Search results for 'Islamic ethics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
See also:
  1.  61
    Mohammad Ashraf Adeel (2008). Islamic Ethics and the Controversy About the Moral Heart of Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):151-156.
    This essay briefly evaluates the ongoing controversy between LIU Qingping and GUO Qiyong (and their followers) about the “moral heart ”of Confucianism in order to draw acomparison with Islamic ethics for mutual illumination of the two traditions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  3
    George Fadlo Hourani (1985). Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume collects the published essays of the late Professor Hourani on Islamic ethics in the earlier classical and formative periods of Islamic civilisation. Ethics was from the start at the core of Islam, and the construction of philosophical theories to support normative ethics made those centuries among the most profound and intensely active in the history of ethical thought. The book opens with two general and contextual pieces and thereafter it is organised by schools (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  3. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim cultures. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  4.  39
    Tariq Ramadan (2013). The Challenges and Future of Applied Islamic Ethics Discourse: A Radical Reform? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):105-115.
    In this paper, I explore the concept of applied Islamic ethics, the facts, its challenges, and its future. I aim to highlight some of the deep-rooted issues that Muslims have faced historically and continue to experience today as they apply religious guidance to their daily lives. I consider the causes and rationale behind the current situation and look beyond to suggest ways in which this may evolve, calling for a radical reform. Muslims throughout the world are experiencing a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  66
    Mariam Attar (2010). Islamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought. Routledge.
    This book explores philosophical ethics in Arabo-Islamic thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Iljas Ismail (1980). Islamic Ethics and Morality. Convislam.
  7.  8
    Eddy S. Fang & Renaud Foucart (2014). Western Financial Agents and Islamic Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):475-491.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  1
    Mohsen Rezaei Aderyani & Mehrzad Kiani (2015). A Comparative Study of the Foundations of Medical Ethics in Secular and Islamic Thought. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):27-46.
    The principles of medical ethics, common as they are in the world at the present time, have been formed in the context of Western secular communities; consequently, secular principles and values are inevitably manifested in all corners of medical ethics. Medical ethics is at its infancy in Iran. In order to incorporate medical ethics into the country's health system, either the same thoughts, principles, rules, and codes of Western communities should be translated and taught across the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  25
    Aasim I. Padela (2007). Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer. Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.
    ABSTRACTModern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic Medical (...) literature, from that aimed at developing moral character to writings grounded in Islamic law. In the latter form, there is an attempt to derive an Islamic perspective on bioethical issues such as abortion, gender relations within the patient‐doctor relationship, end‐of‐life care and euthanasia. It is hoped that the insights gained will aid both clinicians and ethicists to better understand the Islamic paradigm of medical ethics and thereby positively affect patient care. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10.  18
    Ayman Shabana (2013). Law and Ethics in Islamic Bioethics: Nonmaleficence in Islamic Paternity Regulations. Zygon 48 (3):709-731.
    In Islamic law paternity is treated as a consequence of a licit sexual relationship. Since DNA testing makes a clear distinction between legal and biological paternity possible, it challenges the continued correlation between paternity and marriage. This article explores the foundations of paternity regulations in the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, with a particular focus on what is termed here “the licit sex principle,” and investigates the extent to which a harm-based argument can be made either by appeal to or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  11.  14
    Mohammed Ghaly (2014). Pre‐Modern Islamic Medical Ethics and Graeco‐Islamic‐Jewish Embryology. Bioethics 28 (2):49-58.
    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumayʽ (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio-ethical implications of these Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al-Dīn al-Qarāfī (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  7
    Najma Mohamed (2014). Islamic Education, Eco-Ethics and Community. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (3):315-328.
    Amid the growing coalescence between the religion and ecology movements, the voice of Muslims who care for the earth and its people is rising. While the Islamic position on the environment is not well-represented in the ecotheology discourse, it advances an environmental imaginary which shows how faith can be harnessed as a vehicle for social change. This article will draw upon doctoral research which synthesised the Islamic ecological ethic (eco-ethic) from sacred texts, traditions and contemporary thought, and illustrated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  8
    Abbas J. Ali & Abdulrahman Al-Aali (2015). Marketing and Ethics: What Islamic Ethics Have Contributed and the Challenges Ahead. Journal of Business Ethics 129 (4):833-845.
    This article examines the role of Islamic ethics in the marketing field. It presents Islamic contributions to the field by referencing original sources and concepts that are often not easily available to researchers and practitioners alike. In foundational texts, Islamic ethics have their own marketing practice prescriptions, practices that are driven by a discipline which shuns any dichotomy between organizational and societal interests. The paper underscores the role of marketers in improving the well-being of individuals (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  11
    S. Aksoy (2010). Some Principles of Islamic Ethics as Found in Harrisian Philosophy. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):226-229.
    John Harris is one of the prominent philosophers and bioethicists of our time. He has published tens of books and hundreds of papers throughout his professional life. This paper aims to take a ‘deep-look’ at Harris' works to argue that it is possible to find some principles of Islamic ethics in Harrisian philosophy, namely in his major works, as well as in his personal life. This may be surprising, or thought of as a ‘big’ and ‘groundless’ claim, since (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Rafik Issa Beekun (1997). Islamic Business Ethics. International Institute of Islamic Thought.
  16.  16
    Vardit Rispler-Chaim (1993). Islamic Medical Ethics in the Twentieth Century. Brill.
    Titel oversat: Islamisk, medicinsk etik i det tyvende århundrede.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. A. Kevin Reinhart (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life : Future Challenges. In Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.), Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press
  18.  3
    Fahri Karakas, Emine Sarigollu & Mustafa Kavas (2015). Discourses of Collective Spirituality and Turkish Islamic Ethics: An Inquiry Into Transcendence, Connectedness, and Virtuousness in Anatolian Tigers. Journal of Business Ethics 129 (4):811-822.
    Based on case studies and qualitative interviews conducted with 40 stakeholders in five SMEs, or so called Anatolian tigers, in Turkey, this article has explored what collective spirituality and Turkish Islamic business ethics entail and how they shape organizational values using diverse stakeholder perspectives. The study has revealed six emergent discourses around collective spirituality and Islamic business ethics: Flying with both wings; striving to transcend egos; being devoted to each other; treating people as whole persons; upholding (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Fadlou Shehadi (1971). Islamic Rationalism the Ethics of Abd Al-Jabbar. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Shahzad Qaiser (2009). Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Islamic Perspectives. Islamic Research Institute.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim (1986). Islamic Ethics and the Implications of Modern Biomedical Technology: An Analysis of Some Issues Pertaining to Reproductive Control, Biotechnical Parenting and Abortion. Dissertation, Temple University
    The raison d'etre of this dissertation is the Muslim dilemma when confronted with some of the biotechnological innovations which relate to the precautionary measures to prevent the birth of children, technological manipulation in order to overcome infertility and the termination of fetal life. All of these issues are directly related to human life and thus pose serious problems. The Muslim is one whose life is regulated by the teachings of the Qur'an and Sunnah of the Prophet. Hence, his action is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  59
    Mohammad Saeed, Zafar U. Ahmed & Syeda-Masooda Mukhtar (2001). International Marketing Ethics From an Islamic Perspective: A Value-Maximization Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):127 - 142.
    International marketing practices, embedded in a strong ethical doctrine, can play a vital role in raising the standards of business conduct worldwide, while in no way compromising the quality of services or products offered to customers, or surrendering the profit margins of businesses. Adherence to such ethical practices can help to elevate the standards of behavior and thus of living, of traders and consumers alike. Against this background, this paper endeavors to identify the salient features of the Islamic framework (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  23.  1
    M. Kabir (2007). Who is a Parent? Parenthood in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):605.
    The ethical and legal challenges posed by assisted reproduction techniques are both profound and breathtaking, with most societies unable to fully comprehend one technique before another one, even more daring, emerges. The wrongful implantation of embryos in two women undergoing in vitro fertilisation treatments at two separate clinics in the UK seriously vitiates the traditional concept of who is a parent. In one case, a patient’s embryos were wrongly implanted into another woman seeking similar treatment, and in the second, a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  6
    M. K. Banu Az-Zubair (2007). Who is a Parent? Parenthood in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):605-609.
    The ethical and legal challenges posed by assisted reproduction techniques are both profound and breathtaking, with most societies unable to fully comprehend one technique before another one, even more daring, emerges. The wrongful implantation of embryos in two women undergoing in vitro fertilisation treatments at two separate clinics in the UK seriously vitiates the traditional concept of who is a parent. In one case, a patient’s embryos were wrongly implanted into another woman seeking similar treatment, and in the second, a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    M. K. Banu Az-Zubair (2007). Who is a Parent? Parenthood in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):605-609.
    The ethical and legal challenges posed by assisted reproduction techniques are both profound and breathtaking, with most societies unable to fully comprehend one technique before another one, even more daring, emerges. The wrongful implantation of embryos in two women undergoing in vitro fertilisation treatments at two separate clinics in the UK seriously vitiates the traditional concept of who is a parent. In one case, a patient’s embryos were wrongly implanted into another woman seeking similar treatment, and in the second, a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  20
    Bayu Taufiq Possumah, Abdul Ghafar Ismail & Shahida Shahimi (2013). Bringing Work Back in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):257-270.
    Religion and work are seldom discussed. The two have caused scholars to question the religion’s role with work. This paper reviews research on the integrate between religion and work by examining issues of concept, definition, measurement, and reviewing research that examines the relationship of work and religion with respect to: different times, types of people, organize human interactions and sources of knowledge. We then discuss the methodological requirement for reintegrating work studies into social institutional theory and indicate what the conceptual (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27. Ali Rizvi (2010). Islamic Environmental Ethics and the Challenge of Anthropocentrism. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC SOCIAL SCIENCES 27 (3):53-78.
    Lynn White’s seminal article on the historical roots of the ecological crisis, which inspired radical environmentalism, has cast suspicion upon religion as the source of modern anthropocentrism. To pave the way for a viable Islamic environmental ethics, charges of anthropocentrism need to be faced and rebutted. Therefore, the bulk of this paper will seek to establish the non- anthropocentric credentials of Islamic thought. Islam rejects all forms of anthropocentrism by insisting upon a transcendent God who is utterly (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  29.  14
    Beverly Dawn Metcalfe & Jawad Syed (2015). New Conceptual Foundations for Islamic Business Ethics: The Contributions of Abu-Hamid Al-Ghazali. Journal of Business Ethics 129 (4):847-857.
    The dominant approach to understanding Islamic Business Ethics has been based almost exclusively on either interpretations of the Qur’an and Sunna or influenced by Western understanding of Islam and ethics. However, there is a rich—largely ignored-tradition of ethical analysis conducted by Muslim philosophers which would broaden our understanding of Islamic ethics and hence IBE. We seek to correct this imbalance by examining works of Al-Ghazali, an early Muslim philosopher, scholar, and mystic. His approach to Sufism, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  7
    A. Kevin Reinhart (2005). Origins of Islamic Ethics: Foundations and Constructions. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub. 244--253.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  14
    Dale Maurice Riepe (1988). Book Review:Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. George Hourani. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (3):588-.
  32.  4
    Salam Abdallah (2010). Islamic Ethics: An Exposition for Resolving ICT Ethical Dilemmas. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 8 (3):289-301.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    John Kelsay (2013). Islamic Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Bülent Şenay (2010). Change And Changeability: Ethics Of Disagreement And Public Space In Islamic Thought. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):128-162.
    The paper advocates that a middle ground between the many theories attempting to explain Islam and its view on the relationship between politics and religion is provided by the textual and discursive approaches. Islamist and/or Islamic revivalist movements are essentially concerned with the relationship between religion and social reality in the context of ‘change’. Worldly politics and the hermeneutics of disagreement also essentially deal with ‘change’ and ‘public space’. What is ‘changeable’ and what is ‘unchangeable’ is a question of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Ismaʼil R. al Faruqi (1989). Islamic Ethics. In S. Cromwell Crawford (ed.), World Religions and Global Ethics. Paragon House Publishers
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Sohail H. Hashmi (2004). Islamic Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: An Argument for Nonproliferation. In Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.), Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press 321--352.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  28
    Anthony Robert Booth, Islamic Philosophy & the Ethics of Belief.
    In this book the author argues that the Falasifa, the Philosophers of the Islamic Golden Age, are usefully interpreted through the prism of the contemporary, western ethics of belief. He contends that their position amounts to what he calls ‘Moderate Evidentialism’ – that only for the epistemic elite what one ought to believe is determined by one’s evidence. The author makes the case that the Falasifa’s position is well argued, ingeniously circumvents issues in the epistemology of testimony, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  21
    Beverly Dawn Metcalfe & Jawad Syed (2015). How Islamic Business Ethics Impact Women Entrepreneurs: Insights From Four Arab Middle Eastern Countries. Journal of Business Ethics 129 (4):859-877.
    This study explores how Islamic business ethics and values impact the way in which Muslim women entrepreneurs conduct their business in the Arab world. Guided by institutional theory as a theoretical framework and social constructionism as a philosophical stance, this study uses a qualitative, interview-based methodology. Capitalizing on in-depth, face-to-face interviews with Muslim Arab women entrepreneurs across four countries in the Arab Middle East region, the results portray how Islamic work values and ethics are embedded in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  16
    Tanri Abeng (1997). Business Ethics in Islamic Context: Perspectives of a Muslim Business Leader. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):47-54.
    The role of the business leader is key to develop the culture of an enterprise. To exemplify its importance in the national and globalcontext, the Muslim author from Indonesia points with admiration to Konosuke Matsushita, founder of Matsushita Electric Corporation, who already in the 1930s set up the seven ethical principles for healthy business growth, which also are commended by the Islamic imperative. Due to the current dynamic business environment, Muslims find themselves confronted with serious dilemmas and need guidance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  40.  25
    Tanri Abeng (1997). Business Ethics in Islamic Context. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):47-54.
    The role of the business leader is key to develop the culture of an enterprise. To exemplify its importance in the national and globalcontext, the Muslim author from Indonesia points with admiration to Konosuke Matsushita, founder of Matsushita Electric Corporation, who already in the 1930s set up the seven ethical principles for healthy business growth, which also are commended by the Islamic imperative. Due to the current dynamic business environment, Muslims find themselves confronted with serious dilemmas and need guidance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  41.  58
    Majid Fakhry (1988). Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (4):660-662.
  42.  39
    Vivienne Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Islamic Fundamentalism: On the Limits of Discourse Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):153-166.
    Using the example of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism, and especially the writings of Sayyid Qutb, this article raises questions about discourse ethics as a mode of conflict resolution. It appears that discourse ethics is only relevant when all parties have already agreed to settle disputes deliberatively and already share the notions of rational deliberation and individual autonomy. This raises questions not only about the capability of discourse ethics to incorporate a deep plurality of worldviews, but also about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  7
    V. Rispler-Chaim (1989). Islamic Medical Ethics in the 20th Century. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (4):203-208.
    While the practice of Western medicine is known today to doctors of all ethnic and religious groups, its standards are subject to the availability of resources. The medical ethics guiding each doctor is influenced by his/her religious or cultural background or affiliation, and that is where diversity exists. Much has been written about Jewish and Christian medical ethics. Islamic medical ethics has never been discussed as an independent field of ethics, although several selected topics, especially (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  16
    Charles E. Butterworth (1983). Ethics in Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Journal of Religious Ethics 11 (2):224 - 239.
    This essay focuses on three of Islam's best-known philosophers: Farabi, Avicenna, and Averroes. It sets forth and compares their ethical teaching on the following basic issues: (1) the relation of philosophy to religion, (2) the communal basis of ethics and the comcomitant role of statecraft, and (3) some specific charac- teristics of their ethical teaching. Throughout the essay the close connection of medieval Islamic with classical Greek philosophy is noted.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  8
    Oliver Leaman (1986). Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics By George Hourani Cambridge University Press, 1985, Xv+282 Pp., £25.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 61 (237):420-.
  46.  5
    Keith Cash (2004). Islamic Ethics. Nursing Philosophy 5 (2):185–186.
  47. Oliver Leaman (1986). HOURANI, GEORGE Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy 61:420.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  18
    Gillian Rice (2006). Pro-Environmental Behavior in Egypt: Is There a Role for Islamic Environmental Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):373 - 390.
    Egypt, a less affluent, predominantly Muslim country, suffers from numerous forms of environmental pollution, some severe. This study investigates pro-environmental behaviors of citizens in Cairo, Egypt’s largest metropolis, and studies the relationship between pro-environmental behavior and demographic variables, beliefs, values, and religiosity. Analysis shows that three types of pro-environmental behavior are present: Public Sphere, Private Sphere, and Activist Behavior, with the latter occurring less frequently. Importantly, the study identifies an ecocentric value among respondents which is correlated with Public Sphere Behavior. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  49.  56
    Shahnaz Naughton & Tony Naughton (2000). Religion, Ethics and Stock Trading: The Case of an Islamic Equities Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):145 - 159.
    Islamic banking, based on the prohibition of interest, is well established throughout the Muslim world. Attention has now turned towards applying Islamic principles in equity markets. The search for alternatives to Western style markets has been given added impetus in Muslim countries by the turmoil in Asian financial markets in 1997. Common stocks are a legitimate form of instrument in Islam, but many of the practices associated with stock trading are not. In this paper the instruments traded and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  50.  7
    John Kelsay (2007). Comparison and History in the Study of Religious Ethics: An Essay on Michael Cook's "Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought". [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):347 - 373.
    Qur'an 3:104 speaks of "commanding right and forbidding wrong" as a constitutive feature of the Muslim community. Michael Cook's careful and comprehensive study provides a wealth of information about the ways Muslims in various contexts have understood this notion. Cook also makes a number of comparative observations, and suggests that "commanding" appears to be a uniquely Muslim practice. Scholars of religious ethics should read Cook's study with great appreciation. They will also have a number of questions about his comparative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000