Search results for 'Irwin Gill' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Christopher Gill & T. Irwin (1979). Plato's Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues. Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:176.
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  2.  5
    John Adlam, Irwin Gill, Shane N. Glackin, Brendan D. Kelly, Christopher Scanlon & Seamus Mac Suibhne (2013). Perspectives on Erving Goffman's “Asylums” Fifty Years On. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):605-613.
    Erving Goffman’s “Asylums” is a key text in the development of contemporary, community-orientated mental health practice. It has survived as a trenchant critique of the asylum as total institution, and its publication in 1961 in book form marked a further stage in the discrediting of the asylum model of mental health care. In this paper, some responses from a range of disciplines to this text, 50 years on, are presented. A consultant psychiatrist with a special interest in cultural psychiatry and (...)
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  3.  13
    Eric Gill (1991). Eric Gill's Review of Chesterton's. The Chesterton Review 17 (1):119-122.
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  4. Michael Gill, Rationalism, Sentimentalism, and Ralph Cudworth Michael B. Gill Section.
    Moral rationalism is the view that morality originates in reason alone. It is often contrasted with moral sentimentalism, which is the view that the origin of morality lies at least partly in (non-rational) sentiment. The eighteenth century saw pitched philosophical battles between rationalists and sentimentalists, and the issue continues to fuel disputes among moral philosophers today.
     
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  5.  4
    Mary Louise Gill (1993). "Aristotle on Substance: The Paradox of Unity", by Mary Louise Gill. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):209.
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  6.  2
    Jerry H. Gill (1978). Reasons of the Heart: A Polanyian Reflection: JERRY H. GILL. Religious Studies 14 (2):143-157.
    Reasoning about religion would seem to involve both explicit and tacit factors. These latter are what Pascal had in mind when he spoke of the ‘reasons of the heart which the reason knows not of’. Moreover, these reasons of the heart are the more interesting by virtue of being at least the more difficult and perhaps the more crucial. In these pages I want to examine the notion of reasons of the heart from the angle provided by the insights of (...)
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  7.  1
    Jerry H. Gill (1974). Saying and Showing: Radical Themes in Wittgenstein's On Certainty: JERRY H. GILL. Religious Studies 10 (3):279-290.
    There are themes in Wittgenstein's later work which are extremely radical. By ‘radical’ I mean both that they cut to the very root of crucial philosophical issues, and that they tend to be ignored by the established philosophical positions of the day. More specifically, these themes focus on the understanding of epistemological bedrock, and they lead in directions about which it is difficult to get a hearing in major philosophical circles.
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  8. Sam D. Gill (forthcoming). Dictionary of Native American Mythology, Bv Sam D. Gill and Irene F. Sullivan. ABC. Clio.
     
