Search results for 'Irking S. Sayer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Sayer (2009). Making Our Way Through the World: Human Reflexivity and Social Mobility by Margaret S. Archer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. 352 Pp. 978-0521696937 Paperback, £18.99. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 8 (1):113-123.score: 120.0
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  2. George Sayer (1991). Discussion of A. N. Wilson's Biography of Lewis. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):526-531.score: 120.0
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  3. Y. Sayer (1994). Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hegel's Dialectic. Five Hermeneutical Studies. Translated and with an Introduction by P. Christopher Smith. [REVIEW] Revue Philosophique de Louvain 92 (1):126-126.score: 120.0
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  4. Y. Sayer (1994). Joseph J. Kockelmans, On the Truth of Being: Reflections on Heidegger's Later Philosophy. Revue Philosophique de Louvain 92 (1):125-126.score: 120.0
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  5. Andrew Sayer (2009). Contributive Justice and Meaningful Work. Res Publica 15 (1):1-16.score: 60.0
    The dominant focus of thinking about economic justice is overwhelmingly distributive, that is, concerned with what people get in terms of resources and opportunities. It views work mainly negatively, as a burden or cost, or else is neutral about it, rather than seeing it as a source of meaning and fulfilment—a good in its own right. However, what we do in life has at least as much, if not more, influence on whom we become, as does what we get . (...)
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  6. Derek Sayer (2012). Crossed Wires on the Prague-Paris Surrealist Telephone. Common Knowledge 18 (2):193-207.score: 60.0
    An exercise in humour noir, this essay explores relations between the Paris and Prague surrealist groups from André Breton and Paul Éluard's visit to “the magic capital of old Europe” in 1935 to the aborted “Prague Spring” of 1968. It focuses on the famous “starry castle” of Breton's Mad Love — which Czechs know better as Letohrádek Hvězda at Bílá hora, the White Mountain — as a signifier whose wanderings, over the period, encapsulate the mutual myths and misunderstandings that were (...)
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  7. John Urry (1982). Science, Realism and the Social: A Discussion of Derek Sayer's Marx's Method: Ideology, Science and Critique in 'Capital'. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 12 (3):311-318.score: 36.0
  8. Bob Jessop (1991). Reviews : Derek Sayer, Capitalism and Modernity: An Excursus on Marx and Weber, London: Routledge, 1991, Paper £8.99, X + 172 Pp. Stjepan G. Meštrović, The Coming Fin de Siècle: An Application of Durkheim's Sociology to Modernity and Postmodernism, London: Routledge, 1991, £35.00, Xiv + 232 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):455-457.score: 36.0
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  9. J. M. Cameron (1991). "Owen Barfield on C. S. Lewis," by Owen Barfield; "And God Came In," by Lyle W. Dorsett; "G. K. Chesterton and C. S. Lewis: The Riddle of Joy," Edited by Michael H. Macdonald and Andrew A. Tadie; "Jack: C. S. Lewis and His Times," by George Sayer; "C. S. Lewis: The Authentic Voice," by William Griffin. [REVIEW] The Chesterton Review 17 (3):465-468.score: 36.0
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  10. Deboral Savage (2005). 8.1 Introduction to Dorothy L. Sayer's "Are Women Human?" From Unpopular Opinions: Twenty-One Essays. Logos 8 (4).score: 36.0
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  11. Chris Emlyn-Jones (2005). S. Sayers: Plato's Republic. An Introduction . Pp. V + 178. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999. Paper, £10.95. ISBN: 0-7486-1188-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):355-.score: 14.0
  12. G. Sher (1999). Beyond Neutrality (S. Sayers). Philosophical Books 40:133-134.score: 14.0
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  13. S. Sandford (forthcoming). Sean Sayers, Plato's Republic: An Introduction. Radical Philosophy.score: 13.0
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  14. Justin Cruickshank (2007). The Usefulness of Fallibilism in Post-Positivist Philosophy: A Popperian Critique of Critical Realism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (3):263-288.score: 12.0
    Sayer argues that Popper defended a logicist philosophy of science. The problem with such logicism is that it creates what is termed here as a `truncated foundationalism', which restricts epistemic certainty to the logical form of scientific theories whilst having nothing to say about their substantive contents. Against this it is argued that critical realism, which Sayer advocates, produces a linguistic version of truncated foundationalism and that Popper's problem-solving philosophy, with its emphasis on developing knowledge through criticism, eschews (...)
