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  1.  15
    Zoltán Dienes, Elizabeth Brown, Sam Hutton, Irving Kirsch, Giuliana Mazzoni & Daniel B. Wright (2009). Hypnotic Suggestibility, Cognitive Inhibition, and Dissociation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):837-847.
    We examined two potential correlates of hypnotic suggestibility: dissociation and cognitive inhibition. Dissociation is the foundation of two of the major theories of hypnosis and other theories commonly postulate that hypnotic responding is a result of attentional abilities . Participants were administered the Waterloo-Stanford Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C. Under the guise of an unrelated study, 180 of these participants also completed: a version of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that is normally distributed in non-clinical populations; a latent inhibition (...)
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  2.  2
    William J. McGeown, Annalena Venneri, Irving Kirsch, Luca Nocetti, Kathrine Roberts, Lisa Foan & Giuliana Mazzoni (2012). Suggested Visual Hallucination Without Hypnosis Enhances Activity in Visual Areas of the Brain. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):100-116.
    This functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study investigated high and low suggestible people responding to two visual hallucination suggestions with and without a hypnotic induction. Participants in the study were asked to see color while looking at a grey image, and to see shades of grey while looking at a color image. High suggestible participants reported successful alterations in color perception in both tasks, both in and out of hypnosis, and showed a small benefit if hypnosis was induced. Low suggestible people (...)
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  3.  12
    William J. McGeown, Giuliana Mazzoni, Annalena Venneri & Irving Kirsch (2009). Hypnotic Induction Decreases Anterior Default Mode Activity. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):848-855.
    The ‘default mode’ network refers to cortical areas that are active in the absence of goal-directed activity. In previous studies, decreased activity in the ‘default mode’ has always been associated with increased activation in task-relevant areas. We show that the induction of hypnosis can reduce anterior default mode activity during rest without increasing activity in other cortical regions. We assessed brain activation patterns of high and low suggestible people while resting in the fMRI scanner and while engaged in visual tasks, (...)
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  4.  6
    Giuliana Mazzoni, Elisabetta Rotriquenz, Claudia Carvalho, Manila Vannucci, Kathrine Roberts & Irving Kirsch (2009). Suggested Visual Hallucinations in and Out of Hypnosis. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):494-499.
    We administered suggestions to see a gray-scale pattern as colored and a colored pattern in shades of gray to 30 high suggestible and eight low suggestible students. The suggestions were administered twice, once following the induction of hypnosis and once without an induction. Besides rating the degree of color they saw in the stimuli differently, participants also rated their states of consciousness as normal, relaxed, hypnotized, or deeply hypnotized. Reports of being hypnotized were limited to highly suggestible participants and only (...)
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  5.  32
    Giuliana A. L. Mazzoni, Elizabeth F. Loftus & Irving Kirsch (2001). Changing Beliefs About Implausible Autobiographical Events: A Little Plausibility Goes a Long Way. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7 (1):51.
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  6.  4
    Irving Kirsch (2011). Suggestibility and Suggestive Modulation of the Stroop Effect. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):335-336.
    Although the induction of a hypnotic state does not seem necessary for suggestive modulation of the Stroop effect, this important phenomenon has seemed to be dependent on the subject’s level of hypnotic suggestibility. Raz and Campbell’s study indicates that suggestion can modulate the Stroop effect substantially in very low suggestible subjects, as well as in those who are highly suggestible. This finding casts doubt on the presumed mechanism by which suggestive modulation is brought about. Research aimed at uncovering the means (...)
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  7. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press 145-165.
     
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  8.  1
    Irving Kirsch (1987). How Thoughts Affect the Body: A Metatheoretical Framework. Journal of Mind and Behavior 8 (3).
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  9.  14
    Irving Kirsch (1997). Hypnotic Responding and Self-Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):118-119.
    As understood by neodissociation and sociocognitive theorists, hypnotic responses are instances of self-deception. Neodissociation theory matches the strict definition of Sackeim and Gur (1978) and sociocognitive theory matches Mele's looser definition. Recent data indicate that many hypnotized individuals deceive themselves into holding conflicting beliefs without dissociating, but others convince themselves that the suggested state of affairs is true without simultaneously holding a contrary belief.
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  10.  17
    Irving Kirsch & Steven Jay Lynn (2004). Hypnosis and Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):667-668.
    Although we are sympathetic to his central thesis about the illusion of will, having previously advanced a similar proposal, Wegner's account of hypnosis is flawed. Hypnotic behavior derives from specific suggestions that are given, rather than from the induction, of trance, and it can be observed in 90% of the population. Thus, it is very pertinent to the illusion of will. However, Wegner exaggerates the loss of subjective will in hypnosis.
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  11.  1
    Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch & Josh Knox (2007). State Debate. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press
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  12.  0
    Irving Kirsch (1986). Role Playing Versus Response Expectancy as Explanations of Hypnotic Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):475.
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    Irving Kirsch (2001). The Altered States of Hypnosis. Social Research 68:795-810.
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  14.  0
    Irving Kirsch (1991). The Placebo Effect as a Conditioned Response: Failures of the “Litmus Test. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):200-201.
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  15. Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Lilienfeld & O. Scott (2007). Hypnosis and Neuroscience: Implications for the Altered State Debate. In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. OUP Oxford
     
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