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  9. Eric Gill (1920). Mr. Eric Gill's Reply. New Blackfriars 1 (7):434-435.
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  10. Jerry H. Gill (1968). Paul Tillich's Religious Epistemology: JERRY H. GILL. Religious Studies 3 (2):477-498.
    There is good reason to believe that Paul Tillich would have objected to the title of this paper. Several years ago I heard him begin a lecture on ‘Religious Existentialism’ with the comment, ‘There is no such thing as Religious Existentialism because there is only Religious Existentialism’. Similarly, he might have objected to the present paper's title by suggesting that every search for knowledge is, consciously or unconsciously, a religious search.
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  11.  73
    Terence Irwin (1988). Aristotle's First Principles. Oxford University Press.
    Exploring Aristotle's philosophical method and the merits of his conclusions, Irwin here shows how Aristotle defends dialectic against the objection that it cannot justify a metaphysical realist's claims. He focuses particularly on Aristotle's metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics, stressing the connections between doctrines that are often discussed separately.
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  12. Terence Irwin (1995). Plato's Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This exceptional book examines and explains Plato's answer to the normative question, "How ought we to live?" It discusses Plato's conception of the virtues; his views about the connection between the virtues and happiness; and the account of reason, desire, and motivation that underlies his arguments about the virtues. Plato's answer to the epistemological question, "How can we know how we ought to live?" is also discussed. His views on knowledge, belief, and inquiry, and his theory of Forms, are examined, (...)
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  13.  24
    Alan Irwin (1995). Citizen Science: A Study of People, Expertise, and Sustainable Development. Routledge.
    We are all concerned by the environmental threats facing us today. Environmental issues are a major area of concern for policy makers, industrialists and public groups of many different kinds. While science seems central to our understanding of such threats, the statements of scientists are increasingly open to challenge in this area. Meanwhile, citizens may find themselves labelled as "ignorant" in environmental matters. In Citizen Science Alan Irwin provides a much needed route through the fraught relationship between science, the (...)
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  14.  24
    Michael Gill (2006). The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. Cambridge ;Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then from theistic commitments altogether. (...)
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  15.  79
    Terence Irwin (2009). The Development of Ethics: A Historical and Critical Study. Oxford University Press.
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
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  16. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological (...)
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  17. Christopher Gill (2006). The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Christopher Gill offers a new analysis of what is innovative in Hellenistic - especially Stoic and Epicurean - philosophical thinking about selfhood and personality. His wide-ranging discussion of Stoic and Epicurean ideas is illustrated by a more detailed examination of the Stoic theory of the passions and a new account of the history of this theory. His study also tackles issues about the historical study of selfhood and the relationship between philosophy and literature, especially the presentation of the collapse (...)
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  18.  17
    Michael B. Gill (2011). Humean Moral Pluralism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (1):45.
    Michael B. Gill offers a new account of Humean moral pluralism: the view that there are different moral reasons for action, which are based on human sentiments. He explores its historical origins, and argues that it offers the most compelling view of our moral experience. Together, pluralism and Humeanism make a philosophically powerful couple.
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  19. S. P. Gill (1998). Body Language: The Unspoken Dialogue of Bodies in Rhythm. Proceedings of the Essli Workshop on Mutual Knowledge, Common Ground and Public Information. Gill Sp (1999) Mediation and Communication of Information in the Cultural Interface. In Special Issue on Science, Technology and Society. Ai Soc 13:1-17.
  20.  22
    Robin Gill (2006). Health Care and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    How can Christian ethics make a significant contribution to health care ethics in today's Western, pluralistic society? Robin Gill examines the 'moral gaps' in secular accounts of health care ethics and the tensions within specifically theological accounts. He explores the healing stories in the Synoptic Gospels, identifying four core virtues present within them - compassion, care, faith and humility - that might bring greater depth to a purely secular interpretation of health care ethics. Each of these virtues is examined (...)
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  21.  28
    Christopher Gill (2006). The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought. Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Gill offers a new analysis of what is innovative in Hellenistic--especially Stoic and Epicurean--philosophical thinking about selfhood and personality. His wide-ranging discussion of Stoic and Epicurean ideas is illustrated by a more detailed examination of the Stoic theory of the passions and a new account of the history of this theory. His study also tackles issues about the historical study of selfhood and the relationship between philosophy and literature, especially the presentation of the collapse of character in Plutrarch's (...)
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  22.  26
    Christopher Gill (ed.) (2005). Virtue, Norms, and Objectivity: Issues in Ancient and Modern Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    For much of the twentieth century it was common to contrast the characteristic forms and preoccupations of modern ethical theory with those of the ancient world. However, the last few decades have seen a growing recognition that contemporary moral philosophy now has much in common with its ancient incarnation, in areas as diverse as virtue ethics and ethical epistemology. Christopher Gill has assembled an international team to conduct a fascinating exploration of the relationship between the two fields, exploring key (...)
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  23.  6
    Terence Irwin (1989). Classical Thought. Oxford University Press.
    Covering over 1000 years of classical philosophy from Homer to Saint Augustine, this accessible, comprehensive study details the major philosophies and philosophers of the period--the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Neoplatonism. Though the emphasis is on questions of philosophical interest, particularly ethics, the theory of knowledge, philosophy of mind, and philosophical theology, Irwin includes discussions of the literary and historical background to classical philosophy as well as the work of other important thinkers--Greek tragedians, historians, medical writers, and (...)
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  24. Terence Irwin (ed.) (1999). Classical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This Oxford Reader seeks to introduce some of the main philosophical questions raised by the Greek and Roman philosophers of classical antiquity. Selections from the writings of ancient philosophers are interspersed with Terence Irwin's incisive commentary, and sometimes with contributions from modern philosophers expounding relevant philosophical positions or discussing particular aspects of classical philosophy. The arrangement of the book is thematic, rather than chronological, allowing the reader to focus on philosophical problems and ideas, but a general introduction places philosophers (...)
     