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  15. Clare Beghtol (2008). From the Universe of Knowledge to the Universe of Concepts: The Structural Revolution in Classification for Information Retrieval. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (2):131-144.score: 12.0
    During the twentieth century, bibliographic classification theory underwent a structural revolution. The first modern bibliographic classifications were top-down systems that started at the universe of knowledge and subdivided that universe downward to minute subclasses. After the invention of faceted classification by S.R. Ranganathan, the ideal was to build bottom-up classifications that started with the universe of concepts and built upward to larger and larger faceted classes. This ideal has not been achieved, and the two kinds of classification systems are not (...)
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  16. Paul Brazier (2007). Creed Without Chaos: Exploring Theology in the Writings of Dorothy L. Sayers. By Laura K. Simmonsthe C. S. Lewis Chronicles: The Indispensable Biography of the Creator of Narnia Full of Little-Known Facts, Events & Miscellany. By Colin Duriezperilous Realms: Celtic & Norse in Tolkien's Middle Earth. By Marjorie Burns. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (5):843–846.score: 12.0
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  17. J. Sayer Minas (1965). Comments on Richard C. Jeffrey's "Ethics and the Logic of Decision". Journal of Philosophy 62 (19):542-544.score: 12.0
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  18. N. Dent (2002). SAYERS, S.-Plato's Republic. An Introduction. Philosophical Books 43 (3):227-227.score: 12.0
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  19. J. Hughes (2000). SAYERS, S.-Marxism and Human Nature. Philosophical Books 41 (4):278-279.score: 12.0
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  20. Michael Marshall (1993). Dorothy L. Sayers's Anglican Inheritance. The Chesterton Review 19 (4):570-572.score: 12.0
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  21. E. J. Oliver (1993). Dorothy L. Sayers and Chesterton's Cloak. The Chesterton Review 19 (1):63-71.score: 12.0
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  22. Susan Haack (2008). After My Own Heart: Dorothy Sayers' Feminism. Think 7 (19):23-33.score: 7.0
    Dorothy Sayers' Gaudy Night, published in 1936, explores still-topical questions about the relation of epistemological and ethical values, and about the place of women in the life of the mind. In her wry reflections on the radical differences between today's feminist philosophy and Sayers' no-nonsense observation that Susan Haack draws both on this detective story and on Sayers' wonderfully brisk essay.
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  23. Gwen M. Sayers, Moses S. Kapembwa & Mary C. Green (2006). Advance Refusals: Does the Law Help? Clinical Ethics 1 (3):139-145.score: 5.0
    Advance refusals of life-sustaining treatment involve three potentially conflicting interests: those of the patient; those of the doctor; and those of the law. The state's interest in protecting life can clash with the patient's right to self determination which, in turn, can conflict with the doctor's desire to act in the patient's best interests. Against this background, we present the case of a patient who was treated (arguably) contrary to his advance refusal but in accordance with English law.
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  24. William Sayers (2009). Animal Vocalization and Human Polyglossia in Walter of Bibbesworth's Thirteenth-Century Domestic Treatise in Anglo-Norman French and Middle English. Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):525-541.score: 5.0
    Walter of Bibbesworth’s late thirteenth-century versified treatise on French vocabulary relevant to the management of estates in Britain has the first extensive list of animal vocalizations in a European vernacular. Many of the Anglo-Norman French names for animals and their sounds are glossed in Middle English, inviting both diachronic and synchronic views of the capacity of these languages for onomatopoetic formation and reflection on the interest of these social and linguistic communities in zoosemiotics.
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  25. F. C. S. Schiller (1939/1979). Our Human Truths. Ams Press.score: 5.0
    Burning questions.--The humanistic view of life.--Must empiricism be limited?--Truth-seekers and sooth-sayers.--Must pragmatists disagree?--Humanisms and humanism.--Has philosophy any message for the world?--Must philosophy be dull?--Is idealism incurably ambiguous?--The ultra-Gothic Kant.--Goethe and the Faustian way of salvation.--Plato's Phaedo and the ancient hope of immortality.--Plato's Republic.--How far does science need determinism?--The relativity of metaphysics.--Ethics, casuistry, and life.--Prophecy and destiny.--The crumbling British empire.--Can democracy survive?--The possibility of a United States of Europe.--Ant-men or super-men?--Fascisms and dictatorships.--Humanist logic and theory of knowledge.--Multi-valued logics - and others.--Data, (...)
     
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  26. Susan Haack (2008). Putting Philosophy to Work: Inquiry and its Place in Culture: Essays on Science, Religion, Law, Literature, and Life. Prometheus Books.score: 4.0
    Staying for an answer : the untidy process of groping for truth -- The same, only different -- The unity of truth and the plurality of truths -- Coherence, consistency, cogency, congruity, cohesiveness, &c. : remain calm! don't go overboard! -- Not cynicism, but synechism : lessons from classical pragmatism -- Science, economics, "vision" -- The integrity of science : what it means, why it matters -- Scientific secrecy and "spin" : the sad, sleazy story of the trials of remune (...)
