Search results for 'Islamic fundamentalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vivienne Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Islamic Fundamentalism: On the Limits of Discourse Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):153-166.score: 180.0
    Using the example of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism, and especially the writings of Sayyid Qutb, this article raises questions about discourse ethics as a mode of conflict resolution. It appears that discourse ethics is only relevant when all parties have already agreed to settle disputes deliberatively and already share the notions of rational deliberation and individual autonomy. This raises questions not only about the capability of discourse ethics to incorporate a deep plurality of worldviews, but also about its capability (...)
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  2. Donald K. Sharpes (1987). An Inquiry Into the Values of Islamic Fundamentalism. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (4):309-315.score: 150.0
  3. J. N. Pieterse (1996). A Severe Case of Dichotomic Thinking: Bassam Tibi on Islamic Fundamentalism. Theory, Culture and Society 13 (4):123-126.score: 150.0
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  4. Mariam Attar (2010). Islamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought. Routledge.score: 96.0
    This book explores philosophical ethics in Arabo-Islamic thought.
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  5. Jakobus Martinus Vorster (2010). Analytical Perspectives on Religious Fundamentalism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (17):5-20.score: 96.0
    The first decade of the twenty-first century will amongst other things be remembered for the renewed interest in religious fundamentalism. In the past fundamentalism was related to a certain strand in the Christian Protestant tradition in the USA, but nowadays the term is used for a resurging complex ideol- ogy world-wide. Religious fundamentalism, and even religions themselves, indeed became a focal point of attention. Furthermore, the question arises of how to deal with this phenomenon in a Liberal (...)
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  6. Oliver Roy (1985). Fundamentalism, Traditionalism, and Islam. Telos 1985 (65):122-127.score: 84.0
    Obscurantism, return of the Middle Ages, fascism, clericalism …. Utter nonsense has been written on the return of religion in the Muslem world, reflecting the old Western phantasm about Islam. In fact, the phenomena grouped under the rubric of “fundamentalism” are quite heterogenous and belong to different catagories, of which only one — Islamicism — is really new. Islamic revivalism must be understood not in terms of recent Western history, emphasizing the emergence of the modern state from the (...)
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  7. A. C. Besley (2013). Philosophy, Education and the Corruption of Youth—From Socrates to Islamic Extremists. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):6-19.score: 64.0
    Following Aristotle?s description of youth and brief discussion about indoctrination and parrhesia, the article historicizes Socrates? trial as the intersection of philosophy, education and a teacher?s influence on youth. It explores the historic-political context and how contemporary Athenians might have viewed Socrates and his student?s actions, whereby his teachings were implicated in three coups led by his former students against Athenian democracy, for or which he accepted little or no responsibility. Socrates appears subversively anti-democratic. This provides grounds that challenge the (...)
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  8. Carlos del Ama (2007). Toward a New World Order. Authorhouse.score: 60.0
    On examining the identity, reason and mission of the European Union this book contributes to eliminating the ideological deficit, which is still argued and ...
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  9. Ahmet Çiğdem (2006). On “Islamic Terrorism” A Reply to Pellicani. Telos 2006 (134):161-167.score: 60.0
    The concepts of “Islamic Fundamentalism” and “Islamic Terrorism” are the usual suspects in the present political reality and discourse. After the tragic events in New York, Madrid, Istanbul, and London, one has every reason to think that Islam is somehow a part of the problem. But in terms of the issues that we currently face, we must be careful to distinguish between understanding and the creation of scapegoats. There is no doubt that a terrorist act is unjustifiable, (...)
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  10. Carlos Amdela (2007). Toward a New World Order. Authorhouse.score: 60.0
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  11. Mohammed Arkoun (2002). The Unthought in Contemporary Islamic Thought. Saqi.score: 58.0
    Mohammed Arkoun is one of the Muslim world's foremost thinkers. His efforts to liberate Islamic history from dogmatic constructs have led him to a radical review of traditional history. Drawing on a combination of pertinent disciplines ? history, sociology, psychology and anthropology ? his approach subjects every system of belief and non-belief, every tradition of exegesis, theology and jurisprudence to a critique aimed at liberating reason from the grip of dogmatic postulates. By treating Islam as a religion as well (...)
