Search results for 'Islamic law' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Sami Al-Daghistani (2016). Semiotics of Islamic Law, Maṣlaḥa, and Islamic Economic Thought. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):389-404.
    The paper explores the role and meaning of maṣlaḥa and its possible appropriation in the field of Islamic legal and economic thought, as laid down by various medieval and contemporary Muslim scholars. Questions that are pertinent to the research are the following: how has maṣlaḥa been incorporated in legal reasoning and what kind of meaning does it convey; what type of economic reading does it presuppose; do ethics, law, and scriptural sources play equally important role as reference in developing (...)
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  2. Valentino Cattelan (2016). Alice’s Adventures, Abductive Reasoning and the Logic of Islamic Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):359-388.
    How does a Muslim jurist think the law and how, accordingly, he judges a fact? Using Alice in Wonderland as hermeneutical device to explore the logic of fiqh, this article identifies a divergence between Western and Islamic legal thinking in the application of abduction as key form of inference in the law of Islam. In particular, looking at the fact/law relation in symbolic terms, the article highlights how, while a dichotomy between fact and law characterizes Western legal thinking, fiqh (...)
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  3.  60
    Ayman Shabana (2012). Paternity Between Law and Biology: The Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Paternity in the Wake of Dna Testing. Zygon 47 (1):214-239.
    Abstract: The discovery of DNA paternity tests has stirred a debate concerning the definition of paternity and whether the grounds for such a definition are legal or biological. According to the classical rules of Islamic law, paternity is established and negated on the basis of a valid marriage. Modern biomedical technology raises the question of whether paternity tests can be the sole basis for paternity, even independently of marriage. Although on the surface this technology seems to challenge the authority (...)
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  4.  26
    Ashk Dahlén (2003). Islamic Law, Epistemology and Modernity: Legal Philosophy in Contemporary Iran. Routledge.
    This book is a comprehensive analysis of the major intellectual positions in the philosophical debate on Islamic law that is occurring in contemporary Iran.
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  5.  1
    Youssef Cherem (2011). As ambiguidades do direito islâmico em contextos contemporâneos (The ambiguities of Islamic law in contemporary contexts) - DOI: 10.5752/ P.2175-5841.2011v9n20p153. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (20):153-170.
    Resumo Uma das reivindicações centrais dos movimentos políticos islâmicos é cumprir ou impor a sharī'a . Mas a visão que esses movimentos têm destoa da maneira como os sistemas jurídicos muçulmanos funcionaram historicamente. A própria definição de sharī'a , sua relação com o poder político, e sua aplicação num processo que leva a uma decisão jurídica, foram simplificados durante o processo de codificação dos séculos XIX e XX, e os movimentos islamistas são herdeiros dessa concepção "ocidentalizada" de sharī'a. Frequentemente traduzido (...)
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  6.  49
    Ayman Shabana (2013). Law and Ethics in Islamic Bioethics: Nonmaleficence in Islamic Paternity Regulations. Zygon 48 (3):709-731.
    In Islamic law paternity is treated as a consequence of a licit sexual relationship. Since DNA testing makes a clear distinction between legal and biological paternity possible, it challenges the continued correlation between paternity and marriage. This article explores the foundations of paternity regulations in the Islamic ethico-legal tradition, with a particular focus on what is termed here “the licit sex principle,” and investigates the extent to which a harm-based argument can be made either by appeal to or (...)
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  7.  11
    Mona Siddiqui (2012). The Good Muslim: Reflections on Classical Islamic Law and Theology. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Spoken, intended and problematic divorce in Hanafi Fiqh; 2. Between person and property - slavery in Qudūrī's Mukhtasar; 3. Pig, purity and permission in Mālikī slaughter; 4. Islamic and other perspectives on evil; 5. The language of love in the Qur'ān; 6. Virtue and limits in the ethics of friendship 7. Drinking and drunkenness in Ibn Rushd.
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  8.  1
    Sami Al-Daghistani (2016). Semiotics of Islamic Law, Maṣlaḥa. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):389-404.