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  27. Eugene Thacker (2012). Cosmic Pessimism. Continent 2 (2):66-75.score: 4.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 66–75 ~*~ We’re Doomed. Pessimism is the night-side of thought, a melodrama of the futility of the brain, a poetry written in the graveyard of philosophy. Pessimism is a lyrical failure of philosophical thinking, each attempt at clear and coherent thought, sullen and submerged in the hidden joy of its own futility. The closest pessimism comes to philosophical argument is the droll and laconic “We’ll never make it,” or simply: “We’re doomed.” Every effort doomed to failure, every (...)
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  28. Aristotle (2013). Poetics. Oup Oxford.score: 4.0
    A founding text of European aestheticism and literary criticism, Poetics underpins our moden understanding of imaginative writing. Anthony Kenny's new translation is accompanied by associated material from Plato, Sir Philip Sidney, P. B. Shelley, and Dorothy L. Sayers and a wide-ranging introduction.
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  29. Sean Sayers (2004). Review of Adriaan T. Peperzak, Modern Freedom: Hegel's Legal, Moral, and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 49:158-163.score: 4.0
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  30. Grace Teo-Dixon & Janet Sayers (2011). Wisdom as Knowledge Management's Perfect Solution. Philosophy of Management 10 (1):61-77.score: 4.0
    The management of “wisdom” has been mooted in knowledge management (KM) theory mostly in relation to what is known as the “knowledge hierarchy”. We argue that there are unquestioned assumptions inherent in KM leading to wisdom being included in KM theory because of rhetorical “urges” more than theoretical ones. These rhetorical urges impel a drive towards perfection that excludes more than is included. Our interrogation of the KM literature uncoverssome of the questionable implications in understanding knowledge as a resource and (...)
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  31. Jeremy Fernando (2011). On Love and Poetry. Or, Where Philosophers Fear to Tread. Continent 1 (1):27-32.score: 4.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 27-32. “My”—what does this word designate? Not what belongs to me, but what I belong to,what contains my whole being, which is mine insofar as I belong to it. Søren Kierkegaard. The Seducer’s Diary . I can’t sleep till I devour you / And I’ll love you, if you let me… Marilyn Manson “Devour” The role of poetry in the relationalities between people has a long history—from epic poetry recounting tales of yore; to emotive lyric poetry; to (...)
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  32. P. Wittgenstein Johnston, J. Locke, Human Being Avebury Series, M. Midgeley, S. Sayers, P. Osborne & D. Gramsci Schechter (forthcoming). MILL, JS On Liberty. Routledge. NYE, A. Feminist Theory and the Philosophies of Man. Rout-Ledge. OAKLEY, J. Morality and the Emo. [REVIEW] Cogito.score: 4.0
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  33. Valerie Monthland Preston-Dunlop & Lesley-Anne Sayers (eds.) (2010). The Dynamic Body in Space: Exploring and Developing Rudolf Laban's Ideas for the 21st Century. Dance Books.score: 4.0
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  34. S. Sayers (1990). Communism and Nationalism: Karl Marx Versus Friederich List Roman Szporluk (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), Ix + 307 Pp., £24.00. [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 12 (4):552-554.score: 4.0
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  35. S. Sayers (1985). Mental Illness as a Moral Concept: The Relevance of Freud. In Roy Edgley & Richard Osborne (eds.), Radical Philosophy Reader. Verso. 217--233.score: 4.0
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  36. Sean Sayers (1999). Plato's Republic: An Introduction. Edinburgh University Press.score: 4.0
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  37. Sean Sayers (1975). Review of K.T.Fann, The Making of the Human Being in the People's Republic of China. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy (10):32-34.score: 4.0
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  38. Sean Sayers (1975). Review of T.S. Szasz, Ideology and Insanity. [REVIEW] The Human Context 7 (2):356-9.score: 4.0
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  39. S. Sayers (1973). The Concept of Mental Illness'. Radical Philosophy 5:2-8.score: 4.0
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  40. Sean Sayers (2011). Virtue and Politics: Alasdair MacIntyre's Revolutionary Aristotelianism. In Paul Blackledge & Kelvin Knight (eds.). University of Notre Dame Press. 79-96.score: 4.0
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  41. Sean Sayers (2011). MacIntyre and Modernity. In Paul Blackledge & Kelvin Knight (eds.), Virtue and Politics: Alasdair Macintyre's Revolutionary Aristotelianism. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 3.0
    At a time when many professional philosophers in the English speaking world have all but given up the attempt to think critically and in large scale terms about the modern world, MacIntyre's work is defiantly untimely, and greatly welcome for that. It is remarkably wide ranging, comprehensive and thought provoking. He has been described as a `revolutionary Aristotelian', but this indicates only part of the picture. His work draws on ideas not only from Marx and Aristotle, but also from analytical (...)