     
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  12. James Mensch, The Hermeneutics of Fundamentalism.score: 54.0
    No one can turn on the news these days without hearing of fundamentalism. Christian fundamentalists form the fastest growing sect in the United States and are arguably the most politically potent. Both the president and vice-president, as well as prominent members of the Cabinet call themselves “fundamentalists.” In the Islamic world, fundamentalism has an equal currency. Everywhere ascendant, it has, since September 11th, become linked to terrorist attacks and the actions of suicide bombers. Among the Jews of (...)
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  13. Geoffrey Partington (1990). Moral Education in Some English‐Speaking Societies: Antinomian and Fundamentalist Challenges. Journal of Moral Education 19 (3):182-191.score: 54.0
    Abstract Three distinctive coalitions are distinguished in the field of moral education in Britain and comparable countries. The first of these, the ?civil religion? of government school systems during the late nineteenth and most of the twentieth century has been undermined since the late 1960s by antinomianism, the second coalition. One result has been an increasing flight in the United States and Australia of Protestant Fundamentalists, part of the third coalition, from government schools. During the same period large numbers of (...)
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  14. B. Tibi (1995). Culture and Knowledge: The Politics of Islamization of Knowledge as a Postmodern Project? The Fundamentalist Claim to De-Westernization. Theory, Culture and Society 12 (1):1-24.score: 50.0
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  15. Therese Vassarotti (2011). Women and Fundamentalism in Islam and Catholicism: Negotiating Modernity in a Globalised World [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (4):500.score: 50.0
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  16. Shoham Shlomo Giora (2004). The 21 st Century "kultur Kampf": Fundamentalist Islam Against Occidental Cutlure. Filosofia Oggi 27 (105):65-100.score: 50.0
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  17. Tamara Albertini (2003). The Seductiveness of Certainty: The Destruction of Islam's Intellectual Legacy by the Fundamentalists. Philosophy East and West 53 (4):455-470.score: 48.0
    : This essay highlights how contemporary Muslim fundamentalists reduce Islam's rich and complex intellectual legacy to a set of authoritarian rules. The three branches of classical Islamic education-theology, jurisprudence, and ethics-are particularly targeted. The reductionist pattern applied to these areas is designed to eliminate both the scholarly space of inquiry and the room for individual reflection traditionally granted to its followers by Islamic religion. The essay ends with an analysis of the language used by Osama bin Laden in (...)
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  18. Nur Serter (2010). Dinde Siyasal İslam Tekeli. Derin Yayınları.score: 48.0
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  19. John Walbridge (2010). God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 46.0
    This book investigates the central role of reason in Islamic intellectual life. Despite widespread characterization of Islam as a system of belief based only on revelation, John Walbridge argues that rational methods, not fundamentalism, have characterized Islamic law, philosophy and education since the medieval period. His research demonstrates that this medieval Islamic rational tradition was opposed by both modernists and fundamentalists, resulting in a general collapse of traditional Islamic intellectual life and its replacement by more (...)
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  20. Saïd Amir Arjomand (2004). Islam, Political Change and Globalization. Thesis Eleven 76 (1):9-28.score: 40.0
    This article examines the ways in which Islamic civilization has faced the challenges of the modern age and of globalization. The expansion of Islam in world history is itself a global or proto-global process with its own distinctive internal dynamics. The main challenge to modern Islam, coming from the global political culture in the form of constitutionalism and democratization and human rights, has set in motion a civilizational encounter that has significantly altered the politico-religious dynamics of the proto-global, pre-modern (...)
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  21. Barkley Rosser, Islam and Mammon: The Economic Predicaments of Islamism. Timur Kuran, 2004\, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 194 Pages, Index, $28.00. [REVIEW]score: 40.0
    Although Bernard Lewis is a deeper scholar of Islamic history, and the late Charles Issawi was a greater scholar of the economic history of Muslim societies, Timur Kuran has emerged in the last decade and a half as the leading scholar in the world of the rising field of Islamic economics. While most who study this field are advocates of Islamic economics as a superior system for Muslim societies, and possibly for all societies, Kuran has been (...)
