued that democracy is an inferior form of government, at best. Yet, virtually every contemporary political philosophy working today - whether in an analytic or postmodern tradition - endorses democracy in one variety or another. Should we conclude then that the traditional canon is meaningless for helping us theorize about a just state? In this paper, I will take up the criticisms and positive proposals of two such canonical figures (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Denis M. Walsh, Andre Ariew & Tim Lewens (2002). The Trials of Life: Natural Selection and Random Drift. Philosophy of Science 69 (3):452-473.score: 30.0
    We distinguish dynamical and statistical interpretations of evolutionary theory. We argue that only the statistical interpretation preserves the presumed relation between natural selection and drift. On these grounds we claim that the dynamical conception of evolutionary theory as a theory of forces is mistaken. Selection and drift are not forces. Nor do selection and drift explanations appeal to the (sub-population-level) causes of population level change. Instead they explain by appeal to the statistical structure of populations. We briefly discuss the implications (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Roger Walsh (2005). Can Synaesthesia Be Cultivated?: Indications From Surveys of Meditators. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):5-17.score: 30.0
    Synaesthesia is considered a rare perceptual capacity, and one that is not capable of cultivation. However, meditators report the experience quite commonly, and in questionnaire surveys, respondents claimed to experience synaesthesia in 35% of meditation retreatants, in 63% of a group of regular meditators, and in 86% of advanced teachers. These rates were significantly higher than in nonmeditator controls, and displayed significant correlations with measures of amount of meditation experience. A review of ancient texts found reports suggestive of synaesthesia in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Thom Brooks (2009). A Critique of Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 50-54.score: 30.0
    This paper offers two potential worries in Robert B. Talisse's A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. The first worry is that is that the picture of democracy on offer is incomplete. While Talisse correctly argues that democracy is about more than elections, democracy is also about more than deliberation between citizens. Talisse's deliberative democracy is problematic to the degree its view of deliberation fails to account for democracy. The second worry we may have concerns the relationship between Talisse's Peircean pragmatism and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. D. M. Brooks, The Necessity of Atheism.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thom Brooks, Publishing Advice for Graduate Students.score: 30.0
    Graduate students often lack concrete advice on publishing. This essay is an attempt to fill this important gap. Advice is given on how to publish everything from book reviews to articles, replies to book chapters, and how to secure both edited book contracts and authored monograph contracts, along with plenty of helpful tips and advice on the publishing world (and how it works) along the way in what is meant to be a comprehensive, concrete guide to publishing that should be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Denis M. Walsh (2007). The Pomp of Superfluous Causes: The Interpretation of Evolutionary Theory. Philosophy of Science 74 (3):281-303.score: 30.0
    There are two competing interpretations of the modern synthesis theory of evolution: the dynamical (also know as ‘traditional’) and the statistical. The dynamical interpretation maintains that explanations offered under the auspices of the modern synthesis theory articulate the causes of evolution. It interprets selection and drift as causes of population change. The statistical interpretation holds that modern synthesis explanations merely cite the statistical structure of populations. This paper offers a defense of statisticalism. It argues that a change in trait frequencies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. J. A. Burgess & Adrian Walsh (1998). Is Genetic Engineering Wrong, Per Se? Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (3):393-406.score: 30.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Adrian Walsh (2011). A Moderate Defence of the Use of Thought Experiments in Applied Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):467-481.score: 30.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Thom Brooks, The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.score: 30.0
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities approach cannot justify polygamy in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thom Brooks (2005). Hegel's Ambiguous Contribution to Legal Theory. Res Publica 11 (1):85-94.score: 30.0
    Hegel's legacy is particularly controversial, not least in legal theory. He has been classified as a proponent of either natural law, legal positivism, the historical school, pre-Marxism, postmodern critical theory, and even transcendental legal theory. To what degree has Hegel actually influenced contemporary legal theorists? This review article looks at Michael Salter's collection Hegel and Law. I look at articles on civil disobedience, contract law, feminism, and punishment. I conclude noting similarities between Hegel's legal theory and that of Ronald Dworkin. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Arthur Hyman & James J. Walsh (eds.) (1973/1983). Philosophy in the Middle Ages: The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 30.0