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  25.  3
    C. J. Rowe, Plato & T. Irwin (1982). Gorgias. Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:249.
    The Gorgias is a vivid introduction to the central problems of moral and political philosophy. In the notes to his translation, Professor Irwin discusses the historical and social context of the dialogue, expounds and criticises the arguments, and tries above all to suggest the questions a modern reader ought to raise about Plato's doctrines. No knowledge of Greek is necessary.
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  26. Robin Gill (1999). Churchgoing and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Robin Gill argues that once moral communities (such as churchgoers) take centre stage in ethics - as they do in virtue ethics - then there should be a greater interest in sociological evidence about these communities. This book examines recent evidence, gathered from social attitude surveys, about church communities, in particular their views on faith, moral order and love. It shows that churchgoers are distinctive in their attitudes and behaviour. Some of their attitudes change over time, and there are (...)
     
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  27.  11
    Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh & John Wilkins (eds.) (2009). Galen and the World of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Christopher Gill, Tim Whitmarsh and John Wilkins: 1. Galen's library Vivian Nutton; 2. Conventions of prefatory self-presentation in Galen's On the Order of My Own Books Jason König; 3. Demiurge and emperor in Galen's world of knowledge Rebecca Flemming; 4. Shock and awe: the performance dimension of Galen's anatomy demonstrations Maud Gleason; 5. Galen's un-Hippocratic case-histories G. E. R. Lloyd; 6. Staging the past, staging oneself: Galen on Hellenistic exegetical traditions Heinrich von Staden; 7. (...)
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  28. Michael B. Gill (2014). Humean Moral Pluralism. OUP Oxford.
    Michael B. Gill offers a new account of Humean moral pluralism: the view that there are different moral reasons for action, which are based on human sentiments. He explores its historical origins, and argues that it offers the most compelling view of our moral experience. Together, pluralism and Humeanism make a philosophically powerful couple.
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  29. Christopher Gill (2013). Marcus Aurelius: Meditations, Books 1-6. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Christopher Gill provides a new translation and commentary on the first half of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, and a full introduction to the Meditations as a whole. The Meditations constitute a unique and remarkable work, a reflective diary or notebook by a Roman emperor, that is based on Stoic philosophy but presented in a highly distinctive way. This new edition will help students and scholars of ancient philosophy make sense of a work whose intellectual content and status have often been (...)
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  30. Rosalind Gill & Christina Scharff (eds.) (2011). New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism, and Subjectivity. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Preface; A.McRobbie -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction; C.Scharff & R.Gill -- PART I: SEXUAL SUBJECTIVITY AND THE MAKEOVER PARADIGM -- Pregnant Beauty: Maternal Femininities under Neoliberalism; I.Tyler -- The Right to Be Beautiful: Postfeminist Identity and Consumer Beauty Advertising; M.M.Lazar -- Spicing It Up: Sexual Entrepreneurs and The Sex Inspectors; L.Harvey & R.Gill -- '(M)Other-in-Chief: Michelle Obama and the Ideal of Republican Womanhood'; L.Guerrero -- Scourging the Abject Body: Ten Years (...)
     
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  31. Mary Louise Gill (2014). Philosophos: Plato's Missing Dialogue. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Mary Louise Gill presents a bold new explanation of the fact that the dialogue which Plato promised to write on the Philosopher, complementing the Sophist and the Statesman, is missing. Gill argues that he left it unwritten in order to stimulate his readers and encourage them to work out, for themselves, the portrait it would have contained.
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  32. Michael B. Gill (2006). The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this 2006 volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then (...)
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  33. Michael B. Gill (2006). The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this 2006 volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then (...)
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  34. Michael B. Gill (2011). The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this 2006 volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then (...)
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  35. Robin Gill (ed.) (2011). The Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    In this second edition of the best-selling Cambridge Companion to Christian Ethics, Robin Gill brings together twenty essays by leading experts, to provide a comprehensive introduction to Christian ethics which is both authoritative and up to date. This volume boasts four entirely new chapters, while previous chapters and all bibliographies have been updated to reflect significant developments in the field over the last decade. Gill offers a superb overview of the subject, examining the scriptural bases of ethics as (...)
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  36. Frances E. Gill (2003). The Moral Benefit of Punishment: Self-Determination as a Goal of Correctional Counseling. Lexington Books.
    In this provocative work, Frances E. Gill argues that self-determination is a universal goal of correctional counseling. Gill leads the reader through a rigorous philosophical justification of the paternalism of state punishment in service of this goal.
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  37. Christopher Gill (2006). The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought. OUP Oxford.
    Christopher Gill offers a wide-ranging and original account of what is new and distinctive in Hellenistic and Roman ideas about selfhood and personality. He focuses upon Stoic and Epicurean philosophy and its relationship to earlier Greek thought and contemporary literature.
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  38. Douglas A. Irwin (2009). Free Trade Under Fire: Third Edition. Princeton University Press.
    Growing international trade has helped lift living standards around the world, and yet free trade is always under attack. Critics complain that trade forces painful economic adjustments, such as plant closings and layoffs of workers, and charge that the World Trade Organization serves the interests of corporations, undercuts domestic environmental regulations, and erodes America's sovereignty. Why has global trade become so controversial? Does free trade deserve its bad reputation? In Free Trade under Fire, Douglas Irwin sweeps aside the misconceptions (...)
     
