Search results for 'Islamic ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tariq Ramadan (2013). The Challenges and Future of Applied Islamic Ethics Discourse: A Radical Reform? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):105-115.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I explore the concept of applied Islamic ethics, the facts, its challenges, and its future. I aim to highlight some of the deep-rooted issues that Muslims have faced historically and continue to experience today as they apply religious guidance to their daily lives. I consider the causes and rationale behind the current situation and look beyond to suggest ways in which this may evolve, calling for a radical reform. Muslims throughout the world are experiencing a (...)
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  2. George Fadlo Hourani (1985). Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 180.0
    This volume collects the published essays of the late Professor Hourani on Islamic ethics in the earlier classical and formative periods of Islamic civilisation. Ethics was from the start at the core of Islam, and the construction of philosophical theories to support normative ethics made those centuries among the most profound and intensely active in the history of ethical thought. The book opens with two general and contextual pieces and thereafter it is organised by schools (...)
     
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  3. Mariam Attar (2010). Islamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought. Routledge.score: 174.0
    This book explores philosophical ethics in Arabo-Islamic thought.
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  4. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 168.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim (...)
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  5. Iljas Ismail (1980). Islamic Ethics and Morality. Convislam.score: 150.0
  6. Mohammed Ghaly (2014). Pre‐Modern Islamic Medical Ethics and Graeco‐Islamic‐Jewish Embryology. Bioethics 28 (2):49-58.score: 144.0
    This article examines the, hitherto comparatively unexplored, reception of Greek embryology by medieval Muslim jurists. The article elaborates on the views attributed to Hippocrates (d. ca. 375 BC), which received attention from both Muslim physicians, such as Avicenna (d. 1037), and their Jewish peers living in the Muslim world including Ibn Jumayʽ (d. ca. 1198) and Moses Maimonides (d. 1204). The religio-ethical implications of these Graeco-Islamic-Jewish embryological views were fathomed out by the two medieval Muslim jurists Shihāb al-Dīn al-Qarāfī (...)
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  7. Eddy S. Fang & Renaud Foucart (forthcoming). Western Financial Agents and Islamic Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 144.0
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  8. Najma Mohamed (2014). Islamic Education, Eco-Ethics and Community. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (3):315-328.score: 144.0
    Amid the growing coalescence between the religion and ecology movements, the voice of Muslims who care for the earth and its people is rising. While the Islamic position on the environment is not well-represented in the ecotheology discourse, it advances an environmental imaginary which shows how faith can be harnessed as a vehicle for social change. This article will draw upon doctoral research which synthesised the Islamic ecological ethic (eco-ethic) from sacred texts, traditions and contemporary thought, and illustrated (...)
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  9. Ayman Shabana (2013). Law and Ethics in Islamic Bioethics: Nonmaleficence in Islamic Paternity Regulations. Zygon 48 (3):709-731.score: 144.0
    In Islamic law paternity is treated as a consequence of a licit sexual relationship. Since DNA testing makes a clear distinction between legal and biological paternity possible, it challenges the continued correlation between paternity and marriage. This article explores the foundations of paternity regulations in the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, with a particular focus on what is termed here “the licit sex principle,” and investigates the extent to which a harm-based argument can be made either by appeal to or (...)
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  10. Rafik Issa Beekun (1997). Islamic Business Ethics. International Institute of Islamic Thought.score: 132.0
  11. Shahzad Qaiser (2009). Biomedical Ethics: Philosophical and Islamic Perspectives. Islamic Research Institute.score: 132.0
     
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  12. Mohammad Saeed, Zafar U. Ahmed & Syeda-Masooda Mukhtar (2001). International Marketing Ethics From an Islamic Perspective: A Value-Maximization Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):127 - 142.score: 126.0
    International marketing practices, embedded in a strong ethical doctrine, can play a vital role in raising the standards of business conduct worldwide, while in no way compromising the quality of services or products offered to customers, or surrendering the profit margins of businesses. Adherence to such ethical practices can help to elevate the standards of behavior and thus of living, of traders and consumers alike. Against this background, this paper endeavors to identify the salient features of the Islamic framework (...)
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  13. S. Aksoy (2010). Some Principles of Islamic Ethics as Found in Harrisian Philosophy. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (4):226-229.score: 126.0
    John Harris is one of the prominent philosophers and bioethicists of our time. He has published tens of books and hundreds of papers throughout his professional life. This paper aims to take a ‘deep-look’ at Harris' works to argue that it is possible to find some principles of Islamic ethics in Harrisian philosophy, namely in his major works, as well as in his personal life. This may be surprising, or thought of as a ‘big’ and ‘groundless’ claim, since (...)