    The paper explores the role and meaning of maṣlaḥa and its possible appropriation in the field of Islamic legal and economic thought, as laid down by various medieval and contemporary Muslim scholars. Questions that are pertinent to the research are the following: how has maṣlaḥa been incorporated in legal reasoning and what kind of meaning does it convey; what type of economic reading does it presuppose; do ethics, law, and scriptural sources play equally important role as reference in developing (...)
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  9.  17
    John Kelsay (2003). Al-Shaybani and the Islamic Law of War. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (1):63-75.
    One of the ways Islamic tradition addresses questions of military ethics is through inquiries into the shari'a, indicating the ideal way of life and usually rendered as Islamic 'law'. Discussion of the shari?a includes an extended conversation concerning the justification and conduct of war. The work of al-Shaybani (d. 804) and other early scholars in the Hanafi school illustrates an important moment in this conversation, establishing precedents to which subsequent generations of Muslims (including contemporary Muslims) must respond. Further, (...)
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  10.  20
    Hadassa A. Noorda (2012). The Islamic Law of War – Justifications and Regulations. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):67-69.
    Book Review: Ahmed Al Dawoody, The Islamic Law of War - Justifications and Regulations -.
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  11.  1
    Mustafa Shah (2016). The Case of Variae Lectiones in Classical Islamic Jurisprudence: Grammar and the Interpretation of Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):285-311.
    The qirāʾāt or variae lectiones represent the vast corpus of Qurʾānic readings that were preserved through the historical processes associated with the textual codification and transmission of the Qurʾān. Despite the fact that differences among concomitant readings tend to be nominal, others betray semantic nuances that are brought into play within legal discourses. Both types of readings remain important sources for the history of the text of the Qur’ān and early Arabic grammatical thought. While some recent scholars have questioned the (...)
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  12. J. N. D. Anderson (2007). Islamic Law in Africa. Routledge.
    In many parts of Africa three different systems of laws are concurrently applied – the imported "Colonial" law, the indigenous customary law and Islamic law. In some countries the customary and the Islamic law are kept separate and distinct, while in others they are fused into a single system. This volume represents a unique survey of the extent to which Islamic law is in fact applied in those parts of East and West Africa which were at one (...)
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  13. J. N. D. Anderson (2010). Islamic Law in Africa. Routledge.
    This volume represents a unique survey of the extent to which Islamic law is in fact applied in those parts of East and West Africa which were at one time under British administration. It examines the relevant legislation and case law, much of which has never appeared in any Law Reports; the judges and courts which apply it and the problems to which its application give rise.
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  14. B. Dupret (2007). What Is Islamic Law?: A Praxiological Answer and an Egyptian Case Study. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (2):79-100.
    In this article, I first criticize commonly held assumptions about what Islamic law is. I suggest that it is at best useless and at worst wrong to start with a label like ‘Islamic law’ to describe something that is presumed to be an instance of such a label. I identify the source of confusion, i.e. the postulate that there must be a kind of genealogical continuity between what people refer to as Islamic law and Islamic law (...)
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  15. Birgit Krawietz, Georges Tamer & Alina Kokoschka (eds.) (2013). Islamic Theology, Philosophy and Law: Debating Ibn Taymiyya and Ibn Qayyim Al-Jawziyya. De Gruyter.
     
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  16.  9
    Walid Mansour, Khoutem Ben Jedidia & Jihed Majdoub (2015). How Ethical is Islamic Banking in the Light of the Objectives of Islamic Law? Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):51-77.
    Islamic banking is based on moral foundations that make it distinct from conventional banking. Some argue that because of its foundation in Islam, Islamic banking may represent a more morally appealing alternative. Yet, evidence shows that this is not the case. Indeed, the current practice of Islamic banking has not been able to achieve its goals which are based on Islam's moral values: to enhance justice, equitability, and social well-being. This essay examines the extent to which (...) banking is ethical and concludes that the practice of the industry does not seem to be de facto ethical from the Islamic perspective of ethical values. It only consists in trading the same instruments of conventional banks without genuinely enforcing Islam's ethical vision. The practice of Islamic banking misrepresents Islam and does not contribute to solving social problems. The interaction between maqasid al-shari᾽a and qiyās provides a supplementary tool for interpreting the failure of the prior in terms of the practical misuse of the latter by Islamic banks. This essay provides an interpretive approach to the current debate about why Islamic banking has failed and suggests ways to move cautiously in the future. (shrink)
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  17.  44
    Aasim I. Padela (2013). Islamic Bioethics: Between Sacred Law, Lived Experiences, and State Authority. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):65-80.
