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Irving Block [15]Irving L. Block [4]
  1. Carlos Bazan, Rudiger Bittner, Irving Block, Luc Brisson, John Clendinnen, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Johnann Götschl, Ingemund Gullvag, Rom Harre & Bernard Harrison (forthcoming). Visiting Professors From Abroad, 1983-84. Social Research.
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  2. Irving L. Block (2008). Aristotle on the Common Sense. Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):235-249.
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  3. Irving Block (1992). Wittgenstein, Frege and the Vienna Circle. Philosophical Books 33 (2):65-71.
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  4. Irving L. Block (1992). Aristotle, The Power of Perception. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):120-121.
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  5. Irving L. Block (1988). Aristotle on the Common Sense: A Reply to Kahn and Others. Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):235-249.
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  6. Irving Block (1987). OK Bouwsma, Wittgenstein: Conversations I949-I951 Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (10):389-391.
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  7. Irving Block (1984). The Metaphysics of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Leonard Goddard and Brenda Judge Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Monograph 1 (June 1982) Melbourne, Australia: The Australasian Association of Philosophy, 1982. Pp. 72. $10.00 (A). [REVIEW] Dialogue 23 (02):361-364.
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  8. Ian McFetridge, Irving Block, John V. Canfield, Steven H. Holtzmann, Christopher M. Leich, Brian McGuinness, H. O. Mounce, Rush Rhees & George Henrik Von Wright (1984). Recent Work of WittgensteinPerspectives on the Philosophy of Wittgenstein.Wittgenstein: Language and World.Wittgenstein: To Follow a Rule.Wittgenstein and His Times.Wittgenstein's Tractatus: An Introduction.Ludwig Wittgenstein: Personal Recollections.Wittgenstein. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 34 (134):69.
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  9. Irving Block & Ludwig Wittgenstein (eds.) (1981). Perspectives on the Philosophy of Wittgenstein. Mit Press.
     
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  10. Irving Block (1978). Understanding Wittgenstein. Philosophia 7 (3-4):717-733.
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  11. Irving Block (1977). Aristotle's Man. Philosophical Books 18 (1):11-14.
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  12. Irving Block (1966). Aristotle's Categories and De Interpretatione. Tr. J. L. Ackrill, Oxford University Press, 1963. Pp. 162. Dialogue 5 (03):452-455.
  13. Irving L. Block (1965). On the Commonness of the Common Sensibles. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (August):189-195.
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  14. Irving Block (1964). Plato, Parmenides, Ryle and Exemplification. Mind 73 (291):417-422.
  15. Irving Block (1964). Three German Commentators on the Individual Senses and the Common Sense in Aristotle's Psychology. Phronesis 9 (1):58 - 63.
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  16. Irving Block (1964). Three German Commentators on the Individual Senses and the Common Sense in Aristotle's Psychology. Phronesis 9 (1):58-63.
  17. Irving Block (1963). The Desired and the Desirable in Dewey's Ethics. Dialogue 2 (02):170-181.
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  18. Irving Block (1961). Truth and Error in Aristotle's Theory of Sense Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 11 (42):1-9.
    Why does aristotle say that the common sensibles are susceptible to error while the specific sensibles are not? various solutions of this problem are discussed and finally it is concluded that aristotle's meaning here is teleological. The specific senses were fashioned by nature to perceive the specific sensibles but not the common sensibles and so error sometimes (often) creeps in. The common sense is really not a sense faculty as the eye, The ear etc.
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  19. Irving Block (1960). Aristotle and the Physical Object. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (1):93-101.
    HOW WE BECOME AWARE OF PHYSICAL OBJECTS OVER AND ABOVE THE PERCEPTUAL ACTS OF SEEING COLOR, SHAPES AND HEARING SOUNDS, ETC., IS A QUESTION THAT HAS OCCUPIED MANY CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHERS OF SENSE-PERCEPTION. DID ARISTOTLE EVER FACE THIS PROBLEM, AND IF HE DID, HOW DID HE DEAL WITH IT? THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES THIS QUESTION AND CONCLUDES THAT THE ANSWER TO IT CAN BE FOUND "DE INSOMNIAS" IN ARISTOTLE'S DISCUSSION OF DREAMS AND ILLUSIONS. THERE IS AN ACT AFFIRMATION ("PHESIN") CARRIED OUT BY (...)
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