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  14. Aasim I. Padela (2007). Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer. Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.score: 120.0
  15. Bülent Şenay (2010). Change And Changeability: Ethics Of Disagreement And Public Space In Islamic Thought. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):128-162.score: 120.0
    The paper advocates that a middle ground between the many theories attempting to explain Islam and its view on the relationship between politics and religion is provided by the textual and discursive approaches. Islamist and/or Islamic revivalist movements are essentially concerned with the relationship between religion and social reality in the context of ‘change’. Worldly politics and the hermeneutics of disagreement also essentially deal with ‘change’ and ‘public space’. What is ‘changeable’ and what is ‘unchangeable’ is a question of (...)
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  16. A. Kevin Reinhart (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life : Future Challenges. In Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.), Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.score: 120.0
  17. Bayu Taufiq Possumah, Abdul Ghafar Ismail & Shahida Shahimi (2013). Bringing Work Back in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):257-270.score: 116.0
    Religion and work are seldom discussed. The two have caused scholars to question the religion’s role with work. This paper reviews research on the integrate between religion and work by examining issues of concept, definition, measurement, and reviewing research that examines the relationship of work and religion with respect to: different times, types of people, organize human interactions and sources of knowledge. We then discuss the methodological requirement for reintegrating work studies into social institutional theory and indicate what the conceptual (...)
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  18. Gillian Rice (2006). Pro-Environmental Behavior in Egypt: Is There a Role for Islamic Environmental Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):373 - 390.score: 114.0
    Egypt, a less affluent, predominantly Muslim country, suffers from numerous forms of environmental pollution, some severe. This study investigates pro-environmental behaviors of citizens in Cairo, Egypt’s largest metropolis, and studies the relationship between pro-environmental behavior and demographic variables, beliefs, values, and religiosity. Analysis shows that three types of pro-environmental behavior are present: Public Sphere, Private Sphere, and Activist Behavior, with the latter occurring less frequently. Importantly, the study identifies an ecocentric value among respondents which is correlated with Public Sphere Behavior. (...)
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  19. Ali Rizvi (2010). Islamic Environmental Ethics and the Challenge of Anthropocentrism. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC SOCIAL SCIENCES 27 (3):53-78.score: 108.0
    Lynn White’s seminal article on the historical roots of the ecological crisis, which inspired radical environmentalism, has cast suspicion upon religion as the source of modern anthropocentrism. To pave the way for a viable Islamic environmental ethics, charges of anthropocentrism need to be faced and rebutted. Therefore, the bulk of this paper will seek to establish the non- anthropocentric credentials of Islamic thought. Islam rejects all forms of anthropocentrism by insisting upon a transcendent God who is utterly (...)
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  20. Ian S. Markham & İbrahim Özdemir (eds.) (2005). Globalization, Ethics, and Islam: The Case of Bediuzzaman Said Nursi. Ashgate Pub..score: 108.0
    Yet many in the USA and Europe are not familiar with his important work; this book seeks to rectify that gap.In Globalization, Ethics and Islam, Jewish, ...
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  21. Abbas J. Ali, Abdulrahman Al-Aali & Abdullah Al-Owaihan (2013). Islamic Perspectives on Profit Maximization. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):467-475.score: 108.0
    Ethical considerations, especially those religiously driven, play a significant role in shaping business conduct and priorities. Profit levels and earnings constitute an integral part of business considerations and are relevant and closely linked to prevailing ethics. In this paper, Islamic prescriptions on profit maximization are introduced. Islamic business ethics are outlined as well. It is suggested that while Islamic teaching treats profits as reward for engaging in vital activities necessary for serving societal interests, profit maximization (...)
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  22. John Kelsay (2007). Comparison and History in the Study of Religious Ethics: An Essay on Michael Cook's "Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought". [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):347 - 373.score: 108.0
    Qur'an 3:104 speaks of "commanding right and forbidding wrong" as a constitutive feature of the Muslim community. Michael Cook's careful and comprehensive study provides a wealth of information about the ways Muslims in various contexts have understood this notion. Cook also makes a number of comparative observations, and suggests that "commanding" appears to be a uniquely Muslim practice. Scholars of religious ethics should read Cook's study with great appreciation. They will also have a number of questions about his comparative (...)