    Introduction The editors of this volume hope that it will prove useful for the study of philosophy in the Middle Ages by virtue of the comprehensiveness of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. D. M. Walsh (1998). The Scope of Selection: Sober and Neander on What Natural Selection Explains. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (2):250 – 264.score: 30.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. D. H. M. Brooks (1985). Strawson, Hume, and the Unity of Consciousness. Mind 94 (October):583-86.score: 30.0
  43. Denis M. Walsh (2003). Fit and Diversity: Explaining Adaptive Evolution. Philosophy of Science 70 (2):280-301.score: 30.0
    According to a prominent view of evolutionary theory, natural selection and the processes of development compete for explanatory relevance. Natural selection theory explains the evolution of biological form insofar as it is adaptive. Development is relevant to the explanation of form only insofar as it constrains the adaptation-promoting effects of selection. I argue that this view of evolutionary theory is erroneous. I outline an alternative, according to which natural selection explains adaptive evolution by appeal to the statistical structure of populations, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. D. M. Walsh (1996). Fitness and Function. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):553-574.score: 30.0
    According to historical theories of biological function, a trait's function is determined by natural selection in the past. I argue that, in addition to historical functions, ahistorical functions ought to be recognized. I propose a theory of biological function which accommodates both. The function of a trait is the way it contributes to fitness and fitness can only be determined relative to a selective regime. Therefore, the function of a trait can only be specified relative to a selective regime. Apart (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Rodney A. Brooks, Artificial Life and Real Robots.score: 30.0
    The first part of this paper explores the general issues in using Artificial Life techniques to program actual mobile robots. In particular it explores the difficulties inherent in transferring programs evolved in a simulated environment to run on an actual robot. It examines the dual evolution of organism morphology and nervous systems in biology. It proposes techniques to capture some of the search space pruning that dual evolution offers in the domain of robot programming. It explores the relationship between robot (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Steve Clarke & Adrian Walsh (2009). Scientific Imperialism and the Proper Relations Between the Sciences. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):195 – 207.score: 30.0
    John Dupr argues that 'scientific imperialism' can result in 'misguided' science being considered acceptable. 'Misguided' is an explicitly normative term and the use of the pejorative 'imperialistic' is implicitly normative. However, Dupr has not justified the normative dimension of his critique. We identify two ways in which it might be justified. It might be justified if colonisation prevents a discipline from progressing in ways that it might otherwise progress. It might also be justified if colonisation prevents the expression of important (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Thom Brooks (2004). A Defence of Jury Nullification. Res Publica 10 (4):401-423.score: 30.0
    In both Great Britain and the United States there has been a growing debate about the modern acceptability of jury nullification. Properly understood, juries do not have any constitutional right to ignore the law, but they do have the power to do so nevertheless. Juries that nullify may be motivated by a variety of concerns: too harsh sentences, improper government action, racism, etc. In this article, I shall attempt to defend jury nullification on a number of grounds. First, I discuss (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thom Brooks (2005). Kantian Punishment and Retributivism: A Reply to Clark. Ratio 18 (2):237–245.score: 30.0
    In this journal, Michael Clark defends a "A Non-Retributive Kantian Approach to Punishment". I argue that both Kant's and Rawls's theories of punishment are retributivist to some extent. It may then be slightly misleading to say that by following the views of Kant and Rawls, in particular, as Clark does, we can develop a nonretributivist theory of punishment. This matter is further complicated by the fact Clark nowhere addresses Rawls's views on punishment: Rawls endorses a mixed theory combining retributive and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Thom Brooks (2001). Corlett on Kant, Hegel, and Retribution. Philosophy 76 (4):561-580.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this essay is to critically appraise J. Angelo Corlett's recent interpretation of Kant's theory of punishment as well as his rejection of Hegel's penology. In taking Kant to be a retributivist at a primary level and a proponent of deterrence at a secondary level, I believe Corlett has inappropriately wed together Kant's distinction between moral and positive law. Moreover, his support of Kant on these grounds is misguided as it is instead Hegel who holds such a distinction. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 998