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  39. Terence Irwin (ed.) (1979). Gorgias. Clarendon Press.
    The Gorgias is a vivid introduction to the central problems of moral and political philosophy. In the notes to his translation, Professor Irwin discusses the historical and social context of the dialogue, expounds and criticises the arguments, and tries above all to suggest the questions a modern reader ought to raise about Plato's doctrines. No knowledge of Greek is necessary.
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  40. Terence Irwin (2009). The Development of Ethics, Volume 3: From Kant to Rawls. OUP Oxford.
    This is the third of three volumes which together comprise a selective historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy. Here Terence Irwin covers the period from the late 18th to the late 20th century, with illuminating discussion of the Kantian tradition, utilitarianism, intuitionism, naturalism, idealism, and non-cognitivism.
     
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  41. Terence Irwin (2007). The Development of Ethics: Volume 1: From Socrates to the Reformation. Clarendon Press.
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
     
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  42. Terence Irwin (2011). The Development of Ethics: Three Volume Set. OUP Oxford.
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the entire development of Western moral philosophy. The first volume covers ancient and medieval thought; the second the early modern period; the third goes from the late 18th to the late 20th century. Irwin offers illuminating discussion of every important thinker in the history of ethics.
     
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  43. Terence Irwin (2011). The Development of Ethics: Volume 1: From Socrates to the Reformation. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
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  44. Terence Irwin (2011). The Development of Ethics: Volume 2: From Suarez to Rousseau. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Development of Ethics is a selective historical and critical study of moral philosophy in the Socratic tradition, with special attention to Aristotelian naturalism. It discusses the main topics of moral philosophy as they have developed historically, including: the human good, human nature, justice, friendship, and morality; the methods of moral inquiry; the virtues and their connexions; will, freedom, and responsibility; reason and emotion; relativism, subjectivism, and realism; the theological aspect of morality. This volume examines early modern moral philosophy from (...)
     
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  45. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
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  46. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
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  47. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _ X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. (...)
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  48. William Irwin, Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.) (2009). X-Men and Philosophy: Astonishing Insight and Uncanny Argument in the Mutant X-Verse. Wiley.
    _X-Men_ is one of the most popular comic book franchises ever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films, cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This is the first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and the choices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, human ethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice. J. Jeremy Wisnewski is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy and Philosophy and The Office and Philosophy. Rebecca (...)
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  49. Christopher Gill (ed.) (2013). Marcus Aurelius: Meditations, Books 1-6. OUP Oxford.
    Christopher Gill provides a new translation and commentary on the first half of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, and a full introduction to this unique and remarkable work: a reflective diary or notebook by a Roman emperor, whose content is based on Stoic philosophy but presented in a highly distinctive way.
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  50. Jerome D. Oremland & Merton M. Gill (eds.) (1991). Interpretation and Interaction: Psychoanalysis or Psychotherapy? Routledge.
    In recent decades the relationship between psychoanalysis and psychotherapy has been a focal point for debate about the distinctiveness of analysis as a particular kind of therapeutic enterprise. In _Interpretation and Interaction_, Jerome Oremland invokes the interventions of "interpretation" and "interaction," rooted in the values of understanding and amelioration, respectively, as a conceptual basis for reappraising these important issues. In place of the commonly accepted triadic division among psychoanalysis, exploratory psychotherapy, and supportive psychotherapy, he proposes a new triad: psychoanalysis, psychoanalytically-oriented (...)
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