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  22. Laith Al-Saud (2005). Sayyid Quṭb as an Illuminationist and Existentialist Rather Than a “Fundamentalist”. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 1 (1):101-117.score: 36.0
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  23. Yossi Dahan & Gal Levy (2000). Multicultural Education in the Zionist State €“ The Mizrahi Challenge. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):423-444.score: 36.0
    In this paper, we explore a specific variant of multicultural education inIsrael that developed within the dominant Jewish cultural identity, that isthe claim of Jews from Islamic countries (Mizrahi Jews) for educational autonomy. This demand arose against the backdrop of an aggressive nationalist ideology – Zionism – that claimed torepresent all Jews, and yet was too ambivalent toward its non-European Jewish subjects. The Mizrahi Jews' dual identity, as Jews and as products of the Arab culture, conflated with the state's (...)
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  24. Erik Baldwin (2012). Religious Dogma Without Religious Fundamentalism. Journal of Social Science 8 (1):85-90.score: 34.0
    New Atheists and Anti-Theists (such as Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, Christopher Hutchins) affirm that there is a strong connection between being a traditional theist and being a religious fundamentalist who advocates violence, terrorism, and war. They are especially critical of Islam. On the contrary, I argue that, when correctly understood, religious dogmatic belief, present in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, is progressive and open to internal and external criticism and revision. Moreover, acknowledging that human knowledge is finite and that (...)
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  25. Kyle Wallace (2011). Turkish Politics: Between Europe and Islam. Constellations 2 (2):108-117.score: 34.0
    Since the inception of Turkey as an independent state, the country has based itself on Western modes of governance, with secularism being a hallmark of the nation. In recent years, Islamic parties have made inroads in government, causing consternation among the old guard and allies in Europe. Much of the modern arguments against Turkey's inclusion in the EU rely on psuedo-Orientalist ideas; Turkey is somehow so different and alien from "European" culture that they simply do not belong in the (...)
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  26. V. N. Konovalov (2008). Tolerance/Intolerance in Context of Global Processes. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:391-398.score: 30.0
    Specific character of globalization can be understood only in connection with deep crisis of the nation-state and thus with sovereignty. The sovereignty organically includes territory. During globalization territory factor is not anymore the key principle of social and cultural life. Such phenomenon as Islamic fundamentalism (Islamism) fits quite well the structure of the theory of globalization in postmodernist interpretation. For Islamism as a subject of the world order the determining identity (as sets of the ontological aims determining its (...)
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  27. Peter King, Democracy and Anti-Democrats.score: 30.0
    Over the last few years, events in countries like Algeria, whose free democratic elections were cancelled by army officers to prevent a probable Islamic fundamentalist victory, have drawn attention to a number of issues that are in urgent need of consideration. Apart from the fact that the political reverberations of the Algerian incident are still being felt throughout the region, the fact that it happened helped to focus attention on a thorny problem for democrats everywhere. Many people have found (...)
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  28. V. Kaul (2012). 'Can Muslims Be Suicide Bombers?' An Essay on the Troubles of Multiculturalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (4-5):389-398.score: 30.0
    Is a Muslim still a Muslim when he crashes airplanes into the twin towers? Any serious theory of multiculturalism has to deny that Islam could ever come to justify suicide bombing and terrorism. My thesis is that none of the contemporary multicultural theories manages to do so, or at least not without collapsing into a Kantian conception of personal autonomy and, consequently, into some standard version of liberalism. Communitarianism, trying to demonstrate that fundamentalism has nothing to do with the (...)
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  29. Vivienne Matthies-Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Bush's Neoconservatives: Too Close for Comfort? Studies in Social Justice 5 (2):167-182.score: 30.0
    In his recent political writings, Habermas has opposed his cosmopolitan project to that of the Bushite neoconservatives. However, this article argues that in some respects Habermas's works come closer to the neoconservative agenda than he realizes and that this poses a potential danger of its being appropriated by precisely the camp he opposes. These problems particularly come to the fore in his analysis of Islamic fundamentalism, democracy and the Middle East, but also in his recommendations concerning UN-based internationalism (...)
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  30. Mark R. Reiff (2007). The Attack on Liberalism. In Michael D. A. Freeman & Ross Harrison (eds.), Law and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Liberalism is today under attack. This attack is being fought along two fronts, and so appears to be coming from different directions, but it is actually coming exclusively from the right. One source is Islamic fundamentalism, and the other is American neo-conservatism, which in turn unites elements of Christian fundamentalism with elements of neo-Platonic political philosophy and neo-Aristotelian moral theory. Both Islamic fundamentalism and American neo-conservatism are perfectionist views, and while perfectionist attacks on liberalism are (...)
