19 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Ishani Maitra (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor)
  1. Ishani Maitra & Brian Weatherson, In Defence of the ACA's Medicaid Expansion.
    The only part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (hereafter, ‘the ACA’) struck down in National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) et al. v. Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services, et al. was a provision expanding Medicaid. We will argue that this was a mistake; the provision should not have been struck down. We’ll do this by identifying a test that C.J. Roberts used to justify his view that this provision was unconstitutional. We’ll defend that test against (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ishani Maitra, On Racist Hate Speech and the Scope of a Free Speech Principle.
    As a liberal society, we are deeply committed to a principle of free speech. In fact, this commitment is so entrenched that it often seems to trump other very important liberal values, such as equality. Critical race theorists, among others, have argued that (some) racist hate speech ought to be regulated because it harms racial minorities in ways that are incompatible with racial equality, and so, in ways that a liberal society ought to prevent. A standard liberal response to these (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ishani Maitra, Why Take Our Word for It?
    We find out a lot about the world through people telling us things. And we can (and do) come to know many of these things that people tell us, without running background checks to make sure that the tellers are reliable (in the sense that they are likely to know what they are talking about), or trustworthy (in the sense that they are likely to tell us what they know, rather than just whatever is easiest to say, or whatever would (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ishani Maitra & Daniel Nolan, Why Take Our Word for It?
    We find out a lot about the world through people telling us things. And we can (and do) come to know many of these things that people tell us, without running background checks to make sure that the tellers are reliable (in the sense that they are likely to know what they are talking about), or trustworthy (in the sense that they are likely to tell us what they know, rather than just whatever is easiest to say, or whatever would (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ishani Maitra (2013). Subordination and Objectification. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (1):87-100.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ishani Maitra (2012). Subordinating Speech1. In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. 94.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (eds.) (2012). Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford University Press.
    This volume draws on a range of approaches in order to explore the problem and determine what ought to be done about allegedly harmful speech.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ishani Maitra, Brian Weatherson & Jonathan Ichikawa (2012). In Defense of a Kripkean Dogma. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):56-68.
    In “Against Arguments from Reference” (Mallon et al., 2009), Ron Mallon, Edouard Machery, Shaun Nichols, and Stephen Stich (hereafter, MMNS) argue that recent experiments concerning reference undermine various philosophical arguments that presuppose the correctness of the causal-historical theory of reference. We will argue three things in reply. First, the experiments in question—concerning Kripke’s Gödel/Schmidt example—don’t really speak to the dispute between descriptivism and the causal-historical theory; though the two theories are empirically testable, we need to look at quite different data (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ishani Maitra (2011). Assertion, Norms, and Games. In Jessica Brown & Herman Cappelen (eds.), Assertion: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press. 277--296.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ishani Maitra (2010). The Nature of Epistemic Injustice. Philosophical Books 51 (4):195-211.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (2010). On Silencing, Rape, and Responsibility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):167 – 172.
    In a recent article in this journal, Nellie Wieland argues that silencing in the sense put forward by Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby has the unpalatable consequence of diminishing a rapist's responsibility for the rape. We argue both that Wieland misidentifies Langton and Hornsby's conception of silencing, and that neither Langton and Hornsby's actual conception, nor the one that Wieland attributes to them, in fact generates this consequence.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ishani Maitra & Brian Weatherson (2010). Assertion, Knowledge, and Action. Philosophical Studies 149 (1):99 - 118.
    We argue against the knowledge rule of assertion, and in favour of integrating the account of assertion more tightly with our best theories of evidence and action. We think that the knowledge rule has an incredible consequence when it comes to practical deliberation, that it can be right for a person to do something that she can't properly assert she can do. We develop some vignettes that show how this is possible, and how odd this consequence is. We then argue (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ishani Maitra (2009). Silencing Speech. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):pp. 309-338.
    Pornography deserves special protections, it is often said, because it qualifies as speech. Therefore, no matter what we think of its content, we must afford it the protections that we extend to most speech, but don’t extend to other actions.1 In response, Jennifer Hornsby and Rae Langton have argued that the case is not so simple: one of the harms of pornography, they claim, is that it silences women’s speech, thereby preventing women from deriving from speech the very benefits that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Mary Kate McGowan & Ishani Maitra (2009). On Racist Hate Speech and the Scope of a Free Speech Principle. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (2):343-372.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ishani Maitra (2008). Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy. Philosophy 4 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ishani Maitra (2007). How and Why to Be a Moderate Contextualist. In Gerhard Preyer & Georg Peter (eds.), Context Sensitivity and Semantic Minimalism: New Essays on Semantics and Pragmatics. Oxford University Press. 111-132.
    Much recent work in the philosophy of language has focused on the extent to which what linguistic expressions express depends upon context. It is (relatively) uncontroversial that some expressions are context-sensitive, for instance, indexicals like ‘I’, and demonstratives like ‘this’. But there is little agreement beyond this point. On some views (the Minimalist views), there is little context-sensitivity in the language that goes beyond these uncontroversially context-dependent expressions. On other views (the Radical Contextualist views), context-sensitivity is everywhere in our language. (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan (2007). The Limits of Free Speech: Pornography and the Question of Coverage. Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.
    Many liberal societies are deeply committed to freedom of speech. This commitment is so entrenched that when it seems to come into conflict with other commitments (e.g., gender equality), it is often argued that the commitment to speech must trump the other commitments. In this paper, we argue that a proper understanding of our commitment to free speech requires being clear about what should count as speech for these purposes. On the approach we defend, should get a special, technical sense, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mary Kate McGowan & Ishani Maitra (2007). The Ethics of Free Speech. Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ishani Maitra (2004). Silence and Responsibility. Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):189–208.
    In this paper, I shall be concerned with the phenomenon that has been labeled silencing in some of the recent philosophical literature. A speaker who is silenced in this sense is unable to make herself understood, even though her audience hears every word she utters. For instance, consider a woman who says “No”, intending to refuse sex. Her audience fails to recognize her intention to refuse, because he thinks that women tend to be insincere, and to not say what they (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation