Search results for 'Islamic fundamentalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Vivienne Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Islamic Fundamentalism: On the Limits of Discourse Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):153-166.score: 60.0
    Using the example of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism, and especially the writings of Sayyid Qutb, this article raises questions about discourse ethics as a mode of conflict resolution. It appears that discourse ethics is only relevant when all parties have already agreed to settle disputes deliberatively and already share the notions of rational deliberation and individual autonomy. This raises questions not only about the capability of discourse ethics to incorporate a deep plurality of worldviews, but also about its capability (...)
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  2. Donald K. Sharpes (1987). An Inquiry Into the Values of Islamic Fundamentalism. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (4):309-315.score: 45.0
  3. J. N. Pieterse (1996). A Severe Case of Dichotomic Thinking: Bassam Tibi on Islamic Fundamentalism. Theory, Culture and Society 13 (4):123-126.score: 45.0
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  4. Mariam Attar (2010). Islamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought. Routledge.score: 42.0
    This book explores philosophical ethics in Arabo-Islamic thought.
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  5. Jakobus Martinus Vorster (2010). Analytical Perspectives on Religious Fundamentalism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (17):5-20.score: 42.0
    The first decade of the twenty-first century will amongst other things be remembered for the renewed interest in religious fundamentalism. In the past fundamentalism was related to a certain strand in the Christian Protestant tradition in the USA, but nowadays the term is used for a resurging complex ideol- ogy world-wide. Religious fundamentalism, and even religions themselves, indeed became a focal point of attention. Furthermore, the question arises of how to deal with this phenomenon in a Liberal (...)
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  6. Carlos del Ama (2007). Toward a New World Order. Authorhouse.score: 30.0
    On examining the identity, reason and mission of the European Union this book contributes to eliminating the ideological deficit, which is still argued and ...
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  7. Oliver Roy (1985). Fundamentalism, Traditionalism, and Islam. Telos 1985 (65):122-127.score: 30.0
    Obscurantism, return of the Middle Ages, fascism, clericalism …. Utter nonsense has been written on the return of religion in the Muslem world, reflecting the old Western phantasm about Islam. In fact, the phenomena grouped under the rubric of “fundamentalism” are quite heterogenous and belong to different catagories, of which only one — Islamicism — is really new. Islamic revivalism must be understood not in terms of recent Western history, emphasizing the emergence of the modern state from the (...)
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  8. Carlos Amdela (2007). Toward a New World Order. Authorhouse.score: 30.0
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  9. A. C. Besley (2013). Philosophy, Education and the Corruption of Youth—From Socrates to Islamic Extremists. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):6-19.score: 26.0
    Following Aristotle?s description of youth and brief discussion about indoctrination and parrhesia, the article historicizes Socrates? trial as the intersection of philosophy, education and a teacher?s influence on youth. It explores the historic-political context and how contemporary Athenians might have viewed Socrates and his student?s actions, whereby his teachings were implicated in three coups led by his former students against Athenian democracy, for or which he accepted little or no responsibility. Socrates appears subversively anti-democratic. This provides grounds that challenge the (...)
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  10. Ahmet Çiğdem (2006). On “Islamic Terrorism” A Reply to Pellicani. Telos 2006 (134):161-167.score: 24.0
    The concepts of “Islamic Fundamentalism” and “Islamic Terrorism” are the usual suspects in the present political reality and discourse. After the tragic events in New York, Madrid, Istanbul, and London, one has every reason to think that Islam is somehow a part of the problem. But in terms of the issues that we currently face, we must be careful to distinguish between understanding and the creation of scapegoats. There is no doubt that a terrorist act is unjustifiable, (...)
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  11. Nur Serter (2010). Dinde Siyasal İslam Tekeli. Derin Yayınları.score: 24.0
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  12. Mohammed Arkoun (2002). The Unthought in Contemporary Islamic Thought. Saqi.score: 23.0
    Mohammed Arkoun is one of the Muslim world's foremost thinkers. His efforts to liberate Islamic history from dogmatic constructs have led him to a radical review of traditional history. Drawing on a combination of pertinent disciplines ? history, sociology, psychology and anthropology ? his approach subjects every system of belief and non-belief, every tradition of exegesis, theology and jurisprudence to a critique aimed at liberating reason from the grip of dogmatic postulates. By treating Islam as a religion as well (...)
     
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  13. Domenic Marbaniang (2011). Religious Fundamentalism and Social Order: A Philosophical Perspective. In Religious Fundamentalism. Domenic Marbaniang.score: 21.0
    Forty four years after the publication of Harvey Cox‟s The Secular City that celebrated “the progressive secularization of the world as the logical outcome of Biblical religion” (Newsweek)1, we almost feel the bones of religious fundamentalism cracking under the pressure of secularization. At the same time, however, the Hegelian dialectic holds ground as both refuse to be crushed by either; and any compromising stance only begets another rival; to the effect, that it can be said that fundamentalism is (...)
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  14. John Walbridge (2010). God and Logic in Islam: The Caliphate of Reason. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    This book investigates the central role of reason in Islamic intellectual life. Despite widespread characterization of Islam as a system of belief based only on revelation, John Walbridge argues that rational methods, not fundamentalism, have characterized Islamic law, philosophy and education since the medieval period. His research demonstrates that this medieval Islamic rational tradition was opposed by both modernists and fundamentalists, resulting in a general collapse of traditional Islamic intellectual life and its replacement by more (...)
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  15. James Mensch, The Hermeneutics of Fundamentalism.score: 21.0
    No one can turn on the news these days without hearing of fundamentalism. Christian fundamentalists form the fastest growing sect in the United States and are arguably the most politically potent. Both the president and vice-president, as well as prominent members of the Cabinet call themselves “fundamentalists.” In the Islamic world, fundamentalism has an equal currency. Everywhere ascendant, it has, since September 11th, become linked to terrorist attacks and the actions of suicide bombers. Among the Jews of (...)
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  16. Geoffrey Partington (1990). Moral Education in Some English‐Speaking Societies: Antinomian and Fundamentalist Challenges. Journal of Moral Education 19 (3):182-191.score: 21.0
    Abstract Three distinctive coalitions are distinguished in the field of moral education in Britain and comparable countries. The first of these, the ?civil religion? of government school systems during the late nineteenth and most of the twentieth century has been undermined since the late 1960s by antinomianism, the second coalition. One result has been an increasing flight in the United States and Australia of Protestant Fundamentalists, part of the third coalition, from government schools. During the same period large numbers of (...)
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  17. Erik Baldwin (2010). On the Prospects of an Islamic Externalist Account of Warrant. In Tymieniecka Anna-Teresa & Muhtaroglu Nazif (eds.), Classic Issues in Islamic Philosophy and Theology Today (Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology in Dialogue, vol. 4. Springer.score: 21.0
    Alvin Plantinga’s externalist religious epistemology, which incorporates a proper function account of warrant, forms the basis for his standard and extended Aquinas/Calvin models. Respectively, these models show how it could be that Theistic Belief and Christian Belief could be warranted for believers in a properly basic manner. Christianity and Islam share fundamental theses that underlie the plausibility of Plantinga’s models: the Dependency Thesis, the Design Thesis, and the Immediacy Thesis. Accordingly, an Islamic worldview can endorse the truth of the (...)
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  18. Gillian Rice (1999). Islamic Ethics and the Implications for Business. Journal of Business Ethics 18 (4):345 - 358.score: 18.0
    As global business operations expand, managers need more knowledge of foreign cultures, in particular, information on the ethics of doing business across borders. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to share the Islamic perspective on business ethics, little known in the west, which may stimulate further thinking and debate on the relationships between ethics and business, and (2) to provide some knowledge of Islamic philosophy in order to help managers do business in Muslim cultures. The case (...)
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  19. Ali Rizvi, A Critique of Modern Philosophy and Plea for Philosophy in Islamic Culture.score: 18.0
    In this paper I make a case for a genuine and legitimate role for philosophy in modern Islamic culture. However, I argue that in order to make any progress towards reinstating such philosophical activity, we need to look deep into the nature and essence of modern philosophy. In this paper I aim to do this precisely by challenging modern philosophy’s self conception as an absolute critique (i.e. a critique of everything/anything). I argue that such a conception is not only (...)
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  20. Helen Steward (2008). Moral Responsibility and the Irrelevance of Physics: Fischer's Semi-Compatibilism Vs. Anti-Fundamentalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):129 - 145.score: 18.0
    The paper argues that it is possible for an incompatibilist to accept John Martin Fischer’s plausible insistence that the question whether we are morally responsible agents ought not to depend on whether the laws of physics turn out to be deterministic or merely probabilistic. The incompatibilist should do so by rejecting the fundamentalism which entails that the question whether determinism is true is a question merely about the nature of the basic physical laws. It is argued that this is (...)
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  21. Mehmet Karabela (2011). The Development of Dialectic and Argumentation Theory in Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History. Dissertation, McGill Universityscore: 18.0
    This dissertation is an analysis of the development of dialectic and argumentation theory in post-classical Islamic intellectual history. The central concerns of the thesis are; treatises on the theoretical understanding of the concept of dialectic and argumentation theory, and how, in practice, the concept of dialectic, as expressed in the Greek classical tradition, was received and used by five communities in the Islamic intellectual camp. It shows how dialectic as an argumentative discourse diffused into five communities (theologicians, poets, (...)
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  22. Farshad Sadri (2010). How Early Muslim Scholars Assimilated Aristotle and Made Iran the Intellectual Center of the Islamic World: A Study of Falsafah. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 18.0
    This work demonstrates how falsafah (which linguistically refers to a group of commentaries by Muslim scholars associated with their readings of "The Corpus Aristotelicum") in Iran has been always closely linked with religion. It demonstrates that the blending of the new natural theology with Iranian culture created an intellectual climate that made Iran the center of falsafah in the Medieval world. The author begins this book by exploring the analytical arguments and methodologies presented as the subject of the first-philosophy (metaphysics) (...)
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  23. William C. Chittick (2001). The Heart of Islamic Philosophy: The Quest for Self-Knowledge in the Teachings of Afḍal Al-Dīn Kāshānī. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book introduces the work of an important medieval Islamic philosopher who is little known outside the Persian world. Afdal al-Din Kashani was a contemporary of a number of important Muslim thinkers, including Averroes and Ibn al-Arabi. Kashani did not write for advanced students of philosophy but rather for beginners. In the main body of his work, he offers especially clear and insightful expositions of various philosophical positions, making him an invaluable resource for those who would like to learn (...)
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  24. Hossam E. Fadel (2012). Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review. Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.score: 18.0
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human (...)
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  25. Seyyed Hossein Nasr & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (1996). History of Islamic Philosophy. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Islamic Philosophy has often been treated as mainly of historical interest, belonging to the history of ideas rather than to philosophy. This is volume challenges this belief. The Routledge History of Philosophy is made up entirely of essays by a distinguished list of writers. They provide detailed discussions of the most important thinkers and the key concepts in Islamic philosophy, from earliest times to the present day. Fifty authors from over sixteen countries have contributed to this volume. Each (...)
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  26. Mehmet Karabela (2013). Between Jadal and Burhān: Reading Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History Through Ibn Ṭufeyl’s Novel Ḥayy B. Yaḳẓān. JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY OF ANKARA UNIVERSITY 54 (2):77-93.score: 18.0
    This article opens a new discussion in the field of post-classical Islamic intellectual history by showing how literature and intellectual history are two inseparable and interdependent fields through an analysis of Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel, Ḥayy b. Yaqẓān. To this end, the article first examines the tension between the two concepts of jadal and burhān, which have affected much of the currents in classical Islamic intellectual history, and does so by assessing the three main figures in Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel: (...)
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  27. M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
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  28. J. I. Laliwala (2005). Islamic Philosophy of Religion: Synthesis of Science Religion and Philosophy. Sarup & Sons.score: 18.0
    Definition and Meaning of the Islamic Philosophy of Religion Difference between Islamic Philosophy and Muslim Philosophy There is a difference between ...
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  29. Yahya Yasrebi (2007). A Critique of Causality in Islamic Philosophy. Topoi 26 (2):255-265.score: 18.0
    After the problems of epistemology, the most fundamental problem of Islamic philosophy is that of causality. Causality has been studied from various perspectives. This paper endeavors first to analyze the issues of causality in Islamic philosophy and then to critique them. A sketch is provided of the history of the development of theories of causality in Islamic philosophy, with particular attention to how religious considerations came to determine the shape of the philosophical theories that were accepted. It (...)
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  30. Oliver Leaman (2009). Islamic Philosophy: An Introduction. Polity.score: 18.0
    The new edition of Islamic Philosophy will continue to be essential reading for students and scholars of the subject, as well as anyone wanting to learn more ...
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  31. Roszaini Haniffa & Mohammad Hudaib (2007). Exploring the Ethical Identity of Islamic Banks Via Communication in Annual Reports. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):97 - 116.score: 18.0
    Islamic Banks (IBs) are considered as having ethical identity, since the foundation of their business philosophy is closely tied to religion. In this article, we explore whether any discrepancy exists between the communicated (based on information disclosed in the annual reports) and ideal (disclosure of information deemed vital based on the Islamic ethical business framework) ethical identities and we measure this by what we have termed the Ethical Identity Index (EII). Our longitudinal survey results over a 3-year period (...)
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  32. Lenn Evan Goodman (2003). Islamic Humanism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Tracing the course of thought, action, and expression in the golden age of Islamic civilization, L. E. Goodman's Islamic Humanism paints a vivid panorama that departs strikingly from the all too familiar image of Islamic dogma, authoritarianism, and militancy. Among the poets and philosophers, scientists and historians, ethicists and mystics of Islam, Goodman finds a warm and vital humanism, committed to the pursuit of knowledge and to the cosmopolitan values of generosity, tolerance, and understanding. Drawing on a (...)
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  33. Nerina Rustomji (2008). The Garden and the Fire: Heaven and Hell in Islamic Culture. Columbia University Press.score: 18.0
    The garden, the fire, and Islamic origins -- Visions of the afterworld -- Material culture and an Islamic ethic -- Other worldly landscapes and earthly realities -- Humanity, servants, and companions -- Individualized gardens and expanding fires -- Legacy of gardens -- Epilogue.
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  34. Ashk Dahlén (2003). Islamic Law, Epistemology and Modernity: Legal Philosophy in Contemporary Iran. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This book is a comprehensive analysis of the major intellectual positions in the philosophical debate on Islamic law that is occurring in contemporary Iran.
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  35. Gerhard Endress, Rüdiger Arnzen & J. Thielmann (eds.) (2004). Words, Texts, and Concepts Cruising the Mediterranean Sea: Studies on the Sources, Contents and Influences of Islamic Civilization and Arabic Philosophy and Science: Dedicated to Gerhard Endress on His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Peeters.score: 18.0
    This statement by the late Franz Rosenthal is, in a sense, the uniting theme of the present volume's 35 articles by renowned scholars of Islamic Studies, Middle ...
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  36. Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth (2006). God and Humans in Islamic Thought: Abd Al-Jabbar, Ibn Sina and Al-Ghazali. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The explanation of the relationship between God and humans, as portrayed in Islam, is often influenced by the images of God and of human beings which theologians, philosophers and mystics have in mind. The early period of Islam disclose a diversity of interpretations of this relationship. Thinkers from the tenth and eleventh century had the privilege of disclosing different facets of the relationship between humans and the divine. God and Humans in Islamic Thought discusses the view of three different (...)
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  37. Mohammed Ghaly (2012). The Beginning of Human Life: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives. Zygon 47 (1):175-213.score: 18.0
    Abstract. In January 1985, about 80 Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists gathered in a symposium held in Kuwait to discuss the broad question “When does human life begin?” This article argues that this symposium is one of the milestones in the field of contemporary Islamic bioethics and independent legal reasoning (Ijtihād). The proceedings of the symposium, however, escaped the attention of academic researchers. This article is meant to fill in this research lacuna by analyzing the proceedings of this (...)
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  38. Mohammed Ghaly (2012). Religio-Ethical Discussions on Organ Donation Among Muslims in Europe: An Example of Transnational Islamic Bioethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):207-220.score: 18.0
    This article analyzes the religio-ethical discussions of Muslim religious scholars, which took place in Europe specifically in the UK and the Netherlands, on organ donation. After introductory notes on fatwas (Islamic religious guidelines) relevant to biomedical ethics and the socio-political context in which discussions on organ donation took place, the article studies three specific fatwas issued in Europe whose analysis has escaped the attention of modern academic researchers. In 2000 the European Council for Fatwa and Research (ECFR) issued a (...)
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  39. Muhsin Mahdi (2001). Alfarabi and the Foundation of Islamic Political Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    In this work, Muhsin Mahdi--widely regarded as the preeminent scholar of Islamic political thought--distills more than four decades of research to offer an authoritative analysis of the work of Alfarabi, the founder of Islamic political philosophy. Mahdi, who also brought to light writings of Alfarabi that had long been presumed lost or were not even known, presents this great thinker as his contemporaries would have seen him: as a philosopher who sought to lay the foundations for a new (...)
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  40. Ayman Shabana (2012). Paternity Between Law and Biology: The Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Paternity in the Wake of Dna Testing. Zygon 47 (1):214-239.score: 18.0
    Abstract: The discovery of DNA paternity tests has stirred a debate concerning the definition of paternity and whether the grounds for such a definition are legal or biological. According to the classical rules of Islamic law, paternity is established and negated on the basis of a valid marriage. Modern biomedical technology raises the question of whether paternity tests can be the sole basis for paternity, even independently of marriage. Although on the surface this technology seems to challenge the authority (...)
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  41. Abdul Kabir Hussain Solihu & Abdul Rauf Ambali (2011). Dissolving the Engineering Moral Dilemmas Within the Islamic Ethico-Legal Praxes. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):133-147.score: 18.0
    The goal of responsible engineers is the creation of useful and safe technological products and commitment to public health, while respecting the autonomy of the clients and the public. Because engineers often face moral dilemma to resolve such issues, different engineers have chosen different course of actions depending on their respective moral value orientations. Islam provides a value-based mechanism rooted in the Maqasid al-Shari‘ah (the objectives of Islamic law). This mechanism prioritizes some values over others and could help resolve (...)
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  42. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.) (2006). Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology on the Perennial Issue of Microcosm and Macrocosm. Springer.score: 18.0
    By proposing the Microcosm and Macrocosm analogy for dialogue between Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology, the authors of this volume are reviving the perennial positioning of the human condition in the play of forces within and without the human being. This theme has run from Plato through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Modernity, and has been ignored by contemporaries. It now acquires a new pertinence and striking significance due to the scientific discoveries into the "infinitely small" in life, on (...)
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  43. Salman H. Bashier (2011). The Story of Islamic Philosophy: Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Al-'Arabi, and Others on the Limit Between Naturalism and Traditionalism. State University of New York Press.score: 18.0
    Offers a new interpretation of medieval Islamic philosophy, one informed by Platonic mysticism.
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  44. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (ed.) (2005). Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Philosophy in the Islamic world emerged in the ninth century and continued to flourish into the fourteenth century. It was strongly influenced by Greek thought, but Islamic philosophers also developed an original philosophical culture of their own, which had a considerable impact on the subsequent course of Western philosophy. This volume offers new translations of philosophical writings by Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes). All of the texts presented here were very influential and (...)
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  45. Lenn Evan Goodman (1999). Jewish and Islamic Philosophy: Crosspollinations in the Classic Age. Rutgers University Press.score: 18.0
    Examines core issues common to Jewish and Islamic philosophy, such as freedom and determinism, the basis of ethical values, and the relationship between faith ...
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  46. Seyyed Hossein Nasr (1996). The Islamic Intellectual Tradition in Persia. Curzon Press.score: 18.0
    This volume gathers together the numerous essays by the Iranian metaphysician and ontologist, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, on Islamic philosophers and the intricate ...
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  47. Abbas J. Ali, Abdulrahman Al-Aali & Abdullah Al-Owaihan (2013). Islamic Perspectives on Profit Maximization. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):467-475.score: 18.0
    Ethical considerations, especially those religiously driven, play a significant role in shaping business conduct and priorities. Profit levels and earnings constitute an integral part of business considerations and are relevant and closely linked to prevailing ethics. In this paper, Islamic prescriptions on profit maximization are introduced. Islamic business ethics are outlined as well. It is suggested that while Islamic teaching treats profits as reward for engaging in vital activities necessary for serving societal interests, profit maximization is not (...)
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  48. Peter S. Groff (2007). Islamic Philosophy a-Z. Edinburgh University Press.score: 18.0
    Topical entries cover various issues and key positions in all the major areas of philosophy, making clear why the central problems of Islamic philosophy have ...
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  49. Safei El-Deen Hamed (1993). Seeing the Environment Through Islamic Eyes: Application Ofshariah to Natural Resources Planning and Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (2):145-164.score: 18.0
    A comprehensive paradigm of environmental ethics should encompass two things: (1) a particular way of life, and (2) a path to achieve that ideal. An effective paradigm must also be internally consistent, yet externally workable in the real world. On the whole, the modern environmental movement has failed to provide these essential components and qualities in its associated philosophies, most of which suffer from being too abstract or too utopian.This paper suggests that Islam, as a religion and as a body (...)
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  50. İbrahim Kalın (2010). Knowledge in Later Islamic Philosophy: Mulla Sadra on Existence, Intellect, and Intuition. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This study looks at how the seventeenth-century philosopher Sadr al-Din al-Shirazi, known as Mulla Sadra, attempted to reconcile the three major forms of ...
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