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  42. Sean Sayers, The Concept of Alienation in Existentialism and Marxism Hegelian Themes in Modern Social Thought.score: 2.0
    The concept of alienation is one of the most important and fruitful legacies of Hegel's social philosophy. It is strange therefore that Hegel's own account is widely rejected, not least by writers in those traditions which have taken up and developed the concept in the most influential ways: Marxism and existentialism.
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  43. Sean Sayers (2003). Creative Activity and Alienation in Hegel and Marx. Historical Materialism 11 (1):107-128.score: 2.0
    For Marx, work is the fundamental and central activity in human life and, potentially at least, a ful lling and liberating activity. Although this view is implicit throughout Marx’s work, there is little explicit explanation or defence of it. The fullest treatment is in the account of ‘estranged labour’ [entfremdete Arbeit] in the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts;1 but, even there, Marx does not set out his philosophical assumptions at length. For an understanding of these, one must turn to Hegel. Marx (...)
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  44. Sean Sayers (2007). Individual and Society in Marx and Hegel: Beyond the Communitarian Critique of Liberalism. Science and Society 71 (1):84 - 102.score: 2.0
    Marx's concepts of individual and society have their roots in Hegel's philosophy. Like recent communitarian philosophers, both Marx and Hegel reject the idea that the individual is an atomic entity, an idea that runs through liberal social philosophy and classical economics. Human productive activity is essentially social. However, Marx shows that the liberal concepts of individuality and society are not simply philosophical errors; they are products and expressions of the social alienation of free market conditions. Marx's theory develops from Hegel's (...)
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  45. Sean Sayers (2007). The Concept of Labor: Marx and His Critics. Science and Society 71 (4):431 - 454.score: 2.0
    Marx conceives of labor as form-giving activity. This is criticized for presupposing a "productivist" model of labor which regards work that creates a material product — craft or industrial work — as the paradigm for all work (Habermas, Benton, Arendt). Many traditional kinds of work do not seem to fit this picture, and new "immaterial" forms of labor (computer work, service work, etc.) have developed in postindus trial society which, it is argued, necessitate a fundamental revision of Marx's approach (Hardt (...)
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  46. Sean Sayers (1984). Marxism and the Dialectical Method: A Critique of G.A. Cohen. Radical Philosophy (36):4-13.score: 2.0
    The dialectical method, Marx Insisted, was at the basis of his account of society. In 1858, in a letter to Engels, he wrote: In the method of treatment the fact that by mere accident I again glanced through Hegel's Logic has been of great service to me... If there should ever be the time for such work again, I would greatly like to make accessible to the ordinary human intelligence, in two or three printer's sheets, what is rational in the (...)
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  47. Sean Sayers, Dialectic in Western Marxism.score: 2.0
    The fundamental principles of modern dialectical philosophy derive from Hegel. He sums them up as follows. ‘Everything is inherently contradictory ... Contradiction is the root of all movement and vitality, it is only in so far as something has a contradiction within it that it moves, has an urge and activity' (Hegel 1969, 439). In Hegel's philosophy these ideas form part of an all−embracing idealist system which portrays all phenomena ×− both natural and social ×− as subject to dialectic. Marx (...)
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  48. Sean Sayers, Marxism and Human Nature: A Reply to Terry Eagleton.score: 2.0
    Something about my book, Marxism and Human Nature,1 seems to have provoked Eagleton's hostility and clouded his mind, but it is difficult to figure out what. All that is evident from his review is that he has not read the book carefully or taken the trouble to understand it properly.
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  49. Sean Sayers (2005). Why Work? Marx and Human Nature. Science and Society 69 (4):606 - 616.score: 2.0
    Why work? Most people say that they work only as a means to earn a living. This is also implied by the hedonist account of human nature which underlies utilitarianism and classical economics. It is argued in this paper that Marx’s concept of alienation involves a more satisfactory theory of human nature which is rooted in Hegel’s philosophy. According to this, we are productive beings and work is potentially a fulfilling activity. The fact that it is not experienced as such (...)
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