    There is burgeoning interest in the field of “Islamic” bioethics within public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several (...)
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  18.  2
    Colin Imber (forthcoming). The Second Formation of Islamic Law: The Hanafi School in the Early Modern Ottoman EmpireBy Guy Burak. Journal of Islamic Studies:etv084.
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  19.  2
    John Kelsay (forthcoming). The Islamic Law of War: Justifications and RegulationsBy Ahmed Al-Dawoody. Journal of Islamic Studies:etv093.
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  20.  1
    Michael Dann (forthcoming). Islamic Law in Theory: Studies on Jurisprudence in Honor of Bernard WeissEdited by A. Kevin Reinhart and Robert Gleave, with an Appreciation by Peter Sluglett. Journal of Islamic Studies:etv067.
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  21.  1
    Rafat Y. Alwazna (2016). Islamic Law: Its Sources, Interpretation and the Translation of It Into Laws Written in English. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (2):251-260.
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  22.  1
    H. Hassan (2002). Contracts in Islamic Law: The Principles of Commutative Justice and Liberality. Journal of Islamic Studies 13 (3):257-297.
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  23.  1
    H. Hassan (2002). Review: Islamic Law: Theory and Practice: Islamic Law: Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 13 (1):50-51.
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  24. A. A. Ahmad (2007). Authority, Conflict, and the Transmission of Diversity in Medieval Islamic Law * by R. Kevin Jaques. Journal of Islamic Studies 18 (2):246-248.
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  25. Oussama Arabi (1995). Al-Sanhūrī's Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Contract Defects. Journal of Islamic Studies 6 (2):153-172.
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  26. I. Cebeci (2012). Custom in Islamic Law and Legal Theory: The Development of the Concepts of Lhringurf and Lhringadah in the Islamic Legal Tradition * by Ayman Shabana. Journal of Islamic Studies 23 (2):229-231.
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  27. M. I. Dien (2001). Islamic Law of Business Organization Corporations. Islamic Law and Jurisprudence, Volume 2 By Imran Ahsan Khan Nyazee , 211 Pp. Price PB Not Given. ISBN 1-56564-090-X. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 12 (3):329-331.
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  28. Muhammed Selim El-awa (1991). Approaches to Sharī'a: A Response to N. J. Coulson's a History of Islamic Law. Journal of Islamic Studies 2 (2):143-179.
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  29. M. H. Fadel (2007). A History of the Early Islamic Law of Property: Reconstructing the Legal Development, 7th-9th Centuries * by Hiroyuki Yanagihashi. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 18 (1):100-102.
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  30. C. Fluehr-Lobban (2005). Review: The Reinstatement of Islamic Law in Sudan Under Numayri: An Evaluation of a Legal Experiment in Light of its Historical Context, Methodology, and Repercussions. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 16 (2):251-254.
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  31. W. B. Hallaq (2008). The Origins and Evolution of Islamic Law: A Response * BY WAEL B. HALLAQ. Journal of Islamic Studies 19 (3):456-466.
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  32. H. Hassan (2001). Islamic Law and Culture 1600-1840 By Haim Gerber. Leiden: Brill. Vol. 9 in Studies in Islamic Law and Society, 1999. Pp. 156. Price HB $55.00. 90-0-11319-3. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 12 (2):203-207.
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  33. H. Hassan (2001). The Spirit of Islamic Law By Bernard G. Weiss , 224 Pp. Price HB 35.95. ISBN 0-8203-1977-5. Journal of Islamic Studies 12 (3):327-329.