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  23. Hossam E. Fadel (2012). Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review. Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.score: 102.0
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human (...)
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  24. Vivienne Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Islamic Fundamentalism: On the Limits of Discourse Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):153-166.score: 102.0
    Using the example of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism, and especially the writings of Sayyid Qutb, this article raises questions about discourse ethics as a mode of conflict resolution. It appears that discourse ethics is only relevant when all parties have already agreed to settle disputes deliberatively and already share the notions of rational deliberation and individual autonomy. This raises questions not only about the capability of discourse ethics to incorporate a deep plurality of worldviews, but also about (...)
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  25. M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
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  26. Tanri Abeng (1997). Business Ethics in Islamic Context. Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (3):47-54.score: 102.0
    The role of the business leader is key to develop the culture of an enterprise. To exemplify its importance in the national and globalcontext, the Muslim author from Indonesia points with admiration to Konosuke Matsushita, founder of Matsushita Electric Corporation, who already in the 1930s set up the seven ethical principles for healthy business growth, which also are commended by the Islamic imperative. Due to the current dynamic business environment, Muslims find themselves confronted with serious dilemmas and need guidance (...)
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  27. Charles E. Butterworth (1983). Ethics in Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Journal of Religious Ethics 11 (2):224 - 239.score: 102.0
    This essay focuses on three of Islam's best-known philosophers: Farabi, Avicenna, and Averroes. It sets forth and compares their ethical teaching on the following basic issues: (1) the relation of philosophy to religion, (2) the communal basis of ethics and the comcomitant role of statecraft, and (3) some specific charac- teristics of their ethical teaching. Throughout the essay the close connection of medieval Islamic with classical Greek philosophy is noted.
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  28. V. Rispler-Chaim (1989). Islamic Medical Ethics in the 20th Century. Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (4):203-208.score: 102.0
    While the practice of Western medicine is known today to doctors of all ethnic and religious groups, its standards are subject to the availability of resources. The medical ethics guiding each doctor is influenced by his/her religious or cultural background or affiliation, and that is where diversity exists. Much has been written about Jewish and Christian medical ethics. Islamic medical ethics has never been discussed as an independent field of ethics, although several selected topics, especially (...)
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  29. Mona Siddiqui (2012). The Good Muslim: Reflections on Classical Islamic Law and Theology. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Spoken, intended and problematic divorce in Hanafi Fiqh; 2. Between person and property - slavery in Qudūrī's Mukhtasar; 3. Pig, purity and permission in Mālikī slaughter; 4. Islamic and other perspectives on evil; 5. The language of love in the Qur'ān; 6. Virtue and limits in the ethics of friendship 7. Drinking and drunkenness in Ibn Rushd.
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  30. Jonathan E. Brockopp (ed.) (2003). Islamic Ethics of Life: Abortion, War, and Euthanasia. University of South Carolina Press.score: 100.0
    o ne -taking -Life ana Oavmg .Life The Islamic Context Jonathan E. Brockopp The great ethicists of the western world, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, and others, ...
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  31. Abdulaziz Abdulhussein Sachedina (2009). Islamic Biomedical Ethics: Principles and Application. Oxford University Press.score: 98.0
    In search of principles of health care in Islam -- Health and suffering -- Beginning of life -- Terminating early life -- Death and dying -- Organ donation and cosmetic enhancement -- Recent developments -- Epilogue.
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  32. Constant J. Mews & Ibrahim Abraham (2007). Usury and Just Compensation: Religious and Financial Ethics in Historical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):1 - 15.score: 96.0
    Usury is a concept often associated more with religiously based financial ethics, whether Christian or Islamic, than with the secular world of contemporary finance. The problem is compounded by a tendency to interpret riba, prohibited within Islam, as both usury and interest, without adequately distinguishing these concepts. This paper argues that in Christian tradition usury has always evoked the notion of money demanded in excess of what is owed on a loan, disrupting a relationship of equality between people, (...)
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  33. Irene Oh (2008). Approaching Islam: Comparative Ethics Through Human Rights. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):405-423.score: 96.0
    A dialogical approach to understanding Islamic ethics rejects objectivist methods in favor of a conversational model in which participants accept each other as rational moral agents. Hans-Georg Gadamer asserts the importance of agreement upon a subject matter through conversation as a means to gaining insight into other persons and cultures, and Jürgen Habermas stresses the importance of fairness in dialogue. Using human rights as a subject matter for engaging in dialogue with Islamic scholars, Muslim perspectives on issues (...)