     
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  31. Gayil Talshir, Mathew Humphrey & Michael Freeden (eds.) (2006). Taking Ideology Seriously: 21st Century Reconfigurations. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Recent years have witnessed a resurgence of the "end of ideology" thesis, not as a theoretical stance but as a reaction to what appears to have been the decline of major ideological families, such as socialism, in a changing world order. Globalization, as well as internal national fragmentation of belief systems, have made it difficult to identify ideology in its conventional formats. This volume challenges the notion that we are living in a post-ideological age. It offers a theoretical framework for (...)
     
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  32. Domenic Marbaniang (2011). Religious Fundamentalism and Social Order: A Philosophical Perspective. In Religious Fundamentalism. Domenic Marbaniang.score: 27.0
    Forty four years after the publication of Harvey Cox‟s The Secular City that celebrated “the progressive secularization of the world as the logical outcome of Biblical religion” (Newsweek)1, we almost feel the bones of religious fundamentalism cracking under the pressure of secularization. At the same time, however, the Hegelian dialectic holds ground as both refuse to be crushed by either; and any compromising stance only begets another rival; to the effect, that it can be said that fundamentalism is (...)
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  33. Erik Baldwin (2010). On the Prospects of an Islamic Externalist Account of Warrant. In Tymieniecka Anna-Teresa & Muhtaroglu Nazif (eds.), Classic Issues in Islamic Philosophy and Theology Today (Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology in Dialogue, vol. 4. Springer.score: 27.0
    Alvin Plantinga’s externalist religious epistemology, which incorporates a proper function account of warrant, forms the basis for his standard and extended Aquinas/Calvin models. Respectively, these models show how it could be that Theistic Belief and Christian Belief could be warranted for believers in a properly basic manner. Christianity and Islam share fundamental theses that underlie the plausibility of Plantinga’s models: the Dependency Thesis, the Design Thesis, and the Immediacy Thesis. Accordingly, an Islamic worldview can endorse the truth of the (...)
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  34. Martyn Oliver (2007). Review of R. Michael Feener, Islam in World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (3):317-319.score: 26.0
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  35. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 24.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim cultures. The case (...)
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  36. Ali Rizvi, A Critique of Modern Philosophy and Plea for Philosophy in Islamic Culture.score: 24.0
    In this paper I make a case for a genuine and legitimate role for philosophy in modern Islamic culture. However, I argue that in order to make any progress towards reinstating such philosophical activity, we need to look deep into the nature and essence of modern philosophy. In this paper I aim to do this precisely by challenging modern philosophy’s self conception as an absolute critique (i.e. a critique of everything/anything). I argue that such a conception is not only (...)
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  37. Helen Steward (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Irrelevance of Physics: Fischer's Semi-Compatibilism Vs. Anti-Fundamentalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):129 - 145.score: 24.0
    The paper argues that it is possible for an incompatibilist to accept John Martin Fischer’s plausible insistence that the question whether we are morally responsible agents ought not to depend on whether the laws of physics turn out to be deterministic or merely probabilistic. The incompatibilist should do so by rejecting the fundamentalism which entails that the question whether determinism is true is a question merely about the nature of the basic physical laws. It is argued that this is (...)
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  38. Mehmet Karabela (2011). The Development of Dialectic and Argumentation Theory in Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History. Dissertation, McGill Universityscore: 24.0
    This dissertation is an analysis of the development of dialectic and argumentation theory in post-classical Islamic intellectual history. The central concerns of the thesis are; treatises on the theoretical understanding of the concept of dialectic and argumentation theory, and how, in practice, the concept of dialectic, as expressed in the Greek classical tradition, was received and used by five communities in the Islamic intellectual camp. It shows how dialectic as an argumentative discourse diffused into five communities (theologicians, poets, (...)