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  34. R. Kana'an (2001). Waqfs and Urban Structures: The Case of Ottoman Damascus By Richard van Leeuwen. Leiden: E. J. Brill. Studies in Islamic Law and Society. 1999. Pp. 323. Price HB $76.50. 90-04-11299-5. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 12 (1):88-90.
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  35. J. Kelsay (2005). Review: International Human Rights and Islamic Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 16 (2):242-245.
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  36. M. A. Nadwi (2007). The Origins and Evolution of Islamic Law * BY WAEL B. HALLAQ. Journal of Islamic Studies 19 (1):109-115.
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  37. Y. Rapoport (2014). On Taql D: Ibn Al Qayyim's Critique of Authority in Islamic Law by Abdul-Rahman Mustafa. Journal of Islamic Studies 25 (3):353-354.
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  38. M. Siddiqui (2007). Crime and Punishment in Islamic Law * by Rudolph Peters. Journal of Islamic Studies 18 (2):244-246.
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  39. Luqman Zakariyah (forthcoming). Al-Shāfi’Ī’s Position on Analogical Reasoning in Islamic Criminal Law: Jurists Debates and Human Rights Implications. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-19.
    Al-Shāfi’ī has been unreservedly credited as one of the designers, if not the “master architect,” of uṣūl al-fiqh. His most important scholarly work, Al-Risālah, clearly demonstrates his cognitive creativity in this field. One of the methodologies for the decision of cases under Islamic law that Al-Shāfi’ī championed is qiyās, which he equated with ijtihād. His balanced approach invites further enquiry into the extensive use of qiyās in general and in criminal law in particular. The extent to which qiyās can (...)
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  40. M. Q. Zaman (2002). Review: Islamic Law and Legal System: Studies of Saudi Arabia * Frank E. Vogel: Islamic Law and Legal System: Studies of Saudi Arabia. [REVIEW] Journal of Islamic Studies 13 (1):51-54.
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  41. M. Zubair Abbasi (2014). Islamic Law and Social Change: An Insight Into the Making of Anglo-Muhammadan Law. Journal of Islamic Studies 25 (3):325-349.
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  42. Talal Asad (2003). Boundaries and Rights in Islamic Law: Introduction. Social Research: An International Quarterly 70 (3):683-686.
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  43.  70
    Farid Abdel-Nour (2006). International Human Rights and Islamic Law - by Mashood A. Baderin. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):388–390.
  44.  19
    Ziba Mir‐Hosseini (2006). Muslim Women's Quest for Equality: Between Islamic Law and Feminism. Critical Inquiry 32 (4):629-645.
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  45. Nadia Abu-Zahra (2000). Islamic History, Islamic Identity and the Reform of Islamic Law: The Thought of Husayn Ahmad Amin. In Ronald L. Nettler, Mohamed Mahmoud & John Cooper (eds.), Islam and Modernity: Muslim Intellectuals Respond. I. B. Tauris
     
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  46.  1
    Bernard Weiss & John Burton (1993). The Sources of Islamic Law: Islamic Theories of Abrogation. Journal of the American Oriental Society 113 (2):304.
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  47.  6
    Yasin Dutton (2008). Agostino Cilardo, The Qur'ānic Term “Kalāla”. Studies in Arabic Language and Poetry,“Hadi”,“Tafsīr”, and “Fiqh”: Notes on the Origins of Islamic Law.(Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies Monograph Series, 1.) Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2005. Pp. Xiii, 116; Diagrams. $50. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (4):970-971.
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  48.  2
    Thomas Devaney (2015). David Freidenreich, Foreigners and Their Food: Constructing Otherness in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Law. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011. Pp. Xvii, 352; 1 Black-and-White Figure and 10 Charts. $63. ISBN: 978-0-5202-5321-6. [REVIEW] Speculum 90 (3):810-811.
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  49.  3
    Wael Hallaq (1990). The Use and Abuse of Evidence: The Question of Provincial and Roman Influences on Early Islamic Law. [REVIEW] Journal of the American Oriental Society 110 (1):79-91.
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  50.  7
    John Kelsay (1994). Islamic Law and Ethics: Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 22 (1):93 - 99.
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