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  34. Dale Maurice Riepe (1988). Book Review:Reason and Tradition in Islamic Ethics. George Hourani. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (3):588-.score: 96.0
  35. Safei El-Deen Hamed (1993). Seeing the Environment Through Islamic Eyes: Application Ofshariah to Natural Resources Planning and Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (2):145-164.score: 96.0
    A comprehensive paradigm of environmental ethics should encompass two things: (1) a particular way of life, and (2) a path to achieve that ideal. An effective paradigm must also be internally consistent, yet externally workable in the real world. On the whole, the modern environmental movement has failed to provide these essential components and qualities in its associated philosophies, most of which suffer from being too abstract or too utopian.This paper suggests that Islam, as a religion and as a (...)
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  36. Jamal A. Badawi (2001). Islamic Business Ethics. Spiritual Goods 2001:295-323.score: 96.0
    This essay focuses on the normative teachings of Islam. Justice, honesty, and public welfare are the pillars of Islamic business ethics. These values have two major roots: (1) belief in and devotion to Allah (God), and (2) the earthly trusteeship that grounds moral accountability. The business values of productivity, hard work, and excellence are encouraged. However, at the heart of various injunctions relating to business transactions are the imperatives of lawfulness, honesty, and fair play. Products or services must (...)
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  37. M. K. Banu Az-Zubair (2007). Who is a Parent? Parenthood in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):605-609.score: 96.0
  38. Aasim I. Padela, Steven W. Furber, Mohammad A. Kholwadia & Ebrahim Moosa (2014). Dire Necessity and Transformation: Entry‐Points for Modern Science in Islamic Bioethical Assessment of Porcine Products in Vaccines. Bioethics 28 (2):59-66.score: 96.0
    The field of medicine provides an important window through which to examine the encounters between religion and science, and between modernity and tradition. While both religion and science consider health to be a ‘good’ that is to be preserved, and promoted, religious and science-based teachings may differ in their conception of what constitutes good health, and how that health is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the way the Islamic ethico-legal tradition assesses the permissibility of using vaccines that contain (...)
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  39. A. Kevin Reinhart (2005). Origins of Islamic Ethics: Foundations and Constructions. In William Schweiker (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Religious Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 244--253.score: 96.0
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  40. Jeffrey Stout (2005). Comments on Six Responses to Democracy and Tradition. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):709-744.score: 96.0
    This paper is a rejoinder to papers by Sabina Lovibond, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Sumner B. Twiss, G. Scott Davis, M. Cathleen Kaveny, and John Kelsay on the author's recent book "Democracy and Tradition". The argument covers a host of topics, ranging from epistemology and methodology to human rights, the common law, and Islamic ethics.
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  41. Salam Abdallah (2010). Islamic Ethics: An Exposition for Resolving ICT Ethical Dilemmas. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 8 (3):289-301.score: 96.0
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  42. Abbas J. Ali & Abdulrahman Al-Aali (forthcoming). Marketing and Ethics: What Islamic Ethics Have Contributed and the Challenges Ahead. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 96.0
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  43. Othman Alhabshi & Mustapha bin Hj Nik Hassan (eds.) (1998). Islam, Knowledge, and Ethics: A Pertinent Culture for Managing Organisations. Institute of Islamic Understanding Malaysia.score: 96.0
     
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  44. Ismaʼil R. al Faruqi (1989). Islamic Ethics. In S. Cromwell Crawford (ed.), World Religions and Global Ethics. Paragon House Publishers.score: 96.0
     
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  45. Sohail H. Hashmi (2004). Islamic Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: An Argument for Nonproliferation. In Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.), Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press. 321--352.score: 96.0
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  46. M. Kabir (2007). Who is a Parent? Parenthood in Islamic Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):605.score: 96.0
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  47. Fahri Karakas, Emine Sarigollu & Mustafa Kavas (forthcoming). Discourses of Collective Spirituality and Turkish Islamic Ethics: An Inquiry Into Transcendence, Connectedness, and Virtuousness in Anatolian Tigers. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 96.0
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  48. John Kelsay (2013). Islamic Ethics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 96.0
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  49. Ali Ünal (2009). Living the Ethics and Morality of Islam. Tughra Books.score: 96.0
     
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