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  39. Farshad Sadri (2010). How Early Muslim Scholars Assimilated Aristotle and Made Iran the Intellectual Center of the Islamic World: A Study of Falsafah. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 24.0
    This work demonstrates how falsafah (which linguistically refers to a group of commentaries by Muslim scholars associated with their readings of "The Corpus Aristotelicum") in Iran has been always closely linked with religion. It demonstrates that the blending of the new natural theology with Iranian culture created an intellectual climate that made Iran the center of falsafah in the Medieval world. The author begins this book by exploring the analytical arguments and methodologies presented as the subject of the first-philosophy (metaphysics) (...)
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  40. William C. Chittick (2001). The Heart of Islamic Philosophy: The Quest for Self-Knowledge in the Teachings of Afḍal Al-Dīn Kāshānī. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book introduces the work of an important medieval Islamic philosopher who is little known outside the Persian world. Afdal al-Din Kashani was a contemporary of a number of important Muslim thinkers, including Averroes and Ibn al-Arabi. Kashani did not write for advanced students of philosophy but rather for beginners. In the main body of his work, he offers especially clear and insightful expositions of various philosophical positions, making him an invaluable resource for those who would like to learn (...)
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  41. Hossam E. Fadel (2012). Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review. Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.score: 24.0
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human (...)
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  42. Mehmet Karabela (2013). Between Jadal and Burhān: Reading Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History Through Ibn Ṭufeyl’s Novel Ḥayy B. Yaḳẓān. JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY OF ANKARA UNIVERSITY 54 (2):77-93.score: 24.0
    This article opens a new discussion in the field of post-classical Islamic intellectual history by showing how literature and intellectual history are two inseparable and interdependent fields through an analysis of Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel, Ḥayy b. Yaqẓān. To this end, the article first examines the tension between the two concepts of jadal and burhān, which have affected much of the currents in classical Islamic intellectual history, and does so by assessing the three main figures in Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel: (...)
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  43. Seyyed Hossein Nasr & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (1996). History of Islamic Philosophy. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Islamic Philosophy has often been treated as mainly of historical interest, belonging to the history of ideas rather than to philosophy. This is volume challenges this belief. The Routledge History of Philosophy is made up entirely of essays by a distinguished list of writers. They provide detailed discussions of the most important thinkers and the key concepts in Islamic philosophy, from earliest times to the present day. Fifty authors from over sixteen countries have contributed to this volume. Each (...)
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  44. M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
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  45. J. I. Laliwala (2005). Islamic Philosophy of Religion: Synthesis of Science Religion and Philosophy. Sarup & Sons.score: 24.0
    Definition and Meaning of the Islamic Philosophy of Religion Difference between Islamic Philosophy and Muslim Philosophy There is a difference between ...
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  46. Yahya Yasrebi (2007). A Critique of Causality in Islamic Philosophy. Topoi 26 (2):255-265.score: 24.0
    After the problems of epistemology, the most fundamental problem of Islamic philosophy is that of causality. Causality has been studied from various perspectives. This paper endeavors first to analyze the issues of causality in Islamic philosophy and then to critique them. A sketch is provided of the history of the development of theories of causality in Islamic philosophy, with particular attention to how religious considerations came to determine the shape of the philosophical theories that were accepted. It (...)
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  47. Roszaini Haniffa & Mohammad Hudaib (2007). Exploring the Ethical Identity of Islamic Banks Via Communication in Annual Reports. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):97 - 116.score: 24.0
    Islamic Banks (IBs) are considered as having ethical identity, since the foundation of their business philosophy is closely tied to religion. In this article, we explore whether any discrepancy exists between the communicated (based on information disclosed in the annual reports) and ideal (disclosure of information deemed vital based on the Islamic ethical business framework) ethical identities and we measure this by what we have termed the Ethical Identity Index (EII). Our longitudinal survey results over a 3-year period (...)
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  48. Oliver Leaman (2009). Islamic Philosophy: An Introduction. Polity.score: 24.0
    The new edition of Islamic Philosophy will continue to be essential reading for students and scholars of the subject, as well as anyone wanting to learn more ...
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  49. Nerina Rustomji (2008). The Garden and the Fire: Heaven and Hell in Islamic Culture. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
    The garden, the fire, and Islamic origins -- Visions of the afterworld -- Material culture and an Islamic ethic -- Other worldly landscapes and earthly realities -- Humanity, servants, and companions -- Individualized gardens and expanding fires -- Legacy of gardens -- Epilogue.
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